Help with painting projector screen please

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Building DIY' started by Navnut, Mar 8, 2013.

  1. Navnut

    Navnut
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    Hello friends

    Need your advise on how to paint a screen for home cinema projection. I have been using a magnolia coloured wall (plasterboard) for over a year. While I loved it to start with I cant stand the washed out areas of the screen that are sometimes produced.
    My projector is JVC HD350 I have covered all the windows so ambient light not an issue and have put up some velvet (more to go up). So I have decided to go for a matt or soft sheen white paint.

    I have no experience with DIY so could really use some input. So with the Magnolia that is already there do I need to sand this down, use a primer over this, or do I paint white straight on top?
    How many coats will I need to paint? Am i supposed to sand between each coat, do I need to buy an electric sander.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    http://www.avforums.com/forums/atta...y-room-acoustics-then-try-limit-errors-r7.jpg

    http://www.avforums.com/forums/atta...y-room-acoustics-then-try-limit-errors-r8.jpg

    Also I have filled some holes in with filler, will this blend in once painted?

    Welcome all your knowledge thanks
     

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  2. bryanchicken

    bryanchicken
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    No experience with this but "Dave's 16:9 home cinema build" uses a painted screen and he used pourascreen
     
  3. knight2000uk

    knight2000uk
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    Most of the filling should blend in once painted providing that your finishing work is adequate ie leaving lumps and raised parts where the sanding has not come level, use a block of wood with a few sheets of sandpaper tacked to it to ensure all your filling comes flush with the existing wall materials, once that's done and your happy that your work is well test the areas with paint before doing the whole wall :)
    I thought about this myself but my wall is totally on the **** with a lump in the middle of it which throws the picture off so ended up making a DIY fixed frame screen :)
     
  4. Davek0974

    Davek0974
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    Is this a permanent screen or do you want it to look a wall between films?

    I'm the Dave in the 16:9 build mentioned :) and can recommend the pourascreen stuff, you could do the whole wall if wanted as its a pretty neutral grey colour.

    Sand the surface the use Johnstones all in one primer and undercoat followed by a light sanding, wipe then two coats of pourascreen without sanding between, don't fanny about with it just roll on, going over the joins and leave it, it smooths out nicely while drying.

    so far, the results look excellent.
     
  5. nlarged1

    nlarged1
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    Hi,I'm on my 3rd D.I.Y. Screen and have used different brands of screen paint including the diy black widow.

    The first thing to correct is the surface,if you have any lumps or cracks or paint runs,they will stand out like a sore thumb! secondly and what nobody seems to mention is the border,you definately need a black border for the eye to
    recognise the changes in contrast,(not sure if I've worded that right but this will make a BIG difference.

    Thirdly,having tried to mix my own paint with some success,the screen paint I'm currently using was from a british company called 'project x' from projectorscreenpaint.com ,this is the best set up I've had so far.

    Hope this helps and good luck!
     
  6. Navnut

    Navnut
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    Hi guys thanks for all the input.

    Davek0974 I can't seem to find a white in the pourascreen, also is this only available from the states? Are there any roller marks left over from the pourascreen? Have you tried any paints other then the pourascreen? What colour is the Johnstones all in one primer and does this go straight over the magnolia?
    Can i get away with a manual sander or do I need an electric one?

    nlarged1 I will definitely have a border but still considering if I should paint one or use something like mighty brighty's magnetic border kit. Then I will cover the remaining part of the wall with black velvet.

    Its interesting you should recommend the projectx screen paint, out of all the others (mighty brighty, screen goo, paint on screen) this was the one with the least info out there. Having seen no pics/reviews I was not prepared to chance it, if its better than black widow than its worth considering. But again there is no white version.
    ProjectX recommends a white eggshell emulsion as a basecoat, have you used this?

    Has anyone tried the earlex HVLP spray sytems, or can recommend an alternative?

    Sorry for the bombardment of questions fellas

    really appreciate all your help :thumbsup:
     
  7. Davek0974

    Davek0974
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    The pourascreen is only available in the one shade. I got mine from amazon and it came from the uk, the telephone support line was uk too. It all depends how good your wall is to start with, I used a sheet of MDF so it was perfectly smooth.

    If you have existing brush / roller marks then level out with some good sandpaper then a coat of primer which was a dark grey colour then another sanding. I used a 4" roller and short-haired sleeve, get a couple so you don't need to was out. Inbetween coats I just wrapped the roller in cling film to keep it wet, left the screen to dry for a couple of hours then put the next coat on.

    Btw I would never use a spray indoors, too messy.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2013
  8. Navnut

    Navnut
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    Hey could anyone tell me what a dust coat is? Does anyone know of any neutral white paints, and do you need a specific type of HVLP sprayer for emulsion paints?
    thanks
     
  9. Davek0974

    Davek0974
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    A dust coat is a term generally used in car body spraying, google "dust coat".

    Not sure what you mean by neutral white, white by its very nature is neutral, unless youre looking tinted whites.

    Hvlp means high volume low pressure, it will be atomising paint quite a lot which means a lot of overspray and mess. IMHO it would be faster to use a high quality roller.
     
  10. Navnut

    Navnut
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    Oh I must have got my wires crossed I thought some paints added extra pigments which can cause colour shift. Giving me the impression that some brands "Brilliant White" was not actually a true white.
    Is tinting whites to negate ambient light?

    I'm just trying to get as much info as I can about the different methods of screen painting so I can decide on which to use. Painting with rollers seems alot more straight forward but longer, and spraying seems to give better results depending on the sprayer's skill.

    Davek your rollered screen looks pretty good would love to see some shots of it in action when you get the chance.
     
  11. Davek0974

    Davek0974
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    I will stick some up as soon as i can find a camera that can do a good job, my little one has no manual exposure and just makes a mess out of it :)

    Will do some close-up shots too.
     
  12. Davek0974

    Davek0974
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    Here we go,

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Pics still don't do it justice, it's much better in reality.
     
  13. Navnut

    Navnut
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  14. Davek0974

    Davek0974
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    I would a decent mask, not necessarily a respirator, with any spray, can't be too careful.

    Ideally the test surface should be of the same material as your screen will be made of.
     
  15. Navnut

    Navnut
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    Hey guyz i finally got round to spray painting white primer/undercoat on my wall.

    The picture is brighter and has more punch than before. On the whole i am pleased with it, but i still get washed out areas on the image.
    I would like to try one of the projector screen paints so that i can combat this. But due to the lumps on my wall i don't want to risk forking out for expensive paint that will highlight all the imperfections of my wall.
    At the moment the matt sheen of the primer i have used, hides all the lumps on the wall.
    I don't know if i can maximise the picture quality of the screen any more than i have. Do any of you have any suggestions?
     

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  16. Scifi

    Scifi
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    Don't know if any of you guys are interested but I have a projector screen surface, its a Draper flexwhite 210cm wide 16:9. Unfortunately I had to buy a replacement surface (cost me another £200) as I somehow flicked red marker pen on it I managed to removed most of it and there are now a couple of faint pink marks to one side, the reverse is usable too but has very faint glossy strips as it is not supposed to be used as the viewing surface they can only really be seen when close and on bright white images.

    Just thought it may be better than a painted wall? as could easily be fixed to a wooden frame or just fixed directly onto the wall

    70 inches width of the screen is unmarked

    Not looking for much just seems a waste to just throw it away, PM me if interested
     
  17. knight2000uk

    knight2000uk
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    This would be a better option if your wall is a little shabby guys, saves a lot of replastering work, would have to have a wall skimmed if you wanted a good picture with very little artifacts, my wall showed up all sorts!
     
  18. Navnut

    Navnut
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    I was hoping replastering would not be needed, I may just have to live with the washed out effect, as otherwise I love the picture. knight2000uk what paint and colour did you use?
     
  19. knight2000uk

    knight2000uk
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    i didnt use paint ended up going with a DIY screen made of 3" by 1 1/2" wood and fabric from good old fleabay, its not mind blowingly good looking but it serves the purpose for now :)
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  20. jagdeepp

    jagdeepp
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    I have a 4 metre wide 2.35:1 scope screen wall. Originally used (and still have, now packed away) a Carada 3mtr fixed screen.

    My screen wall was rubbed down by hand. I then applied a first coat of specialist white paint designed exclusively to do what it says on the tin... brilliant white. Thats it. Nothing fancy at all. But, use a good quality paint. I used dulux trade brilliant white matte.

    After the first coat i gave a gentle sand and applied the second. Another gentle sand and the 3rd and final coat. To get the border perfect, I used frogtape which is excellent masking tape. As simple as that. You don't need an electrical sander necassarily. All this screen goo malarky is total over hyped junk imho. I've seen a couple and thought its no better. I have a briiliant white screen. The paint is just as effective. Pourascreen? Pour me a bloody drink! :devil:
     
  21. Navnut

    Navnut
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    Hey jagdeepp

    I know i've asked this in your own thread. But are you sure you don't get any kind of wash out effect on your screen, you sure theres no placebo effect going on here, lol. I'm not dissin you its just hard to believe that matt Brilliant white has given such amazing results. Having said that your setup is definitely one of the best i've ever seen and thats just from forum pics which says alot.
     
  22. jagdeepp

    jagdeepp
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    No wash out effect at all. I've not once thought I need a fabric screen. No texture visible either.
     
  23. Navnut

    Navnut
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    Thanks for rubbing it in, lol. Maybe there's not enough lumens in the HD 350?
     
  24. jagdeepp

    jagdeepp
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    How big is the screen wall? Have you thought about just buying a fixed frame screen? I have a 3 metre Canada screen in the classifieds. Even if you decide to use the fabric you could stretch it over your own sized frame if its smaller than 3 metres. Just a thought dude.

    I had a 350 firing onto my 3 metre 16:9 screen with zero washout.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2013
  25. Davek0974

    Davek0974
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    This is an important note.

    I am using a grey screen as the 1070 is pretty bright and i have a fully controlled cinema, a white screen ( tried a large sheet of white foam board) was way too bright, you had to squint to watch it.

    The pourascreen stuff has tiny metallic flakes in it too.
     
  26. Navnut

    Navnut
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    I usually project at a width of 295cm, but for scope movies i zoom in and then the width is about 350cm. I have thought about a fixed screen but the expense is a-bit too much for a good screen. Plus I love the flexibility of the wall, being able to zoom not so common formats like 1.3:1 to a size that suits me and not constrained to a fixed screen.
    I don't follow what you mean about the fabric jagdeepp.
     
  27. Peter Parker

    Peter Parker
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    You could try some blackout cloth or a bedsheet, but it doesn't sound like it's the wall IMHO. Can you capture what you're seeing in a photo? Have you tried different gamma settings? They can make a difference.

    Gary
     
  28. jagdeepp

    jagdeepp
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    3.5 metres in scope zoomed is still 3.5 metres scope for the jvc 350. You are seriously pushing the limits of the jvc350 with an image that size and the lower lumens. A ageing bulb won't help your cause either. I'd consider a pj with higher lumens. To be fair, the jvc x35 and x55 will fill that out very well. A Sony hw50e will handle the image size with ease. Be prepared to Chang your bulb every 1000 hours though if you want a punchy image. I've had my pj for close to 7 months and I've still not reached 160 hours on the bulb!
     
  29. Navnut

    Navnut
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    Gary i played with the gamma as you suggested, and took it down from 2.2 to 1.8 which helped the most. But i was too concerned i was watching a wildly inaccurate image, so i settled on 2.0. Isn't this still too far off from the ideal 2.2 ideal?

    Jagdeepp i can't argue with what you said because you make very valid points. However due to finances i won't be upgrading for a long while. I don't feel my image is dim though sometimes i have to lower the aperture because it can get too bright. I will see how i get along with different gamma settings for now.
    But yeah a new projector would definitely help me out.

    Thanks again
     
  30. Peter Parker

    Peter Parker
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    Gamma setting depends on the contrast capability of the pj and the viewing conditions. A pj with higher contrast capability can use a higher gamma, but room conditions such as ambient light will dictate a lower gamma. All gamma is, is a luminance factor applied to different levels of the image - dark bits want less luminance than brighter bits for example, otherwise all of the image will look very flat if they all use the same luminance/image 'brightness'. So although 2.2 gamma is nice to have and is a recommended setting, it doesn't mean you can't have higher or lower. What the pj says it's giving you isn't necessarily what it would measure at, so you can't always take the number as gospel. When you use a lower gamma, does it look inaccurate compared to before?

    When you say 'washed out', do you mean the blacks look very grey, or a lot of shadow detail looks black, so shadow detail is missing; 'crushed' into one level of black? If you zoom the image smaller, does it improve?

    Gary
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2013

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