help with audyssey vs manual setup (Marantz NR1506)

MegaKen

Novice Member
Hello, I did the audyssey calibration on my AVR, but need help understanding some aspects:

After I calibrated the room/speakers with audyssey, I went to manual setup and I see that speaker levels are -5.5 and -4.6 (2ch system).

Q1: did audyssey set those up? why are they in the negative? I understand if one was 0 and one was -2 or something, that would make sense to me, but my numbers do not. Can someone explain please?

Q2: if I manually change those levels, does it override the audyssey setup, or add my settings "on top" of what audyssey configured?

Thank you
 

Dolus

Active Member
Audyssey is setting all the speakers so they play at 75dB at the listening position. If your speakers are playing louder than 75dB it will lower the trim level from '0' to a negative number.

Changing the trim levels/distances/crossovers does not override Audyssey.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
Audyssey will set the levels so get a balanced audio where the mic was first placed. Those settings are saved and altering anything under the manual settings will not mean you lose those settings and the room calibration that Audyssey undertakes.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Audyssey is a form of room EQ correction. The balancing and levelling of your speakers as well as the bass management is not something dealt with by Audyssey and is simply something done during the calibration. The resulting speaker levels and distance post calibration would still be in effect uf you turn Audyssey off. Audyssey deals with issues with the room's EQ and acoustics and not the speaker levels and distances.

The calibration levels your speakers so that they attain the same SPL as measured from your primary listening location. They are levelled relative to an indistry regnised reference level of 75db. THe pink noise test tone should measure an SPL of 75db if and when the master volume isset to 0db post calibration. if measured from where the mic was uintially placed during the calibration.

The levels set in the speaker levels settings represenyt gow much the receiver had to boost or limit the signal being output to thosespeakers in order to level them so that they'd all give the same SPL measurement while portating the test tone.

If you change those levels then it has no effect on the room EQ. It will jowever result in your setup being incorrectly levellled iunless you are making such adhustments relative to measurement you yourself are taking using an handheld SPL meter.


Why do you want to change the speaker levels?
 
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MegaKen

Novice Member
Thank you guys for your answers - I understand it now.

Maybe someone can help me with another issue I'm having:

When I switch to 'virtual' surround mode (which sounds great for some tracks) - there's this acute static coming out of the speakers. Only in virtual, other modes are completely quiet. The static starts as soon as i switch to virtual, even when nothing is playing, and on all inputs, even those with nothing connected. When I play music the static is still there in the background.

I understand that such issues are often caused by 'ground' related electrical issues, but then it would be present in all modes.

Thank you again
 

Dolus

Active Member
Virtual mode only plays through the front left and right speakers to simulate surround sound. I have no idea why there is static when Virtual is selected. I just selected Virtual on my receiver, (for the first time ever. :)), and it sounded better than I imagined and no static.

Much better to use 'Dolby PL11 or' or Dolby Neo 6 which will up mix two channel material to all speakers, ideal for TV programs that are two channel.

Marantz NR1506 Sound Modes
 

MegaKen

Novice Member
Virtual mode only plays through the front left and right speakers to simulate surround sound. I have no idea why there is static when Virtual is selected. I just selected Virtual on my receiver, (for the first time ever. :)), and it sounded better than I imagined and no static.

Much better to use 'Dolby PL11 or' or Dolby Neo 6 which will up mix two channel material to all speakers, ideal for TV programs that are two channel.

Marantz NR1506 Sound Modes
Yes, exactly - it sounds great in terms of "musicality" etc, but I can't figure out the static. If I can remove the static it'll be just fantastic. And it's only in virtual, which is weirder than if it was in all modes..
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Why are you using the virtual option if you've actual surround speakers present. You'd not use the virtual mode unless you'd not surrounds.

All it does is attempt to create the impression that surrounds are present in a setup devoid of them. If you have surrounds present then use them and not the virtual mode.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
I do not have actual surrounds... I have 2 fronts and a sub
Then that makes the upmixing modes completely irrelevant. Absolutely no need to use them at all.
 

MegaKen

Novice Member
Then that makes the upmixing modes completely irrelevant. Absolutely no need to use them at all.
Wut
That is the point of the thing - I'm using it exactly for what it's intended for...
 

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MegaKen

Novice Member
Audyssey is a form of room EQ correction. The balancing and levelling of your speakers as well as the bass management is not something dealt with by Audyssey and is simply something done during the calibration. The resulting speaker levels and distance post calibration would still be in effect uf you turn Audyssey off. Audyssey deals with issues with the room's EQ and acoustics and not the speaker levels and distances.

The calibration levels your speakers so that they attain the same SPL as measured from your primary listening location. They are levelled relative to an indistry regnised reference level of 75db. THe pink noise test tone should measure an SPL of 75db if and when the master volume isset to 0db post calibration. if measured from where the mic was uintially placed during the calibration.

The levels set in the speaker levels settings represenyt gow much the receiver had to boost or limit the signal being output to thosespeakers in order to level them so that they'd all give the same SPL measurement while portating the test tone.

If you change those levels then it has no effect on the room EQ. It will jowever result in your setup being incorrectly levellled iunless you are making such adhustments relative to measurement you yourself are taking using an handheld SPL meter.


Why do you want to change the speaker levels?
Why do I want to change the speaker level? I think mostly because of OCD - it's set to an industry standard of 75db, which seems arbitrary to me. My life would be easier if the baseline was simply at 0 regardless of dB, then I would control the dB with volume knob. Or am I missing something? What is this magic 75db value?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
THe standardised reference level used to calibrate AV receivers has a reason behind it. The reference level is intended to emulate the same setup in your home theatre as that which was used to calibrate the setup when the soundtrack was mixed. It is also in alignment with how a cinema would have its setupo calibrated.if correctly


https://www.soundandvision.com/content/‘relative’-vs-‘absolute’-volume-what’s-difference


Alter the balance of the speakers relative to where you are seated and you alter what was heard and intend by whoever mixed it.
 

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