Help please!

elthomp0777

Standard Member
Hi all!

I now have had 2 TV’s in last 10months, a KE-55XH8096 which had a faulty back panel (didn’t think it was a bad tv, other than Sony saying it was fine when there was a clear fault) and then a Samsung Q60 (When I think the picture quality is somewhat worse).

I want a decent TV that can handle dark scenes when watching tv and films, so there’s no light bleeding, or pixelated black areas.

Under £1000 if anyone has any recommendations.

The picture is from the Samsung, never seen anything like it with darkened areas.

Only had the Samsung since Thursday, going back to the store tomorrow.
 

Attachments

  • 3F8D7AA0-33B0-4A09-8EE2-63DA76F7D122.jpeg
    3F8D7AA0-33B0-4A09-8EE2-63DA76F7D122.jpeg
    236.9 KB · Views: 26

mikej

Well-known Member
I want a decent TV that can handle dark scenes when watching tv and films, so there’s no light bleeding, or pixelated black areas.
What you want is an OLED.
 

Kapkirk

Active Member
Hi all!

I now have had 2 TV’s in last 10months, a KE-55XH8096 which had a faulty back panel (didn’t think it was a bad tv, other than Sony saying it was fine when there was a clear fault) and then a Samsung Q60 (When I think the picture quality is somewhat worse).

I want a decent TV that can handle dark scenes when watching tv and films, so there’s no light bleeding, or pixelated black areas.

Under £1000 if anyone has any recommendations.

The picture is from the Samsung, never seen anything like it with darkened areas.

Only had the Samsung since Thursday, going back to the store tomorrow.
should not be that bad, looks faulty to me.
 

elthomp0777

Standard Member
LG C1 55" £1099.
LG A1 55" £789.

The A1 is the cut down version, not as bright with lesser video processing features, if your not too fussy it will do the job, your getting the main benefit of image quality from the OLED panel.
Can I watch actually TV on it 😂 without any blurring, blacks being fuzzy, light bleeding etc.
 

mikej

Well-known Member
Any recommendations? Would they be under £1000??
A quick look on the Richer Sounds site shows you can get 55" OLEDs from LG and Philips for under £1000 which should definitely do the job but if you can, I would recommend pushing the budget to £1100-1200 and getting either the 55" LG C1 or Panasonic JZ1000.

Traditionally, LG's strength has been with it's advanced gaming features and Panasonic's strength is with it's out-of-the-box picture quality, but I'm not fully up-to-speed with the latest models so you would need to check reviews to see if this is still the case. I've had my Panasonic GZ950 OLED for around 2.5 years now and have been very pleased with it.

Make sure you read up on the differences between OLED and LCD screen technologies first though, as there are pros and cons for each.

Whatever you end up going for, I would recommend buying from a retailer who include a free extended warranty to make life a lot easier in the event of any problems. I favour Richer Sounds, but John Lewis, Costco and AV specialists like Crampton & Moore are other options.
 

mikej

Well-known Member
Can I watch actually TV on it 😂 without any blurring, blacks being fuzzy, light bleeding etc.
OLEDs don't suffer from light bleed because individual pixels can be turned on and off, so there is no light behind the panel to cause light bleed or 'blooming' around bright objects on screen like you can sometimes get on LCD TVs.

'Fuzzy blacks' can be down to a number of things. Always check review for comments about 'near-black handling', as this can vary between different OLEDs. The quality of the content you're watching and the picture settings you choose will also make a difference. Modern 4K OLEDs (and LCDs) are only ever going to be at their best with the best quality sources available - a TV can only work with what it's given and if that isn't good enough (ie. a poor quality, low bitrate stream or movie file), then it's going to struggle.

As for blurring, I can't speak for LCDs but what tends to be more of an issue motion-wise on an OLED is stutter which is caused by the 'sample and hold' technology that OLEDs use, coupled with the relatively low frame rates used in a lot of the content we watch. Slow panning shots featuring vertical lines (especially with white or light backgrounds) can expose this weakness. Thankfully, it's not something I see often, myself. You can smooth things out by turning on a TV's motion interpolation settings, but this can make motion look unnatural (the so-called Soap Opera Effect). Many people can watch OLEDs with motion interpolation turned off without any issues and others (including myself) have to find a compromise with interpolation settings turned on, but at lower levels. My advice as far as OLED motion goes is to try and view an OLED or two before you buy and experiment with a range of different content to see if you're susceptible.
 

elthomp0777

Standard Member
OLEDs don't suffer from light bleed because individual pixels can be turned on and off, so there is no light behind the panel to cause light bleed or 'blooming' around bright objects on screen like you can sometimes get on LCD TVs.

'Fuzzy blacks' can be down to a number of things. Always check review for comments about 'near-black handling', as this can vary between different OLEDs. The quality of the content you're watching and the picture settings you choose will also make a difference. Modern 4K OLEDs (and LCDs) are only ever going to be at their best with the best quality sources available - a TV can only work with what it's given and if that isn't good enough (ie. a poor quality, low bitrate stream or movie file), then it's going to struggle.

As for blurring, I can't speak for LCDs but what tends to be more of an issue motion-wise on an OLED is stutter which is caused by the 'sample and hold' technology that OLEDs use, coupled with the relatively low frame rates used in a lot of the content we watch. Slow panning shots featuring vertical lines (especially with white or light backgrounds) can expose this weakness. Thankfully, it's not something I see often, myself. You can smooth things out by turning on a TV's motion interpolation settings, but this can make motion look unnatural (the so-called Soap Opera Effect). Many people can watch OLEDs with motion interpolation turned off without any issues and others (including myself) have to find a compromise with interpolation settings turned on, but at lower levels. My advice as far as OLED motion goes is to try and view an OLED or two before you buy and experiment with a range of different content to see if you're susceptible.
Thank you for going to the trouble with all this info, greatly appreciated!

The store for price £100 init, have recommended the Samsung Q80 or LG A1? C1 is about £250 more ontop.
 

Kapkirk

Active Member
OLEDs don't suffer from light bleed because individual pixels can be turned on and off, so there is no light behind the panel to cause light bleed or 'blooming' around bright objects on screen like you can sometimes get on LCD TVs.

'Fuzzy blacks' can be down to a number of things. Always check review for comments about 'near-black handling', as this can vary between different OLEDs. The quality of the content you're watching and the picture settings you choose will also make a difference. Modern 4K OLEDs (and LCDs) are only ever going to be at their best with the best quality sources available - a TV can only work with what it's given and if that isn't good enough (ie. a poor quality, low bitrate stream or movie file), then it's going to struggle.

As for blurring, I can't speak for LCDs but what tends to be more of an issue motion-wise on an OLED is stutter which is caused by the 'sample and hold' technology that OLEDs use, coupled with the relatively low frame rates used in a lot of the content we watch. Slow panning shots featuring vertical lines (especially with white or light backgrounds) can expose this weakness. Thankfully, it's not something I see often, myself. You can smooth things out by turning on a TV's motion interpolation settings, but this can make motion look unnatural (the so-called Soap Opera Effect). Many people can watch OLEDs with motion interpolation turned off without any issues and others (including myself) have to find a compromise with interpolation settings turned on, but at lower levels. My advice as far as OLED motion goes is to try and view an OLED or two before you buy and experiment with a range of different content to see if you're susceptible.
Only ever having owned Plasma and OLED I have never really seen the limitations of a normal LCD like the blooming etc. The only thing that bugs me from time to time with my Panny OLED is sometimes when images move from the right to left of the screen I do see an annoying judder, it can be mitigated a little with turning on the IFC to low, I simply don't put this setting on higher as I don't like the way the image speeds up. BFI just gives me an instant headache. I really wish someday they would create a TV with the Plasma's motion handling and all the benefits of OLED.
 

The latest video from AVForums

Samsung S95B QD OLED Review - A Quantum Leap for OLED!
Subscribe to our YouTube channel
Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom