Question Help with graphics card

bilalbilal

Active Member
That’s a 4 pin connector not 2 pin and no you can’t use it, it’s a 2nd cpu power connector as some motherboard cpu combo”s require a 8 pin connection.

Are there no other cables and connectors coming from the PSU ?
Thank for pointing that out, this so called local Leicester lockdown is getting to me!

Not any that I can find like that, no! And I've built computers in the past so I know what the GPU connection is like. I guess that means I'm stuck and can only get a 6 pin GPU now? :facepalm:

I was seriously considering the rx570/580/590 series and now this.
Some YouTubers said a 6 pin will do?
I've seen negative vibes about an adaptor, but seems to be mixed opinions. Available on eBay for the £2ish mark...like this PCI Express PCIE 6 Pin to 8 Pin Graphics Card Power Adapter Cable for Nvidia | eBay

If I can only get a 6 pin GPU, how does the Nvidia gtx 1060 6gb seem? Seems like the only one within my budget and 6 pin. Or any other suggestions and advise will be much appreciated.

Thanks!

Also still not sure whether it'll fit, on my previous second question......
 
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EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
I've seen negative vibes about an adaptor, but seems to be mixed opinions. Available on eBay for the £2ish mark...like this PCI Express PCIE 6 Pin to 8 Pin Graphics Card Power Adapter Cable for Nvidia | eBay

That's an ebay special so avoid at all costs. There's a reason for the extra 2-pins

The best adapter is a 2x Molex to PCI-E 8-pin although I'd only want to use it in this case if the molex connectors were on a seperate rail to the 6-pin, which might be tricky information to find on what looks like an unbranded PSU (it can be hard to find for even the less communicative brand names like corsair).

I think the GTX 1060 was about the oldest nVidia card to get Freesync support so that might be an option. It was never particularly good value new, but second hand it might be better.

I think some of the RX 470s have a 6-pin connector.

Have the 5500XTs come down in price to nearly match the RX 570/580 yet?

Also still not sure whether it'll fit, on my previous second question......

Depends on the exact card, not just the GPU it uses.
 

bilalbilal

Active Member
That's an ebay special so avoid at all costs. There's a reason for the extra 2-pins
eBay special LOL
Thanks for that I was totally unsure
What's the reason then lol?

[/QUOTE]

The best adapter is a 2x Molex to PCI-E 8-pin although I'd only want to use it in this case if the molex connectors were on a seperate rail to the 6-pin, which might be tricky information to find on what looks like an unbranded PSU (it can be hard to find for even the less communicative brand names like corsair).
Don't have a clue what that means. Could you kindly elaborate? And what will happen if I do.

I think the GTX 1060 was about the oldest nVidia card to get Freesync support so that might be an option. It was never particularly good value new, but second hand it might be better.
What's freesync lol?

I think some of the RX 470s have a 6-pin connector.

Have the 5500XTs come down in price to nearly match the RX 570/580 yet?
No they're still very expensive
Is the rx 470 any good?

Depends on the exact card, not just the GPU it uses.
A bit lost by what you mean sorry.

EDIT:
My brother went to see the seller today. Turns out it cost him £480 or something in total as he paid ridiculous prices for new components, including £150 for the same monitor I got for £100 new! He showed all the receipts to my brother and is not lying. He's a laptop dealer so not clued on with desktops at all and done it as a "favour" for my dad.

Anyway, He suggested this Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1050 Ti 4GB Boost Graphics Card - GV-N105TD5-4GD | CCL Computers

Thoughts?
 
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EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
eBay special LOL
Thanks for that I was totally unsure
What's the reason then lol?

They were introduced at the same time with the 6-pin one designed to be a mainstream connector providing 75W and the 8-pin one for special use/workstations and so on providing 150W.

If you try and draw 150W from a cable and connectors designed for 75W you often end up with magic smoke and the aroma of melting plastic.

Don't have a clue what that means. Could you kindly elaborate? And what will happen if I do.

That PSU essentially has two sets of 19A supplies with the different wires plugged into different amounts so if you draw more than 19A from cables wired into the same one it should trip the over-current protection and cut power every time the PC tries to draw that much.

Assuming the over-current protection works well on the unbranded PSU then there's not much chance of any damage, it'd just be wasted money.

What's freesync lol?

The most widely supported implementation of variable refresh rate. A screen technology that allows games to appear smoother at the same frame rate. Basically a performance boost that doesn't require a faster CPU or graphics card.

If it's a new 'gaming' monitor it'll be supported on this screen (although if it's only for HDMI you'll need an AMD card, nVidia ones only work with DisplayPort implementations).

No they're still very expensive
Is the rx 470 any good?

Same design as the RX 570/580/590 but slightly lower clocks and a couple more disabled shaders. The RX 570 was a refresh of the 470 and the performance boost was around 10%.

A bit lost by what you mean sorry.

The 'RX 570' and so on refer to the big chip in the middle of the graphics card known as the GPU which is the bit designed by AMD or nVidia. They also set some rules about what speeds you can run the chip, how much memory you have to provide and so on to ensure comparable performance.

The card itself with all of the supporting components, cooling system and so on is designed by companies such as MSI, XFX, Gigabyte etc.

So cards with the same GPU can have different shapes and layouts. Sometimes graphics cards are referred to as GPUs as well, it depends on context.

You may know this from past experience, but I thought it worth pointing out.

My brother went to see the seller today. Turns out it cost him £480 or something in total as he paid ridiculous prices for new components, including £150 for the same monitor I got for £100 new! He showed all the receipts to my brother and is not lying. He's a laptop dealer so not clued on with desktops at all and done it as a "favour" for my dad.

Yeah, incompetence is much more common than malice. He just hasn't recognised his own lack of knowledge on the subject, it's easily done.


About 70% of the performance of a 570, so not great at that price.
 

bilalbilal

Active Member
They were introduced at the same time with the 6-pin one designed to be a mainstream connector providing 75W and the 8-pin one for special use/workstations and so on providing 150W.

If you try and draw 150W from a cable and connectors designed for 75W you often end up with magic smoke and the aroma of melting plastic.
Thanks, that made me feel better:rotfl:

That PSU essentially has two sets of 19A supplies with the different wires plugged into different amounts so if you draw more than 19A from cables wired into the same one it should trip the over-current protection and cut power every time the PC tries to draw that much.

Assuming the over-current protection works well on the unbranded PSU then there's not much chance of any damage, it'd just be wasted money.
So is it worth trying the molex to 8 pin adaptor?

The most widely supported implementation of variable refresh rate. A screen technology that allows games to appear smoother at the same frame rate. Basically a performance boost that doesn't require a faster CPU or graphics card.

If it's a new 'gaming' monitor it'll be supported on this screen (although if it's only for HDMI you'll need an AMD card, nVidia ones only work with DisplayPort implementations).
I see. I can't find the exact model of the monitor so can't be sure.

Same design as the RX 570/580/590 but slightly lower clocks and a couple more disabled shaders. The RX 570 was a refresh of the 470 and the performance boost was around 10%.
ok thanks...
The 'RX 570' and so on refer to the big chip in the middle of the graphics card known as the GPU which is the bit designed by AMD or nVidia. They also set some rules about what speeds you can run the chip, how much memory you have to provide and so on to ensure comparable performance.

The card itself with all of the supporting components, cooling system and so on is designed by companies such as MSI, XFX, Gigabyte etc.

So cards with the same GPU can have different shapes and layouts. Sometimes graphics cards are referred to as GPUs as well, it depends on context.

You may know this from past experience, but I thought it worth pointing out.
i didn't, thanks. i was totally baffed by all these different models!

Yeah, incompetence is much more common than malice. He just hasn't recognised his own lack of knowledge on the subject, it's easily done.
and he still doesn't want to admit....

About 70% of the performance of a 570, so not great at that price.
what would you recommend then? i'm totally confused...
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
If the power adapter doesn't work you're looking at a new PSU which is maybe £35-40.

When buying for something else I'd lean towards whatever maximised reliability and the chance of it working so I'd personally probably go for an RX 5500 XT. It's £25 more than an RX 570 and a power adaptor - although the 50W lower power consumption should save ~£2.50 a year assuming an hour of gaming a day (and it's more environmentally friendly).

But going for the RX 570 and replacing the power supply if necessary or going for a second hand single 6-pin card like an RX 470 are all reasonable options too.
 

bilalbilal

Active Member
If the power adapter doesn't work you're looking at a new PSU which is maybe £35-40.

When buying for something else I'd lean towards whatever maximised reliability and the chance of it working so I'd personally probably go for an RX 5500 XT. It's £25 more than an RX 570 and a power adaptor - although the 50W lower power consumption should save ~£2.50 a year assuming an hour of gaming a day (and it's more environmentally friendly).

But going for the RX 570 and replacing the power supply if necessary or going for a second hand single 6-pin card like an RX 470 are all reasonable options too.
I just bought this for £130 - geforce gtx 1060 6gb - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB Graphics Card | eBay
seems to be going used for £150ish. Has a 6 pin connector so no PSU headache and gives around 100 FPS on 1080p (little brother plays on 1080p, monitor is only 1080p) according to YouTube...
Dimensions seem ok as well....

However then got offered this amd Radeon Rx 5500xt for £155 lol - Amd Rx 5500xt 8gb | eBay

It's £185 new on Amazon....Amazon product
But then I read this about the molex to 8 pin connector....

Do you think it's safe and worth the extra for the extra performance?.....and do you think it's worth spending the extra £30 for brand new or £30 less for a one month old one lol

Thanks

P.s. from here - RX 5500 XT 8GB vs GTX 1060 6GB Game Performance Benchmarks (i7-8700K vs i7-6700K) - GPUCheck United States / USA.
"Our Verdict: Upgrading from GTX 1060 6GB to RX 5500 XT 8GB is not recommended as it is less than 30% of improvement in performance. In general, a reasonable upgrade is between 30% and 50% or more to justify the purchase of new hardware."

but as I'm not a gamer, that doesn't mean anything to me, and I need help lol!!!
 
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EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
Once upon a time virtually every high end card included a Molex to 8-pin adapter the box, e.g.

While you do need to exercise some caution with them, it's definitely reasonable for molex connector to provide 75W. A 3.5" hard drive can draw 30-40W on startup and molex connectors are generally provided in chains of two or three so on most PSUs the wires can handle that load.

Do you think it's safe and worth the extra for the extra performance?.....and do you think it's worth spending the extra £30 for brand new or £30 less for a one month old one lol

The performance simulation site is talking about the costs of replacing an already owned card rather than deciding between two new ones so the guidance isn't that relevant here.

But if you've already bought the GTX 1060 then that's fine, it's probably not worth incurring the cost of returning it.
 

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