Question Help with graphics card

bilalbilal

Active Member
Hi everyone!

So basically, I used to be a pc geek and build computers back in the day, but during studies gave it a break, and never went back.
Been ten years since :facepalm:

But now need some advice....

My little brother (who doesn't live with me!) went and had a gaming pc custom built....brand new with monitor and gaming accessories....for £550....

But the specs are, well to Me, rubbish, lol.

He's getting a maximum of 40FPS on Fortnite!

So I suggested getting a new graphics card, but so much has changed I'm baffled.I'veattached screenshots of the speccy specifications for help.

question is - how do I know which graphics card will support the motherboard in his computer and have things changed from PCI?

google has too much?!? Lol

and can anyone recommend a good graphics card - prefer buying a used one that's better rather than a new cheap one.
The
MSI NVIDIA GTX 970
Seems ok.....but not sure if it will work?

It has to be more than 60fps as that what's he gets on his PS4.

Budget is around £100
Recommendations?
Thanks
 

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tickedon

Well-known Member
My little brother (who doesn't live with me!) went and had a gaming pc custom built....brand new with monitor and gaming accessories....for £550....
The CPU in the attached screenshot was launched in 2014 and discontinued by Intel in 2017. It is a very old spec and seems to use some HP components, you wouldn't get those 'new' right now... where did your brother buy it from, and when? I worry he has been ripped off or isn't telling you the truth...
 

bilalbilal

Active Member
The CPU in the attached screenshot was launched in 2014 and discontinued by Intel in 2017. It is a very old spec and seems to use some HP components, you wouldn't get those 'new' right now... where did your brother buy it from, and when? I worry he has been ripped off or isn't telling you the truth...
My dad's friend built it for him who is usually trustworthy, I've bought laptops from him before, but I had exactly the same question. The guy claimed to have bought All components new (except motherboard) and only made £60 profit...anyway as the pc was custom built, theirs no turning back now, so need advice on the graphics card....
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
Someone's been massively ripped off, either your brother or your father's friend. Most of those components date from 2013ish and machines like that typically cost around £150-200 (from a reputable second hand company with a warranty).

Custom built wouldn't be relevant here if you wanted to pursue it but it sounds like you don't want to make waves.


The first thing to check is the case and power supply. There's no point in looking at an old high end card like a GTX 970 if it won't fit in the case, or the PSU is an extremely cheap model that doesn't have the power for it.

There's obviously a PCI-E 16x slot as the GT710 is using it but it may only take half height (aka low profile) cards. You can't find that from the specs other than looking up the model of the PC, but it's easy to identify in a photo and the measurements for PCI/PCI-E cards are available online if you want to measure up yourself.

Card length is worth checking too, most of these are ex-business PCs so won't necessarily accomodate a particularly long card.

Power supply capability also isn't available via spec programs, you'll need to check the label on the side of the PSU. Graphics cards draw power at 12V so that's the capacity you're interested in.


In terms of card choice if you've got the space and capacity then something like an R9 390 will be a slightly faster choice than a GTX 970, although potentially a bit noisier depending on which card you get.

Obviously the old, low power (S suffix) CPU will hold you back somewhat, but a good improvement from the integrated graphics/GT710 is available.
 

next010

Distinguished Member
Another thing from your specs picture it lists the system as 8GB single channel DDR3 RAM, check if there are two RAM sticks in the PC, either open it up or use CPU-Z and go to memory tab it will list if more than one stick.

If there are not and only one that will hurt performance as the system RAM is not running in dual channel mode.
 

bilalbilal

Active Member
Someone's been massively ripped off, either your brother or your father's friend. Most of those components date from 2013ish and machines like that typically cost around £150-200 (from a reputable second hand company with a warranty).

Custom built wouldn't be relevant here if you wanted to pursue it but it sounds like you don't want to make waves.


The first thing to check is the case and power supply. There's no point in looking at an old high end card like a GTX 970 if it won't fit in the case, or the PSU is an extremely cheap model that doesn't have the power for it.

There's obviously a PCI-E 16x slot as the GT710 is using it but it may only take half height (aka low profile) cards. You can't find that from the specs other than looking up the model of the PC, but it's easy to identify in a photo and the measurements for PCI/PCI-E cards are available online if you want to measure up yourself.

Card length is worth checking too, most of these are ex-business PCs so won't necessarily accomodate a particularly long card.

Power supply capability also isn't available via spec programs, you'll need to check the label on the side of the PSU. Graphics cards draw power at 12V so that's the capacity you're interested in.


In terms of card choice if you've got the space and capacity then something like an R9 390 will be a slightly faster choice than a GTX 970, although potentially a bit noisier depending on which card you get.

Obviously the old, low power (S suffix) CPU will hold you back somewhat, but a good improvement from the integrated graphics/GT710 is available.
Yes, I kind of figured out that my dad may have been ripped off. It's his "friend" that built it for him, not really much of a friend but just someone he knows who sells laptops and desktops. He's generally trustworthy and gives good cheap prices, I've bought laptops from him before (and I know my laptops), and he gives good customer support....and when my elder brother who works in currys and knows his desktops (but is too busy with work lol), he said I'm only making £60 profit as I've ordered components new and it's now too late as my dad had already ordered then! Anyway.

You're right, I don't want to make a fuss, but basically my dad doesn't know anything about tech, neither does my little brother (who the gaming pc was for)...I told the kid to wait and be patient but he didn't listen like a typical 15 year old, as he was finding used machines + gaming sets for £5-600 and this was "brand new" apparently for £550 with a gaming keyboard and pc and a 24" curved monitor. The monitor keyboard etc was definitely brand new....and the pc case....but I had my doubts about the components myself as soon as I seen the specs!

As for the case, it's a new gaming one hes bought with lights etc (full size desktop).
I'll check the PSU.....things are coming back to me now lol!!!

The S suffix thing I didn't know about. What's the best processor this motherboard will support then? Is it worth upgrading the CPU along with the graphics card? This crook said he'll give £40 back if we give him the graphics card back, so maybe will get something for the CPU we well. Thanks for your help...

Another thing from your specs picture it lists the system as 8GB single channel DDR3 RAM, check if there are two RAM sticks in the PC, either open it up or use CPU-Z and go to memory tab it will list if more than one stick.

If there are not and only one that will hurt performance as the system RAM is not running in dual channel mode.
As far as I know it's just one 8gb stick...how much difference will that really make? Is it worth buying another 8gb stick then?
Thanks for your help also
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
The three best models Intel made for that socket were the 5775C, the 5675C and the 4790/4790k.

It appears even the cheapest of those is currently selling for £100+

And that's not even a particularly big upgrade over the 4590S, maybe 15-20%.

If you wanted to go down that route you'd be better off buying a new budget motherboard (£40-50) and a mainstream CPU like an i3-9100F or Ryzen 3200G for £70-80. Cheaper memory too, 8GB DDR4 sticks are cheaper than 8GB DDR3 sticks.


and it's now too late as my dad had already ordered then!

A custom made product from a business (which this now sou does mean you lose any right to reject it because you change your mind.

However, you still have your consumer rights that a product be as described and fit for the purpose it was sold for. If it's not then it's up to the seller to make it right or offer a refund.

If it'd come in decked out in a my little pony game themed livery and your bother wasn't a fan then tough, unless he specified the looks when it was ordered then there'd be nothing you could do except change the affected parts.

But if the order was for a gaming PC that could play all the latest games, run games faster than a PS4 or had all new parts then that's not what has been delivered and it's the seller's responsibility to fix it at their expense, or offer other remediation like a refund.

I don't know exactly what was discussed in terms of requirements or capabilities when it was ordered but as you've been brought in I'm guessing the results aren't what your brother and father were led to expect they'd be.

Obviously as someone hearing a second hand account I can't judge how accurately the PC fulfills whatever requirements were set by your father and brother. If they insisted on as many new parts as possible, had to have the fancy peripherals and only asked for it to play a few specific games then it may satisfy the given criteria.

But if the PC doesn't meet what was agreed or was represented as much more capable than it is then it's definitely not too late, you as a family do have rights to get it sorted.
 

bilalbilal

Active Member
The three best models Intel made for that socket were the 5775C, the 5675C and the 4790/4790k.

It appears even the cheapest of those is currently selling for £100+

And that's not even a particularly big upgrade over the 4590S, maybe 15-20%.

If you wanted to go down that route you'd be better off buying a new budget motherboard (£40-50) and a mainstream CPU like an i3-9100F or Ryzen 3200G for £70-80. Cheaper memory too, 8GB DDR4 sticks are cheaper than 8GB DDR3 sticks.




A custom made product from a business (which this now sou does mean you lose any right to reject it because you change your mind.

However, you still have your consumer rights that a product be as described and fit for the purpose it was sold for. If it's not then it's up to the seller to make it right or offer a refund.

If it'd come in decked out in a my little pony game themed livery and your bother wasn't a fan then tough, unless he specified the looks when it was ordered then there'd be nothing you could do except change the affected parts.

But if the order was for a gaming PC that could play all the latest games, run games faster than a PS4 or had all new parts then that's not what has been delivered and it's the seller's responsibility to fix it at their expense, or offer other remediation like a refund.

I don't know exactly what was discussed in terms of requirements or capabilities when it was ordered but as you've been brought in I'm guessing the results aren't what your brother and father were led to expect they'd be.

Obviously as someone hearing a second hand account I can't judge how accurately the PC fulfills whatever requirements were set by your father and brother. If they insisted on as many new parts as possible, had to have the fancy peripherals and only asked for it to play a few specific games then it may satisfy the given criteria.

But if the PC doesn't meet what was agreed or was represented as much more capable than it is then it's definitely not too late, you as a family do have rights to get it sorted.
It seems like theirs no point changing the CPU then. The order was for a "gaming pc that will run smooth and play games such as Fortnite smoothly".....

He's not a business as such, it's an individual.
I told my father to ask to return, he refused. He said he will give £40 for the graphics card and offered to put a much better 4gb one for £170! Didn't specify the model, but I don't trust him at all.

I told my father to argue with him that it doesn't meet the specifications you promised. He said you agreed to these specs. And he said people play with on board graphics cards and 1gb graphic cards and I gave you a 2gb.

Yes, it all sound ridiculous I know, but I think it's a one way now. He's not going to budge. He's promised to refund £40 and will take the graphics card back.

What's the best way forward now? Is another 8gb ram stick necessary - how much difference does it make to gaming? (Im totally out of touch with gaming)

As for the graphics card, going to get hold of the pc once possible and take pictures and check the PSU....

It's a fancy gaming shell with lights etc and not bothered about the noise of the graphics card, but I'm guessing theirs enough place to fit a big graphics card.

No specific budget in mind, dad now said will spend whatever it takes to get the pc upto an acceptable standard but I think £1-£150 is ok.

O and my dad told him he spoke to his son and said why didn't you use used parts instead of new, he said apparently used parts cause problems which is nonsense as the motherboard and cpu are used. I always used to buy used components back in the day. Crazy people
 

bilalbilal

Active Member
Went today. Opened the pc up. All are brand new components, I can tell, apart from the motherboard and cpu.the box he gave it in had packaging of the new components etc also.....so explains the rip off price. Removed the graphics card, which he's probably going to return to ebuyer I'm guessing, thus the £40 refund promise.

Anyway, I think the PSU does have 12v support, have a look at the picture. I've also measured the graphics card slot, please have a look if the graphics card you recommended will fit - I googled some dimensions and seems like it will? Just need to confirm with the experts lol.
Also, is that the best graphics card I can get for around the £100 mark used? Don't mind going to £150ish also depending if it's worth upgrading the ram.

As for the ram, is it worth getting another 8gb stick?

Help will be appreciated asap. Thanks.
 

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EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
He's not a business as such, it's an individual.

If he's doing it for profit rather than just selling off his old stuff or doing a one-off favour for a friend or family member then it's considered a business.

What's the best way forward now? Is another 8gb ram stick necessary - how much difference does it make to gaming? (Im totally out of touch with gaming)

It's a tricky one because controlled tests on seven year hardware aren't all that common.

Memory bandwidth does make a difference, but I couldn't tell you if the point where it starts significantly impacting performance in the more demanding games is anywhere close to the bandwidth provided by DDR3-1600 single channel.

I suspect not though. DDR3 was only ditched fairly recently, circa 2016-2017.

A second stick will help make things generally smoother, but may not provide a huge boost.


It's not the 12V support, it's the amount of power available. 38A is 456W, which is reasonable and will work with almost every card on a system like that.

Big cards can be over twice as long as that, hitting lengths of over 30cm so I can't tell length wise, but there's plenty of height there so I guess the length will be good too.


I'd be tempted to just not spend very much at all on older parts. Stick a good enough graphics card to give three or four times the current performance and leave it at that. I'd be more interested to look down and see what's available around £50 rather than going up to £150.

I'm not familiar enough with the second hand market to pick out anything of particular value, but Techpowerup is a good source for performance comparisons as their reviews typically include a wide range of cards. They don't always go back in time a long way in each review, but you can always look up older reviews for that data.
 

bilalbilal

Active Member
If he's doing it for profit rather than just selling off his old stuff or doing a one-off favour for a friend or family member then it's considered a business.
I guess you've got a point. Just that he's not a store or anything, and nothing in writing such as a receipt etc.
I told my dad to "fight it out", but he stays ill and doesn't want headache - he said he'd rather call it a day and spend another £1-£200 and put it down to bad experience.

It's a tricky one because controlled tests on seven year hardware aren't all that common.
Sorry what do you mean by controlled tests? Been out of touch on this for a long time.

Memory bandwidth does make a difference, but I couldn't tell you if the point where it starts significantly impacting performance in the more demanding games is anywhere close to the bandwidth provided by DDR3-1600 single channel.

I suspect not though. DDR3 was only ditched fairly recently, circa 2016-2017.

A second stick will help make things generally smoother, but may not provide a huge boost.
What do you mean by I suspect not - that it would or wouldn't make a difference?
Also we currently got 1600mhz ram, how do I know if the motherboard will support 1800mhz and how much difference does it make?
It's not the 12V support, it's the amount of power available. 38A is 456W, which is reasonable and will work with almost every card on a system like that.
Confused again. Please explain further?
Also how do I tell this from the label on the PSU - can you advice further? Will my PSU work will any graphics card?

Big cards can be over twice as long as that, hitting lengths of over 30cm so I can't tell length wise, but there's plenty of height there so I guess the length will be good too.
Yeh thanks theirs plenty of length as well.

I'd be tempted to just not spend very much at all on older parts. Stick a good enough graphics card to give three or four times the current performance and leave it at that. I'd be more interested to look down and see what's available around £50 rather than going up to £150.
Spoilt son, so father wants to make him happy. Told me he's willing to spend an extra £200 If he can get a 8gb graphics card that will make him happy! Not that he knows anything about the GB, lol [/QUOTE]

I'm not familiar enough with the second hand market to pick out anything of particular value, but Techpowerup is a good source for performance comparisons as their reviews typically include a wide range of cards. They don't always go back in time a long way in each review, but you can always look up older reviews for that data.
Thanks, but could you help me out a bit? I'm totally confused. The r9390 you recommended seems to be giving decent FPS - Google says 90 on Fortnite - he plays Fortnite and Call of duty the most.

So yeh conclusion is I know it's not worth spending on but he's lumbered with it now. But would appreciate if you could answer the above questions. Thanks a lot for your help.
 
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next010

Distinguished Member
Definitely get another DDR3 stick, it's a cheap upgrade that will improve performance (not a huge amount but worth it).

Something like this Crucial DDR3 stick should work, its listed as compatible with the HP motherboard that you have by Crucial, though you can always gamble with cheaper DDR3 offerings.

If wanting to buy new an AMD RX750 is also a good budget GPU sells for around £120, its what Anandtech recommend in that price point, there is an 8GB version of the RX570 for £139.
 

bilalbilal

Active Member
Definitely get another DDR3 stick, it's a cheap upgrade that will improve performance (not a huge amount but worth it).

Something like this Crucial DDR3 stick should work, its listed as compatible with the HP motherboard that you have by Crucial, though you can always gamble with cheaper DDR3 offerings.

If wanting to buy new an AMD RX750 is also a good budget GPU sells for around £120, its what Anandtech recommend in that price point, there is an 8GB version of the RX570 for £139.
Thanks for that!
Not to keen on buying new tbh - or would you recommend buying new as opposed to used? I was thinking of getting a used high spec one rather than a new budget one?
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
Sorry what do you mean by controlled tests? Been out of touch on this for a long time.

Just someone testing it at the same capacity, speed and so on as opposed to anecdotal evidence from upgrades.

What do you mean by I suspect not - that it would or wouldn't make a difference?
Also we currently got 1600mhz ram, how do I know if the motherboard will support 1800mhz and how much difference does it make?

I'm guessing, but I think there will be enough memory bandwidth to not cause a big reduction in frame rate.

1800 is an odd one and you're not likely to find many memory sticks with an SPD/XMP profile at that speed, 1866 was much more common. Unless the HP motherboard offers allows you to set memory frequency manually that support is going to be tricky to use. It's not a large amount anyway

You can always add the memory separately so it might be worth just going for the graphics card first and seeing the results.

Also how do I tell this from the label on the PSU - can you advice further? Will my PSU work will any graphics card?

The power supply label shows the amount of power that the power supply can provide at each voltage as well as a cap on the total power.

Graphics cards draw at +12V so that power supply can provide 38A amp in total at that voltage.

The +12V1 and +12V2 denote that the power supply has two 12V 'rails' and is incapable of providing the full voltage down a single wire. This isn't usually very important in practice as the connectors are limited to less than that. The high power connectors, like the PCI-Express ones for graphics cards, will generally be wired up to separate rails.

The rails may be relevant here if the power supply doesn't provide the connectors for the graphics card you end up with and you need to use an adapter.

It's worth checking, but if it's a new PSU then a lot of 500W ones these days provide a pair of 8-pin PCI-E connectors which is the maximum a single card would use.

Spoilt son, so father wants to make him happy. Told me he's willing to spend an extra £200 If he can get a 8gb graphics card that will make him happy! Not that he knows anything about the GB, lol

Memory capacity is an enduring myth but it's rare to find a card with so little memory it heavily restricts performance in games.

GPU performance is a much more important factor than memory capacity.

But would appreciate if you could answer the above questions. Thanks a lot for your help.

I can have a look. Where would you prefer to buy? Do you want a guaranteed option like CEX or would you rather hunt down the cheapest price on the likes of ebay and deal with the troubleshooting/returns if it doesn't quite work?
 

Greg Hook

Moderator & Reviewer
Ouch!
That's some rip off right there.

Hope you manage to sort it out, but looking at the specs of the 'gaming' pc, you would be better starting off again.
 

bilalbilal

Active Member
Just someone testing it at the same capacity, speed and so on as opposed to anecdotal evidence from upgrades.



I'm guessing, but I think there will be enough memory bandwidth to not cause a big reduction in frame rate.

1800 is an odd one and you're not likely to find many memory sticks with an SPD/XMP profile at that speed, 1866 was much more common. Unless the HP motherboard offers allows you to set memory frequency manually that support is going to be tricky to use. It's not a large amount anyway

You can always add the memory separately so it might be worth just going for the graphics card first and seeing the results.



The power supply label shows the amount of power that the power supply can provide at each voltage as well as a cap on the total power.

Graphics cards draw at +12V so that power supply can provide 38A amp in total at that voltage.

The +12V1 and +12V2 denote that the power supply has two 12V 'rails' and is incapable of providing the full voltage down a single wire. This isn't usually very important in practice as the connectors are limited to less than that. The high power connectors, like the PCI-Express ones for graphics cards, will generally be wired up to separate rails.

The rails may be relevant here if the power supply doesn't provide the connectors for the graphics card you end up with and you need to use an adapter.

It's worth checking, but if it's a new PSU then a lot of 500W ones these days provide a pair of 8-pin PCI-E connectors which is the maximum a single card would use.



Memory capacity is an enduring myth but it's rare to find a card with so little memory it heavily restricts performance in games.

GPU performance is a much more important factor than memory capacity.



I can have a look. Where would you prefer to buy? Do you want a guaranteed option like CEX or would you rather hunt down the cheapest price on the likes of ebay and deal with the troubleshooting/returns if it doesn't quite work?
Thanks for all of that. Rather hunt down the cheapest option and get high performance. Just told my brother to measure inside the case - 33cm length and height 16.8cm so dont have any problems with space and large graphics cards (I hope so) - do capacitors on the motherboard etc come in the way usually?

As for the PSU, not sure about the connections, but hoping it'll be ok.

Btw, would you recommend buying a used graphics card, or think it's better to buy a new budget one like recommended above?

(In general, laptops, mobiles etc, I always go for a few years old high spec rather than new budget, always cost around the same but double performance.....)

I've got my eyes on this one that you recommended
XFX AMD Radeon R9 390 (8GB GDDR5) Graphics Card - BLACK EDITION | eBay

This one also seems good
MSI Armor 2x Nvidia GeForce GTX 980 4gb GDDR5 OC Graphics Card GPU VR Ready. | eBay

Advice?
 

bilalbilal

Active Member
Ouch!
That's some rip off right there.

Hope you manage to sort it out, but looking at the specs of the 'gaming' pc, you would be better starting off again.
I know, but to get my father to understand is another mission! He rather spends another £200 to "turn it into a proper gaming pc"
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
do capacitors on the motherboard etc come in the way usually?

It's been known to happen, but it's a rarity.

Btw, would you recommend buying a used graphics card, or think it's better to buy a new budget one like recommended above?

Second hand prices on cards do seem fairly high at the moment, A GTX 970 performs the same as an RX 570 so if it's £90, which seems a fairly typical ebay sale price, then it's a 25% discount.

Unlike laptops there's not a great deal to graphics cards beside pure performance - there's almost none of the benefits of buying a high end laptop like a better screen or nicer keyboard.

The cooling system on an old high end card would be more capable, but it will also typically be dealing with more heat and will have more wear on the fans - which get noisier with age - so there's no guarantee it'll actually be quieter.

I'd say new cards are worth a look.


Both are not too old and fairly capable so they'd be fine.
 

bilalbilal

Active Member
I'd say new cards are worth a look.

Both are not too old and fairly capable so they'd be fine.
Thanks a lot for your help - really appreciated. The gtx 980 went for a silly £138!

I'm inclining towards this -
Gigabyte AMD Radeon RX 570 8G GAMING MI Mining/Gaming Graphics Card

But then again, theirs an Rx 590 for £150 here which is only 2 months old
XFX RX590P8DFD6 Radeon RX 590 Fatboy 8GB GDDR5 Graphics Card | eBay
edit: this seller has just messaged me that his new graphics card is giving problems so he's keeping it and not selling anymore, but still want advice - thanks

and i also just found this, i really don't understand all these specs on google so need proper advice, sorry.... Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1050 Ti OC (4GB) Graphics Card PCI-E DisplayPort/HDMI/Dual-Link DVI-D *Open Box* -

What's the chances of used graphics cards going wrong? My dad's a "warranty man" If that makes sense, which explains the initial "new" purchase, so don't want any problems after as it'll come back on me. I've never had problems with any used components anyway, so if it means better performance I don't mind the risk. (But not sure about graphics cards used that's why I'm asking - loud noises you mention don't bother me lol)

How much difference will their realistically be between the rx 570/580/590? The rx 570 seems the best bang for buck based on reviews, but as I'm not a gamer the speeds and GB don't mean much to me...

And how much will the i5 rubbish processor limit the graphics card performance between these cards?
 
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EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
and i also just found this, i really don't understand all these specs on google so need proper advice, sorry....

Specs are only relevant when comparing graphics cards using the same GPU design. So for example shader count, clockspeed, memory bandwidth of the 1050ti is only relevent when comparing to other nVidia 10## cards. They can be misleading when comparing to older or newer nVidia designs, and very misleading when comparing to AMD ones.

Stick to frame rates, either in a game being played or across a selection of games.

As I say, techpowerup is my usual go-to source to get an idea of relative performance as they publish graphics comparing the average fps across a selection of games, e.g.
1595354429621.png

From here

What's the chances of used graphics cards going wrong?

Likely very similar to the laptops you're used to when you take away physical wear-related failures (hinges, case, keyboard etc.)

i.e. I couldn't put a number on it. It happens, but not often enough to seriously impact second hand value.

It is generally recommended to avoid any cards that have been run heavily overclocked for a long time as that considerably accelerates the aging.

How much difference will their realistically be between the rx 570/580/590? The rx 570 seems the best bang for buck based on reviews, but as I'm not a gamer the speeds and GB don't mean much to me...

Looks like 25% more from the graph above. I'd call that minor improvement/nice to have level, 75fps instead of 60fps.

And how much will the i5 rubbish processor limit the graphics card performance between these cards?

It varies hugely depending on the game, I don't think Fortnite is very CPU intensive though so I'd expect a 4590S to be able to get a pretty good frame rate.
 
Hi everyone!

So basically, I used to be a pc geek and build computers back in the day, but during studies gave it a break, and never went back.
Been ten years since :facepalm:

But now need some advice....

My little brother (who doesn't live with me!) went and had a gaming pc custom built....brand new with monitor and gaming accessories....for £550....

But the specs are, well to Me, rubbish, lol.

He's getting a maximum of 40FPS on Fortnite!

So I suggested getting a new graphics card, but so much has changed I'm baffled.I'veattached screenshots of the speccy specifications for help.

question is - how do I know which graphics card will support the motherboard in his computer and have things changed from PCI?

google has too much?!? Lol

and can anyone recommend a good graphics card - prefer buying a used one that's better rather than a new cheap one.
The
MSI NVIDIA GTX 970
Seems ok.....but not sure if it will work?

It has to be more than 60fps as that what's he gets on his PS4.

Budget is around £100
Recommendations?
Thanks


Just for a reference, you can use:

pcpartpicker.com

It does not matter if you order from here (This site just aggrgates best prices it can find) BUT it does allow you to put in different PC parts and ensure they are compatible with eachother. Hope that helps and good luck!
 

bilalbilal

Active Member
Specs are
Thanks for your detailed and prompt responses. I'll keep you updated and give you a shout if I need any more help. Thanks!

Just for a reference, you can use:

pcpartpicker.com

It does not matter if you order from here (This site just aggrgates best prices it can find) BUT it does allow you to put in different PC parts and ensure they are compatible with eachother. Hope that helps and good luck!
Thanks :thumbsup:
 

bilalbilal

Active Member
Specs are only relevant when comparing graphics cards using the same GPU design. So for example shader count, clockspeed, memory bandwidth of the 1050ti is only relevent when comparing to other nVidia 10## cards. They can be misleading when comparing to older or newer nVidia designs, and very misleading when comparing to AMD ones.

Stick to frame rates, either in a game being played or across a selection of games.

As I say, techpowerup is my usual go-to source to get an idea of relative performance as they publish graphics comparing the average fps across a selection of games, e.g.
View attachment 1338257
From here



Likely very similar to the laptops you're used to when you take away physical wear-related failures (hinges, case, keyboard etc.)

i.e. I couldn't put a number on it. It happens, but not often enough to seriously impact second hand value.

It is generally recommended to avoid any cards that have been run heavily overclocked for a long time as that considerably accelerates the aging.



Looks like 25% more from the graph above. I'd call that minor improvement/nice to have level, 75fps instead of 60fps.



It varies hugely depending on the game, I don't think Fortnite is very CPU intensive though so I'd expect a 4590S to be able to get a pretty good frame rate.
Does this look good?
 

bilalbilal

Active Member
Right, need some more help!

Just managed to get hold of the PC today and open it up to measure and check PSU connectors etc....
Most GPUs I've seen require an 8 power pin connector
The rubbish 500w PSU he's put only seems to have a 6 pin power connector, with another 2 pin one lurking around next to the CPU fan
If I remember correctly, I can use the 6+2 for the GPU, right? Both are seperate wires from the PSU.
I've added pictures to explain what I mean

Secondly, please see the measurements. It seems theirs enough place to get a 30cm gpu in as well, but how thick are they generally, as theirs ram slots their in the way as well? Would this stop me from putting a full sized graphics card?

Thanks, much appreciated!
 

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CARLOS

Distinguished Member
That’s a 4 pin connector not 2 pin and no you can’t use it, it’s a 2nd cpu power connector as some motherboard cpu combo”s require a 8 pin connection.

Are there no other cables and connectors coming from the PSU ?
 

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