Help with Linksys Velop mesh wifi

Ronm

Standard Member
Hi
I hope anybody can advise me with the following issue, have tried linksys support but unable to help, didn't seem to understand the problem.

I have my Velop AX4200 tower connected via an ethernet cable to my ISP gateway. The wifi coverage is excellent so am well pleased. However I have a problem that I am unable to connect to my gateway using the usual 192.168 ... IP address to access the login to the gateway either via wifi or using the ethernet ports on the velop. The only way I can access my gateway is to connect via ethernet connected directely to the gateway but not via any connection through the velop.

Wonder if any kind soul has any ideas how a connection to the gateway can be enabled via the velop, velop doesn't seem to recognise the IP address 192.168.

Many thanks
Ron
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
It would be useful if you cite the make/model of your ISP gateway.

If your Velop system is functioning as a router, then one of it's nodes will form the boundary between your "internal" network and the external network (ie the Internet) - joining networks together is what routers do. If so, it's not surprising you cannot access the ISP gateway (indeed, if your "gateway" is modem, it may not even have an IP address - modems don't need them.)

With the "right" equipment, this may be fixable with some additional configuration effort, but it rather depends on what you've got and what it is capable of. A lot of SOHO kit is (deliberately) kept simple and may not avail the required facilities.
 

Ronm

Standard Member
Hi mickevh
Thank you so much for taking the trouble to reply really appreciate it. The gateway is provided by my ISP says technicolor on the front made specially for my ISP in China probably so won't be of much help. Functions as a modem, router and wifi with four ethernet ports. One of these is connected to my velop, if I use any of the other ports I can access the settings login page by typing the 192.168 ... IP address to alter settings etc. but if I'm connected via wifi [ie using the velop] or with one of the ethernet ports on the velop I cannot access the gateway. Seems to me there are two seperate networks, one for the gateway and the velop creates another separate network for WIFI and anything connected to its ports. It seems there is no communication between them.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
That sounds like your Technicolor device is a router and your Velop is also functioning as a router. If so, then you have indeed got two separate networks.

ISP---TC---VLOP---everything else.

If you were to examine devices as they are connected to both networks, they will almost certainly have different IP subnet ranges. Possibly variants of 192.168.X.Y (though there are other options.) I'd guess that the "X" value differs on the two networks.

For the purposes of illustration, I'll make up some IP addresses, yours will almost certainly be different: So for the purposes of debate let's assume that the subnet downstream of the TC is 192.168.200.Y (subnet mask 255.255.255.0) and the the subnet downstream of the Velop is 192.168.99.Y (subnet mask 255.255.255.0.) There is structure in IP addresses and the subnet mask tells devices (such as routers) how to interpret that structure.

To access the TC from the Velop, you may need to create something on the Velop called a "static route" that tell the Velop where it can find the 192.168.200.Y network, though if the "external IP" address bound to the Velop "WAN" interface is 192.168.200.Y it should already have such a route generated automatically. The key thing is to check the routing table in the Velop and see what it has. However, not all cheap SOHO kit will let you do this.

Thence it's possible you have to get past the firewall in the Velop. 192.168.X.Y IP addresses are not valid for transmission across the public Internet and most kit will automatically drop any traffic addressed to such addresses. So it may be that you have to tell the Velop to permit any traffic addressed to the TC to egress from the Velop WAN interface (and possibly allow any replies coming back in for the similar reasons - such traffic should not be arriving at the WAN port, so it may be dropped for security reasons.)

I don't know any of this kit, so it's a case of digging out the manuals and seeing what it can do.

Alternatively, if it offers it, you could use the Velop system just as a Wi-Fi system and run a single subnet - some kit calls this things like "AP mode"or "bridge mode." However, that may defeat some of the "good stuff" in the Velop system (e.g. parental controls, prioritisation, guest network, etc. etc. - how big a deal that is depends on what features you want to use.) "AP/Bridge mode" effectively turns off the router/NAT/Firewall in the Velop system so it just runs as a fleet of managed Wi-Fi Access Points.

If you want to post up you actual IP addresses, we can perhaps advise what your real numbers need to be. It is safe to disclose your IP addressing scheme publicly as 192.168.X.Y IP addresses are not telling anyone anything useful.
 
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Ronm

Standard Member
Mickevh
Wow! that's one hell of an explanation. With my very limited knowledge of networking etc. much of what you say is way over my head. The gateway ip address for login is http://192.168.1.254/ the velop subnet mask says 255.255.255.0. There's nothing I can see on the velop dashboard [phone app to control velop] that can enable AP/Bridge mode. The LAN ip address of the velop is 10.143.1.1 but it also says connection type PPPoE IP address 178.208... which is nothing like the IP addresses from the gateway which all start with 192.168...
I have no idea if I am making any sense, but thank you for your effort.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
That makes sense, it's just the addresses that are a little different.

That suggests the network between the TC and the Velop is 192.168.1.0 / 255.255.255.0 and the "internal" network downstream of the Velop is 10.0.0.0 / 255.255.255.0. Which is fine, both those address ranges are what's known as "private" which means they will never be found on the public Internet.

The PPPoE address is the address the device uses to establish the link to your ISP. PPP is a networking protocol that is often used by ISP;s to establish the link between a customer and their network infrastructure. (The "oE" means "over ethernet" - there's another version "oA" meaing "over ADSL" - which is used depends on the type of service delivery you have and the ISP preference.)

So the "fix" required is much as I've described - you may need to tell your Velop to send traffic addressed to 192.168.1.Y out of it's "WAN" interface, if it has not done so automatically, using something called a "static route" and probably need to set up some access controls and/or port forwarding rules to allow traffic from 192.168.1.254 back in through the Velop WAN Interface. Also, maybe something to permit outbound traffic to 192.168.1.254 as that may be blocked/dropped by default.

The biggest hassle is, much cheap SOHO equipment that's designed to be highly automated and "just work" out of the box lacks the facilities to do this, so you may be stuck with the status quo.

I am in similar situation in that my ISP supplies a box they call a "modem" which terminated the incoming line but has an IP address I could use to examine things like the line stats and I have a router downstream of it which blocks access to the modem. And I can't be bothered to "fix" it because it's all working fine.

It's worth mentioning that a lot if networking equipment does not need an IP address to "work." Often the IP address/interface is only provided to avail access to the admin functions. HomePlugs, Wi-Fi Access Points, ethernet switches (to cite just three examples) are such.
 

Ronm

Standard Member
Mickevh
Thanks again for your continued support. Like you, I only need access to my gateway if I need to check any stats or activate or switch off the WIFI (as I have done now since I am using the velop). Again like you, everything is working fine so bit hesitant to tamper with too many settings that might screw up something else for a facility that I will not be using that often. With that in mind, what I intend doing is using one of the ports in an Ethernet switch I have connected to the gateway, when I want to tamper with the gateway i'll connect that cable to my laptop, use the gateway network, do whatever is needed and then use the WiFi to access the internet etc. via the velop network.
Thank you so much for all your information and advice. To be honest I've learned quite a bit about networking and how how these systems work, so in that sense this investigation has been very worthwhile.
Cheers
Ron
 

deebo

Active Member
I had similar issues when setting up my Velop system. Can you place your ISP gateway into modem mode? That may help if you can. Alternatively, you may need to setup 2 different address ranges.

e.g. Your ISP Gateway can be on network 192.168.0.X
Your Velop network can be on network 192.168.1.Y

This is how mine is setup and it works perfectly.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
I had similar issues when setting up my Velop system. Can you place your ISP gateway into modem mode? That may help if you can. Alternatively, you may need to setup 2 different address ranges.

e.g. Your ISP Gateway can be on network 192.168.0.X
Your Velop network can be on network 192.168.1.Y

This is how mine is setup and it works perfectly.

Thanks.

OP already has got two different address ranges both of which are private IP addresses. There's no great significance that one of them (his internal one) is 10.0.0.Y, functionally it's doing the same as yours so changing the internal IP address range would make no difference.

In IP internetworking, each separate network must have a different and unique address range and both of you already have established such, it's just that you've used different options from the "private" IP address ranges. What the actually address ranges are doesn't much matter as long as they're different.

Private IP addresses are a set of ranges defined by IANA that will never be granted for use on the public Internet, so you see them used everywhere for internal network. There's basically three sets available - 10.0.0.0/8 which will give you an address space of around 16.7 million, 172.16.0.0-172.31.255.255 which will give you an address space of around a million and the 192.168.X.Y which yields an address space of around 65 thousand. For little SOHO networks we often subnet these into address spaces of 256 as most SOHO's are unlikely to ever need the bigger address space, but we use them in big "corporate" networks.
 

deebo

Active Member
mickevh, I'm fully aware of the address ranges, though the explanation could be useful for the OP. Thanks.

Ronm, the address ranges given in my reply can be used or changed, it's up to you. I have given a better explanation in the post I linked. I know the Velop system isn't very easy to setup, though it should be fine if you follow the steps setup in my previous link.
 

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