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Help! Scart ,RGB ,Component ?

Discussion in 'Cables & Switches' started by WhiteTigerK, Jan 16, 2004.

  1. WhiteTigerK

    WhiteTigerK
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    Hi there,

    I have a big problem. I'm quite new in the home cinema thing, and I want to know some things. first, I know that there is a thing called Component Video. I know it has 3 socket (Red, Green, Blue) but at this point I lost myself - I've heard that there are 2 types of Component Video -

    1) Component RGB
    2) Component YUV

    Now, I red that those 2 Component types is total different from each other and i wanted to know why is that and what is the different ?

    I bought a Toshiba 29VH27F TV and it has 3 Scarts in the back :

    1) Regular Scart
    2) Scart with AV / S-VHS Support
    3) Scart with AV / RGB Support

    Now, if I have a DVD Player and I want to connect it to the TV, i should connect it with a SCART TO SCART cable that can deliver RGB signals ? or I can use COMPONENT TO SCART cable and then connect it from the COMPONENT Output in my DVD Player to the Scart AV / RGB Support Input in my TV ???

    Anoter thing - if I'll buy an audio/video receiver that has S-Video output and i will connect a DVD Player to the reveiver to the TV like that :

    1) Component Cable FROM the DVD Player TO the receiver
    2) S-Video & 2 RCA (For Audio) FROM the receiver TO the TV

    will I be losing lot of picture quality due the Component use in the DVD TO RECEIVER connect and S-VIDEO use in the RECEIVER TO TV connect ???

    thank you very much and I'm sorry if my English is not that good...
     
  2. Ian J

    Ian J
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    The Toshiba television will not accept a component input so you should connect the dvd player to the television using a scart cable to the socket on the television that takes RGB

    If you buy an AV receiver you should keep the scart cable as it is at the moment but connect the DVD player to the AV receiver by either a co-axial or optical digital cable for the sound only.

    RGB is a similar quality to component and there is no point in routing the picture signals through the AV receiver as it will only degrade the quality
     
  3. WhiteTigerK

    WhiteTigerK
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    First of all thank you for answering my question.
    After I red what you wrote I still don't know what is the different between a Component RGB and Component YUV ? I red the article at :

    http://www.hificables.co.uk/yuv_rgb.htm

    and I didn't understend a thing. can you explain it to me ?
    You are saying that RGB and Component are different things, and in this article it says that there is a Component RGB thing.... so..


    Secondly, are you sure that RGB is equal to Component (Picture Quality I mean) because from what I red I think you are wrong - but I will be happy if you'll correct me and prove that they are equal....

    10x again.
     
  4. Joe Fernand

    Joe Fernand
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    WhiteTigerK

    Component video covers a whole host of Video signal standards that split the video signal down into various 'Component's of Colour, Luminance and SYNC information.

    Composite video carries all of this info on one cable whilst the common Component video signals such as:
    S-Video transmits it on TWO cables
    YUV transmits it on THREE cables
    RGB transmits it on anything from THREE to FIVE cables depending on what type of RGB signal you are sending.

    A well executed RGB signal is very similar to a well executed YUV signal - though there are pluses and minuses of both systems and different models that have both may produce better results on one output/input over the other.

    Most TV's and DVD players aimed at the European market will use SCART input and output sockets and as SCART allows for either Composite, S-Video or RGB (or any combination of the three depending on make and model) its normal that RGB is the best available video signal between your DVD and your TV.

    TV's, Plasma Displays, Projectors and DVD players aimed at both the European and the US markets will normally also include YUV inputs and outputs as this is the favoured signal type over RGB in the US market.

    As your TV has SCART RGB inputs you will use the SCART RGB output from your DVD player and ignore the three RCA YUV output sockets on your DVD player; YUV and RGB are non compatible and if you only had YUV out on your DVD and RGB in on your TV you would require a transcoder between the DVD and the TV to convert the YUV to RGB; as these transcoders are aimed at the Pro Market and cost anything from £1K and upwards you dont often see anyone doing this in a Consumer system :)

    If your AV Receiver only has S-Video inputs and outputs then you will need to ensure all of your source kit has S-Video outputs - or add in an RGB2S-Video converter to any of your sources that dont have S-Video but do have RGB via SCART, the RGB2S-Video converters we use (from JS Technology) are aimed at the consumer market and do a great job for around £75.00.

    There are numerous sites with lots and lots of info on why you have RGB and YUV - do a quick search using the Google search engine and you'll probably take about a week to read the many pages of text covering the intricacies of both systems.

    Best regards

    Joe

    PS One of the best tech glossaries is provided by Kramer electronics - see http://www.kramerelectronics.com/glossary/glossary1.asp
     

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