Question Help me fix my mess of a powerline network.

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by IrritatedBadger, Jul 18, 2015.

  1. IrritatedBadger

    IrritatedBadger
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    One house.
    One separate garage.

    BT HomeHub 3 with Infinity Option 2 (70Mb minimum usually).

    Ethernet 20M CAT5E cable hanging outside exposed connecting the 2 building, through a window into a TP Link TL-PA411 (AV500) in the garage.

    2 more (3 total) TL-PA411's (AV500) in the garage.
    1 of the TL-PA411's is connected to my Asus RT-N66U (acting as a access point to extend wireless coverage) which is hardwired to my Xbox One, 360, AVR. The other is connected
    1 x TL-PA211 (AV200) in there also.

    I was getting a consistent 70Mb down. Now I'm getting closer to 30Mb. Nothing on my network has changed other than me upgrading the firmware on the devices. Screenshot below showing the devices as AV200 when some should be AV500. The device at the top is the
    homeplug I am connected to.

    [​IMG]

    What am I doing wrong?
     
  2. mickevh

    mickevh
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    I struggle to understand why you need powerline comms at all. If the two buildings are linked by ethernet, then that is far superior to powerline. I'm not sure what "problem" the powerline devices are solving, perhaps you can develop that point.

    If you need more ethernet ports in the garage, I'd install an ethernet switch (cheap as chips) that end of the build-to-building ethernet link and break that out as necessary (including the wi-fi AP) in the garage. If your Asus router has a switch built it, you could use that as a combination switch/AP (have a read of the "using two routers together" FAQ pinned in this forum.)

    Similarly, if you need a powerline link between the garage and house, I'd use a single link between the buildings then break it out in the garage with a switch or a switch/router combination.

    HomePlugs use an "only on can transmit at a time" paradigm (at does Wi-Fi incidentally - technically it's called "half duplex") so the more HomePlugs you have plugged into you mains, the more they have to contend with each other for a transmit opportunity. Thus it's in your interest to minimise the number of HomePlugs to reduce the amount of time they spend "competing" with each other for transmit time which in turn increases the the throughput a little (though it probably won't be miraculous.)

    However, which of this advice is appropriate depends on why you're using so many HomePlugs in your garage.
     
  3. IrritatedBadger

    IrritatedBadger
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    Managed to fix it by resetting the network name.

    The reason I have so many is so I don't have to run long cables down the room and add to the clutter.

    Also I have more ethernet ports this way and can have X1, AVR, Xbox 360, Mac plugged into router at one end. At the other, 2 PC's hardwired too. I realize it's not the most optimal network, but I hate cable running across floor.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2015
  4. mickevh

    mickevh
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    Must be a big garage then. Not that I'm at all bitter - I don't have a garage at all. :D
     
  5. IrritatedBadger

    IrritatedBadger
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    No it's actually rather small about 5m in length. My parents paid to convert it from a crappy old decaying thing to a room for all my tech! I value the sound of silence and can blast music as loud as I want! It does get insanely hot and stuffy in there though and there's no ventilation besides a small ineffective window but it's mine. :D
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2015
  6. mickevh

    mickevh
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    You could always consider "burying" the cables in something called "cable trunking." Such is a long thin plastic box with a removable lid (a bit like tupperware) available in various cross sections and (usually) 2m lengths. The small section stuff often has an adhesive backing strip so you don't even need to screw it down. Stick trunking on the walls (etc.) run cables through it, then pop the lid on and it's all hidden and out of the way.

    I put in a few lengths of trunking to hide some cables "nailed to the top of skirting boards" and it looks so much neater. At work, we use it everywhere we need to hide cables.
     

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