Help setting up Denon AVR-X2700H

SnowJim

Member
Hi,

I have hade the following setup :

Yamaha RX-A3030
Monitor Audio RX8
Monitor Audio RSFX
Monitor Audio RX Center
Velodyne spl-1200
Nvidia Shield Pro
Nintendo Switch
LG OLED65C8

Now I have replaced the Yamaha with a Denon AVR-X2700H because of bunch of problems that is solved with the new AVR.

I have done the following so far to setup Denon AVR :

  • Follow onscreen guide
  • Audyssey MultEQ XT with measurements from 3 different places (around 50-70 cm from backwall and 60-70 from each other where 1 right Infront). I have another other off places to but no measurements was done for this (it’s about 2 m from center). The subwoofer was set on volume 30/100 and are not increased to 45.
  • Change all speakers to Large
  • Increase -4 db to -2 db on center to get clearer speech
  • Change the Crossover from measured 110 Hz to 80 Hz
  • Turn off Audyssey Dynamic EQ
  • While playing movies Dolby Digital Plus or Direct is used.
  • While playing music regular stereo is used. To get the subwoofer on the train the mode is set to LFE+Main.

The Subwoofer are calibrated and setup from before.

So am I on the right track? Is there something more I should setup?

I have notice that the night mode is hidden away even further away than on the Yamaha, with Denon its Setup > Audio > Audyssey > Dynamic Range, with the Yamaha it was just mini menu > Dynamic Volume. Is there a faster way on the Denon?
 

gibbsy

Moderator
All speakers should be set to small and with a crossover of 80hz. Use LFE only with the sub which should have it's own crossover set to it's maximum. For stereo music leave it on stereo so that the sub is employed. You may get a better stereo performance by employing Direct which by-passes the sub. That's up to you to decide.

I don't think this Denon will get anywhere near the audio performance of the Yamaha as the nearest tier performer to the Yamaha would be the Denon X6700.
 

DavidT

Well-known Member
Speakers should be set to small if you have a sub. Why change the crossover from 110 to 80, if Audyssey measured it at 110 then it should be left there although I'm surprised your speakers were measured at 110 for the crossover.

Can you show us the Denons setup screens for the speakers.
 

SnowJim

Member
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Last edited:

gibbsy

Moderator
All look fine except for the last screen. Use LFE only, using +Main can lead to boomy bass. Also LPF for LFE should be set to 120hz which is the default setting. On speaker crossover bring them up to 80hz.
 

josefK666

Active Member
  • Audyssey MultEQ XT with measurements from 3 different places (around 50-70 cm from backwall and 60-70 from each other where 1 right Infront). I have another other off places to but no measurements was done for this (it’s about 2 m from center). The subwoofer was set on volume 30/100 and are not increased to 45.
  • Change all speakers to Large
  • Increase -4 db to -2 db on center to get clearer speech
  • Change the Crossover from measured 110 Hz to 80 Hz
  • Turn off Audyssey Dynamic EQ
  • While playing movies Dolby Digital Plus or Direct is used.
  • While playing music regular stereo is used. To get the subwoofer on the train the mode is set to LFE+Main.
I'd suggest the following:-
  • I believe XT allows eight measurements. It's a pain but I'd suggest you do eight as this will give you the most accurate results - keep the measurement positions in a fairly close grouping (within about 20 inches or so of each other round the MLP).
  • Change all speakers to Small - this allows you to control effective Bass Management. Having them set to Large means that they will play full band. Let your subwoofer do the heavy lifting with the low frequencies. It'll sound better and your speakers and AVR will thank you for it.
  • Crossover - your screenshot shows 40hz. If this is the number you see after running Audyssey then it is not a crossover as such - it's Audyssey telling your AVR at what point your speakers are rolling off (averaged and rounded). Often this may be lower than speaker specs because of the effects of the room and speaker placement. Raising them is fine - 80hz is a good start. Don't lower them as then Audyssey EQ filters won't be applied to those lower frequencies. You also mention them at a setting of 110hz - if that's what Audyssey has returned then I suggest you run it again (eight measurements will be more accurate) as this suggests something wrong with your speaker set-up or with the way Audyssey was run.
  • Turning off DEQ is fine though you don't say why. It's worth experimenting with if you routinely watch content below Reference volume. You mention about wanting clearer speech - many people have found that also switching Dynamic Volume on and putting it onto 'Light' does a good job of that. Give it a go. If it's not to your liking switch both off.
  • You mention sound modes for movies (Dolby Digital Plus or Direct). Direct and Pure Direct modes disable Audyssey processing and are most commonly used for music as they try to provide as 'pure' a sound quality as possible for stereo listening. I would choose the Auto mode (you have a choice of Direct/Pure Direct and Auto). Auto detects the input signal and switches the playback mode to match it as best it can. Pressing the 'Movie' mode button again brings up another menu of playback choices you can choose from if you wish (as does Music for music modes). Whatever you choose will be remembered next time for that input.
  • LFE + Main - avoid this as you risk 'doubling up' your bass - stick to LFE as others have said.
You might want to think about getting the Audyssey app (about £20) that lets you see the Frequency Responses (averaged) for each speaker and allows basic customisation. Just double-check you have a compatible android/apple device. It has low ratings because of that issue I think but I have it and although it's a little clunky it runs fine and is useful.

I hope this is constructive for you - not trying to tear you down.

I found the following link useful - lots of tips and advice on Audyssey and Bass Management:-


It's quite lengthy but you can dip in and out easily enough to find what you need. Helped me anyway :)

Best of luck.
 
Last edited:

Darbo

Active Member
I'd suggest the following:-
  • I believe XT allows eight measurements. It's a pain but I'd suggest you do eight as this will give you the most accurate results - keep the measurement positions in a fairly close grouping (within about 20 inches or so of each other round the MLP).
  • Change all speakers to Small - this allows you to control effective Bass Management. Having them set to Large means that they will play full band. Let your subwoofer do the heavy lifting with the low frequencies. It'll sound better and your speakers and AVR will thank you for it.
  • Crossover - your screenshot shows 40hz. If this is the number you see after running Audyssey then it is not a crossover as such - it's Audyssey telling your AVR at what point your speakers are rolling off (averaged and rounded). Often this may be lower than speaker specs because of the effects of the room and speaker placement. Raising them is fine - 80hz is a good start. Don't lower them as then Audyssey EQ filters won't be applied to those lower frequencies. You also mention them at a setting of 110hz - if that's what Audyssey has returned then I suggest you run it again (eight measurements will be more accurate) as this suggests something wrong with your speaker set-up or with the way Audyssey was run.
  • Turning off DEQ is fine though you don't say why. It's worth experimenting with if you routinely watch content below Reference volume. You mention about wanting clearer speech - many people have found that also switching Dynamic Volume on and putting it onto 'Light' does a good job of that. Give it a go. If it's not to your liking switch both off.
  • You mention sound modes for movies (Dolby Digital Plus or Direct). Direct and Pure Direct modes disable Audyssey processing and are most commonly used for music as they try to provide as 'pure' a sound quality as possible for stereo listening. I would choose the Auto mode (you have a choice of Direct/Pure Direct and Auto). Auto detects the input signal and switches the playback mode to match it as best it can. Pressing the 'Movie' mode button again brings up another menu of playback choices you can choose from if you wish (as does Music for music modes). Whatever you choose will be remembered next time for that input.
  • LFE + Main - avoid this as you risk 'doubling up' your bass - stick to LFE as others have said.
You might want to think about getting the Audyssey app (about £20) that lets you see the Frequency Responses (averaged) for each speaker and allows basic customisation. Just double-check you have a compatible android/apple device. It has low ratings because of that issue I think but I have it and although it's a little clunky it runs fine and is useful.

I hope this is constructive for you - not trying to tear you down.

I found the following link useful - lots of tips and advice on Audyssey and Bass Management:-


It's quite lengthy but you can dip in and out easily enough to find what you need. Helped me anyway :)

Best of luck.
Can you double check that link mate? It's not working but i wouldn't mind a look at the thread you mentioned.
 

josefK666

Active Member
Apologies - I think I managed to crop the end off!


It's long but there is an index with links to help you get around it. Hope you find it useful.
 

Dolus

Active Member
@josefk666 Looks like we were posting at the same time. :D
 
D

Deleted member 901590

Guest
General rule is to never lower the crossover values Audyssey sets. You can raise but not lower. With the app, you can see what's happening in the bass region, how much correction it can make and hence make better judgement on crossovers.
110Hz, for your RSFX speakers, doesn't sound too unrealistic. They're not very deep and the quoted figures don't give proper specs.
It shows your sub level at 0dB, I wouldn't be happy with that, it should be in the minus (but not too much minus) so I would raise the sub's volume control slightly.
When you say a distance from back wall, we don't know where your chair/sofa is or the position relative to the seat back. Out of interest, my best Audysseys have been with the tripod right at the front of the sofa or even some I've done with the tripod on the ground right at the front of the cushion but at MLP height.

Anyway, as said above, I would very strongly recommend using the app. You can then, if you want, share all your results curves, levels and crossovers on here for tips.
 

SnowJim

Member
All speakers should be set to small and with a crossover of 80hz. Use LFE only with the sub which should have it's own crossover set to it's maximum. For stereo music leave it on stereo so that the sub is employed. You may get a better stereo performance by employing Direct which by-passes the sub. That's up to you to decide.

Thanks!

I don't think this Denon will get anywhere near the audio performance of the Yamaha as the nearest tier performer to the Yamaha would be the Denon X6700.

Why do you say that? According to a friend(audiophile) all amplifiers above 10 EUR offer about the same sound quality today. That means the distortion and so on added between input and output in direct mode are about the same at a manageable volume (for the hardware). The reason why some amplifiers are more expensive than others (according to him) is due to:


  • More features
  • More In/out ports
  • Higher quality components (like conductors) that do not get a better result but last longer and handles more stress
  • Higher effect that demands higher precision in reducing distortion and so on between input and output.
  • Marketing

I am myself obviously not an audiophile but I get that Output from an amplifier should be as close as possible to the input no matter the amplification but in the big picture with speakers and room setup I do not really understand what good sound quality really is (more then my own likings) and if it’s really measurable (who decides where the baseline is?).

I have been thinking about switching out the Yamaha for about 2 years, last year I bought a Sony STR-DN1080. To my surprise I heard almost no difference in "sound" between the Yamaha and the Sony. Sony possible produced a bit more push that is probably a bit of their signature sound profile even with direct mode. This AVR hade however problems and it felt very cheap (maybe because it was) so we did a refund.

The Denon we got now for about the double price of the Sony offers a lot higher quality, all I had to do was run the setup guide and then everything just worked. Me and my gf do perceive the sound a bit dull compared to the Yamaha, it’s less punchy but I'm not sure this is a bad thing. The quality(detail) are about the same. We are used to the Yamaha signature; the Sony might have been exaggerating the pushiness while Denon's signature is a bit withdrawn on this front. However, the Denon use the surround speakers a lot better, we almost never heard them with the Yamaha, with Denon we notice them a lot more.

I also have a Yamaha RX-A1020 and honestly, we do not notice any difference between this and the RX-A3030. The only reason that we have the RX-A3030 in our main room is due to it got more head room for higher volume, but we rarely use it.

If there in fact are a sound quality difference, then I'm probably to inexperience to notice it. As I said, I do notice some differences but to me it appears to be a signature difference and not really a quality difference.
 
Last edited:

SnowJim

Member
All look fine except for the last screen. Use LFE only, using +Main can lead to boomy bass. Also LPF for LFE should be set to 120hz which is the default setting. On speaker crossover bring them up to 80hz.

I'd suggest the following:-
  • I believe XT allows eight measurements. It's a pain but I'd suggest you do eight as this will give you the most accurate results - keep the measurement positions in a fairly close grouping (within about 20 inches or so of each other round the MLP).
  • Change all speakers to Small - this allows you to control effective Bass Management. Having them set to Large means that they will play full band. Let your subwoofer do the heavy lifting with the low frequencies. It'll sound better and your speakers and AVR will thank you for it.
  • Crossover - your screenshot shows 40hz. If this is the number you see after running Audyssey then it is not a crossover as such - it's Audyssey telling your AVR at what point your speakers are rolling off (averaged and rounded). Often this may be lower than speaker specs because of the effects of the room and speaker placement. Raising them is fine - 80hz is a good start. Don't lower them as then Audyssey EQ filters won't be applied to those lower frequencies. You also mention them at a setting of 110hz - if that's what Audyssey has returned then I suggest you run it again (eight measurements will be more accurate) as this suggests something wrong with your speaker set-up or with the way Audyssey was run.
  • Turning off DEQ is fine though you don't say why. It's worth experimenting with if you routinely watch content below Reference volume. You mention about wanting clearer speech - many people have found that also switching Dynamic Volume on and putting it onto 'Light' does a good job of that. Give it a go. If it's not to your liking switch both off.
  • You mention sound modes for movies (Dolby Digital Plus or Direct). Direct and Pure Direct modes disable Audyssey processing and are most commonly used for music as they try to provide as 'pure' a sound quality as possible for stereo listening. I would choose the Auto mode (you have a choice of Direct/Pure Direct and Auto). Auto detects the input signal and switches the playback mode to match it as best it can. Pressing the 'Movie' mode button again brings up another menu of playback choices you can choose from if you wish (as does Music for music modes). Whatever you choose will be remembered next time for that input.
  • LFE + Main - avoid this as you risk 'doubling up' your bass - stick to LFE as others have said.
You might want to think about getting the Audyssey app (about £20) that lets you see the Frequency Responses (averaged) for each speaker and allows basic customisation. Just double-check you have a compatible android/apple device. It has low ratings because of that issue I think but I have it and although it's a little clunky it runs fine and is useful.

I hope this is constructive for you - not trying to tear you down.

I found the following link useful - lots of tips and advice on Audyssey and Bass Management:-


It's quite lengthy but you can dip in and out easily enough to find what you need. Helped me anyway :)

Best of luck.

Thanks, I will try this out!


I set the LFE + Main to get the subwoofer going in music mode so how do I get this working? Is there a way to easily switch between movie and music mode without adding a lot of Denon EQ?

I tried turning on the Audyssey dynamic volume at night, but the sound got strange? Not like on the Yamaha at all.
 

SnowJim

Member
General rule is to never lower the crossover values Audyssey sets. You can raise but not lower. With the app, you can see what's happening in the bass region, how much correction it can make and hence make better judgement on crossovers.
110Hz, for your RSFX speakers, doesn't sound too unrealistic. They're not very deep and the quoted figures don't give proper specs.
It shows your sub level at 0dB, I wouldn't be happy with that, it should be in the minus (but not too much minus) so I would raise the sub's volume control slightly.
When you say a distance from back wall, we don't know where your chair/sofa is or the position relative to the seat back. Out of interest, my best Audysseys have been with the tripod right at the front of the sofa or even some I've done with the tripod on the ground right at the front of the cushion but at MLP height.

Anyway, as said above, I would very strongly recommend using the app. You can then, if you want, share all your results curves, levels and crossovers on here for tips.

Why is it bad that the sub level sits at 0dB?
 
D

Deleted member 901590

Guest
Thanks!



Why do you say that? According to a friend(audiophile) all amplifiers above 10 EUR offer about the same sound quality today. That means the distortion and so on added between input and output in direct mode are about the same at a manageable volume (for the hardware). The reason why some amplifiers are more expensive than others (according to him) is due to:


  • More features
  • More In/out ports
  • Higher quality components (like conductors) that do not get a better result but last longer and handles more stress
  • Higher effect that demands higher precision in reducing distortion and so on between input and output.
  • Marketing

I am myself obviously not an audiophile but I get that Output from an amplifier should be as close as possible to the input no matter the amplification but in the big picture with speakers and room setup I do not really understand what good sound quality really is (more then my own linings) and if it’s really measurable (who decides where the baseline is?).

I have been thinking about switching out the Yamaha for about 2 years, last year I bought a Sony STR-DN1080. To my surprise I head almost no difference in "sound" between the Yamaha and the Sony. Sony possible produced a bit more push that is probably a bit of their signature sound profile even with direct mode. This AVR hade however problems and it felt very cheap (maybe because it was) so we did a refund.

The Denon we got now for about the double price of the Sony offers a lot higher quality, all I had to do was run the setup guide and then everything just worked. Me and my gf do perceive the sound a bit dull compared to the Yamaha, it’s less punchy but I'm not sure this is a bad thing. We are used to the Yamaha signature; the Sony might have been exaggerating the pushiness while Denon's signature is a bit withdrawn on this front. However, the Denon use the surround speakers a lot better, we almost never heard them with the Yamaha, with Denon we notice them a lot more.

I also have a Yamaha RX-A1020 and honestly, we do not notice any difference between this and the RX-A3030. The only reason that we have the RX-A3030 in our main room is due to it got more head room for higher volume, but we rarely use it.

If there in fact are a sound quality difference, then I'm probably to inexperience to notice it. As I said, I do notice some differences but to me it appears to be a signature difference and not really a quality difference.

Thanks @SnowJim I shared your post here (as it's relevant):

 

SnowJim

Member
You talk about doing a full Audyssey not only with 3 but all of the measurement locations. Why do we need to do multiple measurements? With the Yamaha you do only one? Also why is it suggested that the measurements locations should be in different places? There can only be 1 sweet spot right?
 
D

Deleted member 901590

Guest
You talk about doing a full Audyssey not only with 3 but all of the measurement locations. Why do we need to do multiple measurements? With the Yamaha you do only one? Also why is it suggested that the measurements locations should be in different places? There can only be 1 sweet spot right?

The MLP is the first measurement position, so that the levels and timing are optimised for that position. The frequency response and "sound reflections", i.e. time domain response per channel are measured there too and then in the other positions.

Subtle changes in the microphone position that are then averaged/computed tell the EQ system about the overall response of each channel.

I assume you're aware that there are 3 ways of running Audyssey now? You can do it on your AVR, or use the phone/tablet app or now use a PC/laptop and run MultEQ-X. The 3rd system (the most expensive) offers the most visibility of what's going on. For example, a key difference is it shows the results at each mic location, you can choose for it to include or delete each position and you can change MLP if you want.

The easiest way to see to explain the benefits of the multiple positions is if you look up the MultEQ-X thread on AVSforum. There are many, many people who've shared results. You will get a picture of the differences people see at the different MIC locations and an understanding of why it's beneficial.

Another way is, for example for the subwoofer, if you play with the free download "REW room sim" software. Just raising or lowering your MLP by a few cm you will see can massively change the frequency response of the subwoofer. Yes, it is a simulation but its showing what really happens.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
You talk about doing a full Audyssey not only with 3 but all of the measurement locations. Why do we need to do multiple measurements? With the Yamaha you do only one? Also why is it suggested that the measurements locations should be in different places? There can only be 1 sweet spot right?
Audyssey is a better room correction software than that found on Yamaha. The X2700 has the mid tier Audyssey, the higher version of XT32 being found on models above the X2700. The multiple calibration points are used so that the software better understands how the room effects the audio and makes the necessary adjustments. YAPO was always considered to be somewhat inferior to Audyssey.

According to a friend(audiophile) all amplifiers above 10 EUR offer about the same sound quality today.
I'm afraid I'll have to disagree with your 'audiophile' friend. Either that or my journey through various tiers of AV amps has been a complete waste of my time and money.
 

SnowJim

Member
The MLP is the first measurement position, so that the levels and timing are optimised for that position. The frequency response and "sound reflections", i.e. time domain response per channel are measured there too and then in the other positions.

Subtle changes in the microphone position that are then averaged/computed tell the EQ system about the overall response of each channel.

I assume you're aware that there are 3 ways of running Audyssey now? You can do it on your AVR, or use the phone/tablet app or now use a PC/laptop and run MultEQ-X. The 3rd system (the most expensive) offers the most visibility of what's going on. For example, a key difference is it shows the results at each mic location, you can choose for it to include or delete each position and you can change MLP if you want.

The easiest way to see to explain the benefits of the multiple positions is if you look up the MultEQ-X thread on AVSforum. There are many, many people who've shared results. You will get a picture of the differences people see at the different MIC locations and an understanding of why it's beneficial.

Another way is, for example for the subwoofer, if you play with the free download "REW room sim" software. Just raising or lowering your MLP by a few cm you will see can massively change the frequency response of the subwoofer. Yes, it is a simulation but its showing what really happens.

So, what do you really suggest me doing? Running the Audyssey from the AVR and use all the measurement locations that are offered. The location does not have to be real sittings but they need to be within 60 cm from the original sweet spot?
 

SnowJim

Member
Audyssey is a better room correction software than that found on Yamaha. The X2700 has the mid tier Audyssey, the higher version of XT32 being found on models above the X2700. The multiple calibration points are used so that the software better understands how the room effects the audio and makes the necessary adjustments. YAPO was always considered to be somewhat inferior to Audyssey.

Yes I read about that, I did look at the model above X2700 but I did not feel that it really offered as much as the extra cost in my setup. No doubt that XT32 is better but Im not so sure I would have heard the difference anyway.

I'm afraid I'll have to disagree with your 'audiophile' friend. Either that or my journey through various tiers of AV amps has been a complete waste of my time and money.

Hehe Yes, you and I have hade that discussing before ;) And between us I suspect that there is an experience and knowledge gap that might be the reason why I do not notice a big difference between these units.

Maybe it’s like the difference between LED and OLED when you notice that the color gets washed out just by taking a step to left\right on a LED you can never unseen it. This while people that haven't found it or read about it do also not have a problem with it.

In a way It might be good for my wallet and wellbeing that I do not have enough knowledge or experience to notice a groundbreaking difference :)
 

josefK666

Active Member
Thanks, I will try this out!


I set the LFE + Main to get the subwoofer going in music mode so how do I get this working? Is there a way to easily switch between movie and music mode without adding a lot of Denon EQ?

I tried turning on the Audyssey dynamic volume at night, but the sound got strange? Not like on the Yamaha at all.
The problem with LFE+Main is that it will cause your Main Speakers and Subwoofer to duplicate some of the bass signal. You might like that effect but it's generally not advised.
Having your speakers set to Small and with just LFE will divert the bass below your crossover point to the subwoofer when in MUSIC-STEREO Mode so should get you close to where you want to be.
Direct/Pure Direct disables processing but limits your use of the subwoofer.
Unfortunately your model of AVR, like my X3700, doesn't have some of the more flexible 2ch controls of the top tier models so your options are a bit limited. Nor, I think, does it have Quick Select buttons which make this all a little easier.
Try selecting 'Stereo' as your default MUSIC mode, and whatever mode you prefer as the default for the MOVIE button and see how you get along.

Fair enough if you don't like Dynamic Volume (I'm using it at the moment while I wait for my new Centre Channel). I don't go above 'Light' - it has an obvious artificial effect but does the job I need without being too intrusive. If you do want to experiment with DEQ there are ways of adjusting its effect by reducing the Reference Level Offset......

1649241714277.png
 
D

Deleted member 901590

Guest
So, what do you really suggest me doing? Running the Audyssey from the AVR and use all the measurement locations that are offered. The location does not have to be real sittings but they need to be within 60 cm from the original sweet spot?

Assuming you don't want to blow the cash on MultEQ-X, then I'd go for the phone/tablet app.

There are multiple online guides of the best way to run Audyssey, e.g. mic positions. And quite a lot of it becomes people's personal preferences too! (Like many other things).

I choose MLP as a point half way in-between mine and my wife's seat positions but forward to the edge of the sofa at our ear height. This is an almost exact symmetrical distance from all speakers and the subs. Then, one 0.5m right, 0.5m left, then three in front (literally only about 0.2m forward but in an offset position to the previous three.

I've never done more than six :) but I get told off for that on AVF.

Then, as you've seen my recent findings here have made EQ not quite as important for me haha:

 

SnowJim

Member
The app hade vary bad grade on Android Play store so I went ahead and did a new calibration from the AVR menu with 8 locations, this time with the sub on volume 50 instead of 30. This is what I got:

Speakers : Front and Center Large, back small
Distance : Front L : 3.42, Front R : 2.97, Center : 3.06, Sur L : 2.76, Sur R : 2.76
Level : Front L : -3, Front R : -3, Center : -3.5, Sur L : + 2, Sur R +0.5, Sub -10.5
Crossover : FullBand all 40 hz
LPF for LFE : 80 Hz
Audyssey : Reference

I changed the following :

Crossover : all 80 Hz
Subwoofer Mode : LFE

After trying movie and music I found the sound to be vary canned and strange, so I turned off the Audyssey Dynamic EQ and Dynamic Volume and that helped a lot. I still found the sound to be way to sharp and it feels like it was missing its body, something in the middle. So, I changed the crossover back to 40 Hz I also changed the Level of Sub from -10.5 to -2. This gave a much richer sound, but I feel that there is still something missing, maybe I'm just use to a fuller sound on the Yamaha.

I notice that even with the LFE + Main off the stereo mode with music button(remote) did infract include the sub any way, that's nice.

I will take my time and read your posts and see what can by tried to make it better.
 
Last edited:
D

Deleted member 901590

Guest
I will take my time and read your posts and see what can by tried to make it batter.
Just eggs, flour, milk and a small pinch of salt :)

I also changed the Level of Sub from -10.5 to -2
Wow, so you like it bass heavy?

LPF for LFE : 80 Hz
Normal setting for this is 120Hz, some like it at 80 though. I have mine at 90 at the moment (for experiment).

I changed the crossover back to 40 Hz
When you have the app, you can see the bass response of each channel and choose the crossover appropriately. I would say that with it set at 40Hz in all your speakers, you are losing quite a lot of the sound (as the speakers won't be able to properly reproduce a lot of that low frequency) and as such that may be why you've turned up the sub level so much to try and compensate!

The app hade vary bad grade on Android Play store
No idea why. If you've checked your phone/tablet in the compatibility then it should be fine. I've had it for about 4 or 5 years, used it on about 4 different AVRs and had no problems.
The other bonus of the app is that you can switch off what it calls "midrange compensation" - for me this made an even bigger difference with music than with HC and TV. (Note, I used to have AVRs that were app compatible).

this time with the sub on volume 50 instead of 30
Looks like 40 would be the sweet spot. If you choose to get the app and do it again, I'd set the sub at 40.

Audyssey : Reference
Also consider the FLAT setting. I find this works particularly better for music but also mostly use it for HC and TV now as well.
 

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Sony unveils Inzone gaming brand
  • By Ian Collen
  • Published

Full fat HDMI teeshirts

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