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Help moving W10 to SSD

HeadBanger

Well-known Member
I've just bought a new tower PC from HP which came with a 500GB SSD and 2TB HDD. I set it all up yesterday only to discover that Windows has been wrongly installed on the HDD rather than the SSD!

I've installed Macrium to try and clone the HDD to the SDD but it refuses saying that there is insufficient space due to a large 1.82TB partition on the HDD.

Can someone kindly help me and advise the easiest way to get the OS onto the SDD please?

TIA

HB
 

maf1970

Well-known Member
I've installed Macrium to try and clone the HDD to the SDD but it refuses saying that there is insufficient space due to a large 1.82TB partition on the HDD.
You'll get that message because the drive is bigger than the SSD. To get round that you will have to shrink the partition size of Windows first. That takes time.
I would just disconnect the 2TB drive then reboot the machine and then install Windows to the SSD. Reboot the machine after install to make sure it starts OK then shutdown and reconnect the 2TB drive. Reboot machine and either format the 2TB drive or just delete everything on it.
 

DavidG1

Active Member
You need to shrink the partition so it will fit. You can then clone the HDD. Windows 10 already provides shrinking tools in disk management. I would also include any other partitions in the clone otherwise you may get a boot error.
Alternatively do a clean install directly onto the SSD using windows media creation tool, disconnect the HDD first. You will need a blank 8GB USB to create a bootable installer. Here is a link:
Windows media creation tool

You will end up with a generic W10 install, you can install any additional software from the HP support site
 
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techquest

Well-known Member
You can resize the HDD by using shrink volume in Disk Manager, it's simple to use and probably will take all of 10 mins max.

Type disk manager in search

Right click on you HDD

Click shrink volume

Reduce it to 500GB - It will only do this if the data on the drive is no bigger than that. It will not harm the data on the drive.

Or do as @maf1970 says and just create W10 on the new SSD. But leave the HDD and old SSD unplugged as W10 will try to create the new installation on one of those drives.

Once done then plug the other drives in and do what you need to do with the data. Doing it this way round though a new installation would be a new account and would not have the permissions to access the files on your old C drive. You will have to give permission for windows to do anything with them , as they're effectively controlled and locked to your account on that drive. This will take considerable time for windows to do the necessary.

Once you've got at the data and done what you want with it you can then delete the old windows installation on that drive.

Any problems, or if you need more help then let us know.
 

HeadBanger

Well-known Member
Many thanks. I have tried shrinking but no matter what I shrink it by Macrium still complains that there is not is not enough space.
1575725218499.png

What am I doing wrong?

TIA

HB
 

techquest

Well-known Member
I can see what it is from the screen shot.

Just uncheck disk 4 in the local disk (top section). Macrium is assuming you want to image that drive too. You can always image that when you've sorted your new SSD.

When you've got Macrium to do what it needs to do you can the use the image to restore it to your new SSD. That's the a good thing about Macrium, it allows you to put the image on a completely different drive, provided there's sufficient space.

Let us know if this works. If you need further help I'm staying on here for a while and will keep an eye open for your posts
 
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HeadBanger

Well-known Member
Thank you!

Should I expand the original partition back to the 500GB that it should have been in the first shrink? I kept shrinking hoping it would eventually run.

And I'm cloning the HDD to the SDD thinking I can just then change the boot order. Is this the correct option?

HB
 

techquest

Well-known Member
You don't need to do that if you don't want. But if you do then it will have more space on it.

Just use Drive Manger again and right click on the drive and the extend volume, no larger than you new SSD though..
 

techquest

Well-known Member
You only need enough space on you C: (OS) drive to manage W10, about 45GB. Mine is 100 GB to allow for programs, apps etc.

You really should be putting you data on another partition/drive so that in the event of a failure it's only the OS you need to rebuild.
 

HeadBanger

Well-known Member
OK thanks I'll expand back.

Out of interest - why did Macrium not like the 4th partition - it's relatively tiny (641 MB) and there was ample space on the SDD to include this?

Will Windows create the recovery partition itself once the SDD is running?

Thanks again.

HB
 

techquest

Well-known Member
I think it's because your SSD only has three partitions whereas your HDD has 4 and therefor Macrium is having a problem as there is no 4th partition on the SSD to copy #4 to.

Let me just take a look at what your trying to achieve again and then let you know exactly what to do.

But just to confirm.

You have a 500GB SSD - Disk 1 on Macrium

+

a 2TB HDD Disk 2 - on Macrium

W10 has installed the OS on Disk 2

So looking at this I think it is as I said above.
 

techquest

Well-known Member
The only partition you really need to copy is #3 on Disk 2, the HDD. The other partitions required for windows to work are already created on Disk 1.

So image just #3 on Disk 2
then do a restore in Macrium to #3 on Disk 1 and that should work.
 

techquest

Well-known Member
If you just want to do a fresh install of W10 then unplug the Disk 2, the HDD and this way W10 will install to the SSD. This will of course take longer than the restore method in Macrium.
 

HeadBanger

Well-known Member
Yes, I've a 2TB HDD with W10 installed rather than on the 500 GB SDD.

I am trying to clone the current W10 instal onto the SDD. I had shrunk down to 400GB because Macrium kept saying not enough space. Do the partitions need to be set up on the clone SDD to match those of the original HDD before running then?

I thought that it would clone/mirror the drives and partitions extactly?

Unfortunately, Macrium is now reporting an error:

1575727928550.png


I don't know how I have managed corrupt data so quickly (the PC is one day old!).

Any ideas?

Many thanks,

HB
 

techquest

Well-known Member
Don't panic you don't have corrupt data it's just Macrium having an issue with what your trying to do.

Let me just look at your info in the screen shots. I'm going to send a conversation message a s it will probably be easier to talk that way, okay.
 

techquest

Well-known Member
I would suggest run chkdsk on the HDD then try the clone again, disabling your AV software
Yes the chkdsk could be run but that's not the problem here, it's just a slight confusion on terminology re using Macrium.

You don't need to disable the AV for Macrium to work.
 
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EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
You really should be putting you data on another partition/drive so that in the event of a failure it's only the OS you need to rebuild.
It's generally not worth doing these days. Windows has such good long term stability you'll spend more time changing installation paths and similar than it'll every save you in rebuild time.

On a new machine I wouldn't bother trying to clone the existing install but just grab the Windows 10 install creator from the Microsoft website and do a fresh install:

A tower isn't likely to have any heavily custom hardware you'll need to source drivers for, and big system builders have a poor reputation for including unnecessary junk in default installs.

The fresh install will set up all the appropriate partitions.
 

techquest

Well-known Member
Apparently Error 9 is quite a common problem with Macrium, the general suggestion is to try an a different cloning software such as Easus
Just talking @HeadBanger through it in a conversation and appears to have got image and restore to SSD done now.
 

techquest

Well-known Member
It's generally not worth doing these days. Windows has such good long term stability you'll spend more time changing installation paths and similar than it'll every save you in rebuild time.

On a new machine I wouldn't bother trying to clone the existing install but just grab the Windows 10 install creator from the Microsoft website and do a fresh install:

A tower isn't likely to have any heavily custom hardware you'll need to source drivers for, and big system builders have a poor reputation for including unnecessary junk in default installs.

The fresh install will set up all the appropriate partitions.
Thanks but I guess we all do things differently. In this case the necessary partitions on the SSD have been created for W10 to boot, so 10 mins for the restore of the OS to the SSD and it's all up and operational.

But let's see what happens as the restore has completed and HB is going through the process of a reboot, having of course selected the SSD as the new boot device.
 

techquest

Well-known Member
It's all up and operational now. The problems were just down to terminology and understanding of how Macrium works. In the first screen shot supplied there were 4 partitions on the source drive and only 3 partitions on the destination drive, Easy to spot, if you understand Macrium, but not otherwise, so this is why Macrium was having problems.

@HeadBanger got there very quickly and didn't need a lot of help, just some guidance in understanding the terminology re the various processes in Macrium.

His SSD is now running his system.
 
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HeadBanger

Well-known Member
Thank you techquest. I think that you are being a little too kind - I did need you to guide me through some pretty basic stuff but I got there with your help and patience!

Thanks again - really appreciate you taking time out on a Saturday to help a novice.😃

HB
 

techquest

Well-known Member
No novice and a good listener, who understands the need for a step by step approach and is easy to work with :thumbsup:

Some you win some you lose. The forum won this one.
 

HeadBanger

Well-known Member
Yes, we won this one!

One last question / request for advice please?

Now that I have a hybrid SDD/HDD PC am I right to assume that all programs should be installed and run from the SDD and that all files (Excel, music, videos etc.) should be stored on the HDD - is this correct or wrong or are there exceptions to this?

I'm just looking to use them in the best way and get a long life (or longer!) out of both.

Thanks,

HB
 

techquest

Well-known Member
You can do it that way as your SSD is faster, You could also put the programs on SSD but have the documents save to the HDD. Not sure if it's the same now with Word, Excel etc but windows would auto save files to the OS drive and not any other drive. Will check to see if this is still current.

But if it was me I would have all my data stored on the HDD so as in the event of an SSD failure, you have only lost the OS, though you could have an event where both drives fail.

Also note with Macrium you can do incremental backups to the image, that way you always have your most recent OS along with any updates installed after your initial image was made.

You can also create a USB rescue device, USB stick, which is handy to have around in the event of drive failures.
 
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EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
The big advantage of an SSD is access time, it's very quick to start reading files compared to a hard drive.

So maximum benefit comes when you're dealing with small files, when the amount of time to get the head into position to read them on a hard drive is a large percentage of the time it takes to read them.

The program/data advice is because a lot of programs read and write small files - such as cookies in a web browser - while a lot of user files tend to be fairly large such as photos and videos.


SSDs are outright faster so you want to put everything on there that'll fit* and if you had to use the hard drive best to use it for larger files. Video files are ideal.

*Although some SSDs do slow down markedly once they get nearly full so you may need to treat the as 80-90% mark as full if you notice anything at that point.
 

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