Help PAL NTSC DVD Player TV Combination

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by mac10, Mar 16, 2006.

  1. mac10

    mac10
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    Can someone please help explain to me these questions?

    I have a pal tv and a multiregoin dvd player if i buy a region 1 dvd would that mean the dvd player would output ntsc which my tv wouldnt support?

    And vice versa a ntsc tv with a multiregion and usinig a region 2 pal dvd wouldnt work?

    If there is a better forum title to post in please advise alhtough i have checked through them all and there isnt a general av forum as far as i could see.
     
  2. stevelup

    stevelup
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    If both the DVD player and TV have RGB SCARTS, you will most likely be fine.

    If either device does not have an RGB SCART, then the TV will need to have an NTSC video decoder.

    If you tell us what equipment you've got, you'll get a more accurate response!
     
  3. LV426

    LV426
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    A TV signal can be described using three factors:

    1: The line frequency
    2: The field frequency
    3: The colour carrier.

    The terms PAL and NTSC are actually shorthand. Normally:

    PAL is used to mean 625/50/PAL and
    NTSC for 525/60/NTSC.

    Now, most modern European TVs will happily handle either type of line and field frequency but some won't handle the "wrong" colour carrier. In other words, can do 625/50/PAL and can also do 525/60/(but not NTSC colour).

    Many DVD players offer two ways to solve this.

    The first and best is to use RGB signal. RGB DOES have a line and field frequency which matches the source, but the colour carrier here is RGB and not either PAL or NTSC. In other words, depending on the disc, you might be outputting 625/50/RGB or 525/60/RGB. So long as the TV can handle both line and field frequencies, and has an RGB input, this will work.

    If RGB isn't an option, many DVD players also have the option to change the colour carrier from NTSC discs to PAL, while leaving the line and field frequencies unchanged. This ends up being 525/60/PAL (which is a non-standard protocol except in Brazil). AKA PAL60 or Pseudo-PAL. If your TV can handle the line and field frequencies (525/60) but not NTSC colour, then it will handle PAL60.

    TVs sold in the US are often a different matter. Whilst the above principles are still true, many US TVs have no ability to handle the 625/50 frequencies and so cannot reproduce a PAL signal whatever you do to it. And RGB is rare on US sets as well. They have a tendency to use a similar but incompatible protocol - "Component". Like RGB, Component is "immune" to the colour carrier differences but is not immune to the line and field rates. So, if the TV won't reproduce 625/50 then playing PAL discs isn't an option.
     

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