Help with internet to new detached garage

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by SteveRSF, Oct 26, 2017.

  1. SteveRSF

    SteveRSF
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2003
    Messages:
    270
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Ratings:
    +2
    Guys sorry if been asked before i have looked through many posts but am geting more confused
    I have bt hub6 router in the house that we use for usual things for pc ps4 xbox smartphones etc
    Now we have built a new detached garage around 20m away at the bottom of the garden that we would like internet in too for lightwave rf goodies ,music etc
    I did try bt hotspot plugs with no joy......any other suggestions?

    Garage has its own new consumer unit etc but is fed from the main house supply
    Any help much apriciated guys
     
  2. sep8001

    sep8001
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2008
    Messages:
    2,712
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Ratings:
    +301
    Hi

    Not sure if this would work, but have tried a homeplug route?
     
  3. mickevh

    mickevh
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2007
    Messages:
    7,225
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    West London
    Ratings:
    +1,738
    if you can't "bury" a conduit containing "proper" ethernet cables and HomePlugs won't work, then something like a point-to-point Wi-Fi link is probably the only other (cheap) option, providing there's decent line of sight. I've seen some laser based solutions also, but they are probably going to be a bit on the expensive side for what you're after.
     
  4. SteveRSF

    SteveRSF
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2003
    Messages:
    270
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Ratings:
    +2
    Yes tried bt hotspot plug ins but no joy ,is that the best option cat5e cable in conduit ? If so what is used then in the garage for wifi?
     
  5. sep8001

    sep8001
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2008
    Messages:
    2,712
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Ratings:
    +301
    You can have another router which can become a repeater from the main one. Might be worth trying some cheap homeplugs and an old router before you look at laying a cable.
     
  6. Puntoboy

    Puntoboy
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2008
    Messages:
    584
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Location:
    Kettering
    Ratings:
    +76
    I had a similar situation but my garage wasn’t quite that far. I buried a 25mm conduit out to the garage and ran 3 cat 6 cables. One for Internet, one for a PoE CCTV camera and one spare.
     
  7. degsod

    degsod
    Active Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2012
    Messages:
    431
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Ratings:
    +75
    You could use a directional wifi antenna at each location
     
  8. Chris Muriel

    Chris Muriel
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2002
    Messages:
    7,280
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Location:
    Manchester
    Ratings:
    +763
    Provided the 2 transceivers (e.g. WAPs or repeaters) both have external aerial inputs / detachable antennas rather than built in.
     
  9. SteveRSF

    SteveRSF
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2003
    Messages:
    270
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Ratings:
    +2
    Any links to exactly what you mean chris?
     
  10. degsod

    degsod
    Active Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2012
    Messages:
    431
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Ratings:
    +75
    They can be bought on line. I would always go hardwired over wifi. I have used the unify external products to connect two buildings over a main road
     
  11. Chester

    Chester
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2003
    Messages:
    3,750
    Products Owned:
    3
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    137
    Location:
    Peterborough, Cambs, UK
    Ratings:
    +730
    If cabling isn't possible, you could use something like airMAX. I've used this for an Internet service at a distance of 400m, but they're designed to provide services over several kilometres! Worked a treat. I'll be putting in another one in the coming months.
     
  12. Chris Muriel

    Chris Muriel
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2002
    Messages:
    7,280
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Location:
    Manchester
    Ratings:
    +763
  13. mickevh

    mickevh
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2007
    Messages:
    7,225
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    West London
    Ratings:
    +1,738
    Cabled ethernet is nearly always better than Wi-Fi, not least because ethernet is almost always "Full Duplex" these days, which Wi-Fi can never be.

    The "thing" you need to attach to end of the cables to avail an additional Wi-Fi cell is called an "Access Point." All Infrastructure mode Wi-Fi is facilitated by AP's - there's an AP built in to a SOHO get-you-on-the-Internet omni-box. "Routers" are not necessary to "do Wi-Fi." However, if you want to use a SOHO router as an AP or combination AP/switch, you can do so by "crippling" it. How to do so is described in the "Using Two Routers Together" FAQ pinned in this forum. (Of course, if you've got an "old" router lying around, using it as an AP could save you some money.)
     
  14. dannnielll

    dannnielll
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2017
    Messages:
    2,127
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    ireland
    Ratings:
    +903

    It is probably the new consumer unit which is killing the hotplug signal. If you replaced it by simple fuses it might be ok. . But that depends where it is linked into the main domestic supply.
    Ethernet cable over 20 30 metres is no problem for a patch cable and even maplins have ready made relatively low cost ones with connectors moulded in place, if you need a longer length, a coupler can be used.. these can be put inside either conduit. And expected to be buried. ... The French have a standard flexible one which can be buried, a garden hose!! Or say that black PVC water mains pipe which will have lifetime of 70 years...
    Using a real wired cable is much much better than any wireless option.
     
  15. neilball

    neilball
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2005
    Messages:
    2,933
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    Scottish Borders
    Ratings:
    +648
    If you can run a cable then do, it will give you the best performance. You can get armoured cat5e which can be buried at a shallow depth without additional protection/conduit. I bought a cut length of armoured Cat5e from TLC online to run from my garage to a new shed I built recently. I was happy to terminate the cable myself using a metal back box with the correct sized glands for the backbox and cable.

    If that’s going going to be too much hassle then a point-to-point 5Ghz WiFi Bridge would work well too. Look at a couple of Ubiquiti Nanostation 5s or the equivalent from Solwise (they supply a similar product from Engenius and also give decent post-sales support if you need help getting it going).
     
  16. SteveRSF

    SteveRSF
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2003
    Messages:
    270
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Ratings:
    +2
    Think I will just run a cable or cables down either armoured or in ducting
    But keep it simple guys what attaches to the end? Can run it up to a box then what another router best or access point?
     
  17. neilball

    neilball
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2005
    Messages:
    2,933
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    Scottish Borders
    Ratings:
    +648
    You fit an RJ45 module/faceplate ate each end (punch down terminations). If it’s an armoured Cable you also need to fit a suitable gland to terminate the armoured strands at each end. I used a metal clad back box and faceplate for my armoured cat5e run.
     
  18. Chester

    Chester
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2003
    Messages:
    3,750
    Products Owned:
    3
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    137
    Location:
    Peterborough, Cambs, UK
    Ratings:
    +730
    @SteveRSF Glad you've decided on the cabling route. It is always the best option if it can be done.

    You've seen links to using a 2nd router. If you don't have one, something like the Draytek AP902 is perfect. It's a WiFi AP (Access Point) that has 4 sockets for the same physical network, so 1 uplink to the house, and 3 wired devices. Wall mountable too, and can offer a temperature monitoring facility (never used this myself) which may be useful for an outbuilding.
     
  19. Chester

    Chester
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2003
    Messages:
    3,750
    Products Owned:
    3
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    137
    Location:
    Peterborough, Cambs, UK
    Ratings:
    +730
    Here's another AP just released for use in the home that looks rather neat, the airCube. Looking forward to playing with one of these.
     
  20. dannnielll

    dannnielll
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2017
    Messages:
    2,127
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    ireland
    Ratings:
    +903
    Armoured cable is probably overkill. There are no hazardous voltages or currents in cat5 cable. Using one of the flexible conduits for waterproofing and burying it would do then feed the signals into either a AP or a discarded router .. recycling centres full of them and you have wireless in the remote licarion. Nothing wrong with armoured cable of course...just price.
     
  21. SteveRSF

    SteveRSF
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2003
    Messages:
    270
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Ratings:
    +2
    Yep picked up 300m of cat5e today ,so will do a few runs through ducting think it’s the best in the long run
    Will let you know how I get on ,mini digger hopefully on Friday so can dig a trench for drainage too
    Thanks for all the replies guys
     
  22. Puntoboy

    Puntoboy
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2008
    Messages:
    584
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Location:
    Kettering
    Ratings:
    +76
    I took the opportunity to run a cold water pipe to my garage at the same time. Useful for car washing [emoji1360]
     
  23. mickevh

    mickevh
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2007
    Messages:
    7,225
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    West London
    Ratings:
    +1,738
    If you are going to install into conduit/pipes, it's worth considering leaving a "draw string" in situ. They can be useful for pulling through additional/replacement cables in the future.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • List
  24. neilball

    neilball
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2005
    Messages:
    2,933
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    Scottish Borders
    Ratings:
    +648
    I like armoured cable when you don’t intend to bury the cable deep, just for the improved mechanical protection it offers. Nothing wrong with using ducting either, just make sure you keep it protected from damage by crushing.
     

Share This Page

Loading...