Help with restricting access to NAS

antighsiothail

Active Member
Totally new to having a NAS, was given an old Netgear Readynas 102. I've learned to set it up so that all the smart devices, (tv's ipads etc etc) can access films/music/documents etc on it through being DNLA enabled.
I used to use a TP-Link Archer VR900 modem/router set up with a guest network, so was quite happy that private documents etc, couldn't be accessed by guests.
Having moved house I could only get broadband through BT and was sent a Smart Hub2, this doesn't have the facility for a guest network, so how do I stop guests accessing the NAS when they are logged into my home network? I have tried reading through varied explanations but to be honest a lot of it goes over my head, is there a simple way (for an old fogey like me) to control access without stopping all the tv's etc having access?
I would be tempted to go back to the TP-Link, but BT are sending me 2 discs free of charge to help with no/poor signal areas around the house.
The NAS uses OS 6.10.4 if that's any help.
Thank you for reading this, hope you can help.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
Most Servers have mechanisms for credentials (loginids and passwords) and "permissions" that can be used to police who can access what. It's going to be a step up in knowledge though, don't expect to just click a couple of buttons and "tada" there it is all done.

Check the manual for your NAS to see what it offers in terms of "permissions" and "credentials." There's a few ways we could explore in how to organise it, depending on the capabilities of you storage device.

Having a separate "guest" network completely sequests the traffic of one network from another. The effect might be the same, but the mechanisms are totally different. All the traffic on your "guest" network simply has no sight of anything on your main network (and vice-versa.) Using one big network, even if you protect your NAS, still allows your "guest" devices to "see" (and potentially probe if they are carrying malicious software) things on your main LAN. It's a value judgement as to how big a risk that is for your use case.
 
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cjed

Well-known Member
If you are getting a couple of BT Whole Home WiFi Discs, they will have the ability to set up a guest network. You will need to set them up and then disable your hub WiFi.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
@cjed - how do they then "route" the VLAN's...? Is one of the discs functioning as a router, or do they rely on the SmartHub to do it somehow? Just curious.
 

antighsiothail

Active Member
Thank you mickevh, >It's going to (be) a step up in knowledge though< and after going through that my NAS can still be seen and may/possibly be compromised. On balance I think I may go back to the TP-Link, not sure if it will work with the BT discs, suspect not. That may lead to having to buy an extender or 2. Thank you for replying, even though it 'frightened me off' :)
 

antighsiothail

Active Member
If you are getting a couple of BT Whole Home WiFi Discs, they will have the ability to set up a guest network. You will need to set them up and then disable your hub WiFi.
@cjed - how do they then "route" the VLAN's...? Is one of the discs functioning as a router, or do they rely on the SmartHub to do it somehow? Just curious.
That does sound interesting, I would like to know that as well. I'm not sure what discs are being sent, after a long online chat with someone at BT they just said they would 'send a couple of discs free of charge'.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
When you get it, if you post up the make/models of the kit, it's likely someone here will know how it works, or if they are feeling really charitable, take shufty at the manuals and see what it can do.

Unlike some ISP's, BT are generally pretty accommodating about which router you use with their service, so you can probably use you old one if you wanted to. (I'm on BT and use a Western Digital router that has a "guest" network and it's worked fine for years.)

Where things get a bit more tricky is when you need to extend multiple networks over multiple Wi-Fi Access Points (AP's - the "discs" are actually AP's.) It's far from impossible (we've done it in "big business forever) but sometimes the abilities of cheap SOHO equipment can be a bit restricted. But let's not jump the gun - tell us what you get when it arrives and there's a good chance someone here will figure it out what you can do.
 

antighsiothail

Active Member
When you get it, if you post up the make/models of the kit, it's likely someone here will know how it works, or if they are feeling really charitable, take shufty at the manuals and see what it can do.

Unlike some ISP's, BT are generally pretty accommodating about which router you use with their service, so you can probably use you old one if you wanted to. (I'm on BT and use a Western Digital router that has a "guest" network and it's worked fine for years.)

Where things get a bit more tricky is when you need to extend multiple networks over multiple Wi-Fi Access Points (AP's - the "discs" are actually AP's.) It's far from impossible (we've done it in "big business forever) but sometimes the abilities of cheap SOHO equipment can be a bit restricted. But let's not jump the gun - tell us what you get when it arrives and there's a good chance someone here will figure it out what you can do.
Will do, supposed to have been here last week but we've been having ferry and plane cancellations due to the weather. Thank you.
 

cjed

Well-known Member
@cjed - how do they then "route" the VLAN's...? Is one of the discs functioning as a router, or do they rely on the SmartHub to do it somehow? Just curious.
Good question. At least one disk is directly connected by ethernet to your existing router, which still provides the DHCP server. I assume the Guest WiFi is a separate logical LAN managed by the discs (although on the same IP subnet) which can only talk to the gateway (original router) and non-subnet addresses, and not talk to anything else on the normal internal LAN.

The best info I can find from BT online says : "In terms of full isolation, due to the way Whole Home Wi-Fi works (as a set of access points rather than having full router control) it can only manage its own network. Any client connected to the Guest Wi-Fi can only send/receive data from the Internet and not clients on your LAN (even those connected to the router). They are also blocked from using the Whole Home app and web interface."
 

Ross Martin

Active Member
I imagine it is like the guest setting on the Ubiquity APs. The AP handles the routing for the guest network whilst not giving access to the AP LAN connection.
 

antighsiothail

Active Member
Just been onto BT chat as there is no sign of the discs. Been told that the agent shouldn't have told me I could have 2 (any) as I don't have a subscription to Complete wifi, which is apparently an extra £10 per month. OK back to my old TP-link modem/router. Thank you for your input, much appreciated.
 

antighsiothail

Active Member
Just to add, despite being told the order had been cancelled as I don't have the subscription, 2 black discs turned up today. Good old BT still seems left hand doesn't know what the right hand is doing.
 

rpr

Active Member
Just to add, despite being told the order had been cancelled as I don't have the subscription, 2 black discs turned up today. Good old BT still seems left hand doesn't know what the right hand is doing.
Err no they didn't ;)
 

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