Help With Aerial Ports in New Build

connan93

Novice Member
Hi all, just after some help with aerial ports and coaxial cables in my new house. The previous owners used Sky/Virgin and therefore had no aerial, whereas we've decided to go with just Freeview at the moment. We got someone to come and fit an aerial - there are 3 ports in the house - 2 in the living room (opposite ends) and 1 in the master bedroom. The man who came and sorted it for me said the signal wasn't strong enough to be split so he connected up the port we specified in the living room and left the other 2 wires disconnected in the attic.

We've since moved the living room around, and I'm just wondering if it's possible for me to go into the attic and simply figure out which cable corresponds to the other aerial port in the living room and connect it up to the aerial. I've had a look online and can't find anything covering this scenario, and I would prefer to do it myself if I could, to save time, money and having someone unnecessarily in my house during COVID!

Thanks
 

mike7

Distinguished Member
You should just need an aerial amp/splitter in the loft and connect it to all the 3 leads to your rooms. If you have a mains socket in the attic it can be powered from that. Alternatively some can be powered remotely from a small unit at the TV end of one of the connections. All the sockets should then give a sufficiently good signal. A competent aerial fitter would have measured the strength of signal available and either fitted an amplifier on the aerial itself or in the loft. Hopefully the aerial is aligned to give you the best signal available and is suitable for your area. Rodders53 will be able to recommend what you need to buy.

Update: Suitable units are available from Screwfix (which is open) They need a mains power socket in the attic and you may have to change the connectors to screwable ones rather than the conventional TV aerial plugs. It's worth doing the job well....and safely, if you are making a mains connection.
 
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connan93

Novice Member
You should just need an aerial amp/splitter in the loft and connect it to all the 3 leads to your rooms. If you have a mains socket in the attic it can be powered from that. Alternatively some can be powered remotely from a small unit at the TV end of one of the connections. All the sockets should then give a sufficiently good signal. A competent aerial fitter would have measured the strength of signal available and either fitted an amplifier on the aerial itself or in the loft. Hopefully the aerial is aligned to give you the best signal available and is suitable for your area. Rodders53 will be able to recommend what you need to buy.

Update: Suitable units are available from Screwfix (which is open) They need a mains power socket in the attic and you may have to change the connectors to screwable ones rather than the conventional TV aerial plugs. It's worth doing the job well....and safely, if you are making a mains connection.
Thanks. I will definitely look into that, however my most pressing concern is just switching the port which receives the signal at the moment. I'm assuming this is fairly straightforward? Just find the correct cable and plug it into the aerial/connect to a cable coming out of the aerial? I'm pretty comfortable with prepping the cable if it needs trimming etc.
 
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mikej

Well-known Member
my most pressing concern is just switching the port which receives the signal at the moment. I'm assuming this is fairly straightforward? Just find the correct cable and plug it into the aerial/connect to a cable coming out of the aerial?
If the guy that did the work made a connection in the loft between the coax to the new aerial and the coax run to the lounge, then yes - it should be as straight forward as disconnecting the current connection and connecting the coax from the other lounge socket to the aerial instead.

I would use F-type plugs and an F-plug to F-plug connector for a more secure connection and these could then be used on a future distribution amp if you get one.

If the cables aren't long enough, then you'll need an additional length of coax to join them which hopefully won't be an issue, provided your current signal strengths are good enough.
 
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