Help re coax cable

sarahdunne00

Novice Member
Hi! I was wondering if anyone can help me. I’ve just moved to the depths of the highlands and the house has 2 coax cables - no wall plate, just loose cables. My landlord has no clue about what the cables connect to, but seems to think the previous tenant watched Freeview. I went to connect one of the loose leads to my new tv, to watch the built in Freeview and it doesn’t fit what so ever. Tell me, do I just need a male to female lead, or something a bit more technical? Thanks in advance 🙏🏼
 

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ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
It looks like a pair of satellite cables with what is called an f type male connector on the end, they will run to a satellite dish at the other end.

These need to go into either a satellite setup box either Sky or a generic aftermarket one, sometimes referred to as Freesat.

Alternatively some TVs, particularly higher end models have a satellite tuner built in. These typically have one female f connector socket on that will take one of the cables without any adapters.

You may find that Freeview via an aerial is not possible to pick up at your location (due to hills etc) , whereas so long as you have line of sight of the satellite this will work.

The easiest way if you don’t want to subscribe to sky is to buy a freesat box. One other thing to watch is if the previous tenant upgraded to sky q then they change what’s known as the LNB on the dish for a different one that supports wideband and the new setup box would need to support that.
 

sarahdunne00

Novice Member
Thanks
It looks like a pair of satellite cables with what is called an f type male connector on the end, they will run to a satellite dish at the other end.

These need to go into either a satellite setup box either Sky or a generic aftermarket one, sometimes referred to as Freesat.

Alternatively some TVs, particularly higher end models have a satellite tuner built in. These typically have one female f connector socket on that will take one of the cables without any adapters.

You may find that Freeview via an aerial is not possible to pick up at your location (due to hills etc) , whereas so long as you have line of sight of the satellite this will work.

The easiest way if you don’t want to subscribe to sky is to buy a freesat box. One other thing to watch is if the previous tenant upgraded to sky q then they change what’s known as the LNB on the dish for a different one that supports wideband and the new setup box would need to support that.

Thanks for your reply. It’s probably worth mentioning I bought a brand new tv yesterday (Sharp 40bl2ka) with freeview built in. What’s the easiest way I can watch live tv.. is it worth buying a plug in aerial, seeing if I can get any channels? Thanks in advance.
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
It depends on where you live, you can check your postcode on Freeview here


And I seem to think there was one that told you what type of aerial you might need. If you are living in day a valley it might be impossible to get a decent signal.

Having said that I just googled your model number and according to the one you have given it does have a satellite tuner built in. From the manual it appears to be the at the side the bottom connector, below hdmi 3 and the aerial input.

For whatever reason they have used a more conventional TV connector though so in this case you will need an adapter female f type to belling Lee (normal tv) male. Something like the top one of these Amazon product

Probably able to pick one up locally too.

Then you should just be able to hook up one of the cables and then run through the tv setup again making sure you select the use satellite option when prompted (also connecting to internet can preload the channel information so it’s quicker)
 

KBD

Well-known Member
Those connectors in the OP are exactly what I have for my OTA antenna here in the U.S..
I went to a local tool store & bought the compression fittings & the crimper to put them on myself, so that I could make the coax to the length I desired.

It appears you folks use the same type of connectors I used in Thailand, no threads.
 

sarahdunne00

Novice Member
It looks like a pair of satellite cables with what is called an f type male connector on the end, they will run to a satellite dish at the other end.

These need to go into either a satellite setup box either Sky or a generic aftermarket one, sometimes referred to as Freesat.

Alternatively some TVs, particularly higher end models have a satellite tuner built in. These typically have one female f connector socket on that will take one of the cables without any adapters.

You may find that Freeview via an aerial is not possible to pick up at your location (due to hills etc) , whereas so long as you have line of sight of the satellite this will work.

The easiest way if you don’t want to subscribe to sky is to buy a freesat box. One other thing to watch is if the previous tenant upgraded to sky q then they change what’s known as the LNB on the dish for a different one that supports wideband and the new setup box would need to support that.
It depends on where you live, you can check your postcode on Freeview here


And I seem to think there was one that told you what type of aerial you might need. If you are living in day a valley it might be impossible to get a decent signal.

Having said that I just googled your model number and according to the one you have given it does have a satellite tuner built in. From the manual it appears to be the at the side the bottom connector, below hdmi 3 and the aerial input.

For whatever reason they have used a more conventional TV connector though so in this case you will need an adapter female f type to belling Lee (normal tv) male. Something like the top one of these Amazon product

Probably able to pick one up locally too.

Then you should just be able to hook up one of the cables and then run through the tv setup again making sure you select the use satellite option when prompted (also connecting to internet can preload the channel information so it’s quicker)

Thanks for this. I have used the freeview site and it says I should pick it up from the local mast no issues. That’s really helpful as I thought I needed to run it through the tv aerial input not satellite, so I’ll try and fix that today! Thank you so much 😀
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
Thanks for this. I have used the freeview site and it says I should pick it up from the local mast no issues. That’s really helpful as I thought I needed to run it through the tv aerial input not satellite, so I’ll try and fix that today! Thank you so much 😀

Just to be clear though, no point buying an aerial though with those cables already in place. They can’t be used for Freeview if attached to a satellite dish. Just that little adapter should work with TV, a local diy or electrical shop should have them.
 

sarahdunne00

Novice Member
Just to be clear though, no point buying an aerial though with those cables already in place. They can’t be used for Freeview if attached to a satellite dish. Just that little adapter should work with TV, a local diy or electrical shop should have them.
That’s grand. So if I bought one of those adapters, I attach one to the loose lead and the other end to the tv? Sorry to be so useless!
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
That’s grand. So if I bought one of those adapters, I attach one to the loose lead and the other end to the tv? Sorry to be so useless!

Yes that’s right. Just check on the back of your TV there should be two inputs below one labelled HDMI 3. Top one should be labelled tv in and bottom one should be satellite in. Just check first before you buy the adapter.

Than you just need to retune tv.
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
It appears you folks use the same type of connectors I used in Thailand, no threads.

Yep normally we use f type (screw) connectors in the U.K. for satellite and cable providers but recently a few companies have been using the more “traditional” TV over aerial connectors instead…
 

JayCee

Distinguished Member
OP, have you had a look around the building to see if there's a satellite dish?
 

sarahdunne00

Novice Member
Yes that’s right. Just check on the back of your TV there should be two inputs below one labelled HDMI 3. Top one should be labelled tv in and bottom one should be satellite in. Just check first before you buy the adapter.

Than you just need to retune tv.
Fantastic. I’m heading over to the house in the next hour I’ll send a photo! 🙂
 

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