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Help - In trouble with wife over HS1

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by void, Feb 20, 2002.

  1. void

    void
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    OK, I really need your help here. I am completely new to this and it is my first post. Basically, I took a salespersons advice and put a deposit on a VPL-HS1 after convincing the wife we really needed it. Then I decided to find something out about projectors, and now I am wondering if I have made the right choice (Wrong order?). I have learnt a lot from you guys already, but not enough to make a clear choice.
    I intended mounting the HS1 on a shelf near the top of the rear wall. I now believe this will be a problem as the keystone correction only works for below screen height? I am also wondering wether a couple of hundred extra pounds would be money well spent. A Philips UGO Xlite is within range and its XGA, or a Philips Monroe has been suggested to me. Would I be better going for these, or can you suggest another good option for £2000 (gbp) or less?

    Thanks,
     
  2. Chris Frost

    Chris Frost
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    The Sony is designed for table top use. Mounting it on a high shelf will probably mean you use all of the electronic keystone correction and still don't produce a square picture :eek:

    You mention a couple of Philips projectors. The X-Lite has been popular because of its small size and range of features including keystone correction. A new version is due in early March:- X-Lite Impact, which is 25% brighter and has a zoom lens rather than a fixed lens, so it may be possible to pick up an X-Lite at a good price.

    The Monroe has won several Best Buy awards. It is quiet (32dB) and the pixels are very close together which makes a very smooth image for LCD. It has some nice features which make it suitable for use with either 4:3 or true 16:9 screens, and there is the bonus of long lamp life - 6000 hours average use, so very low running costs without sacrificing brightness.

    The Panasonic 100 is popular right now, and old favourites like the Sanyo PLV30 still produce a great image in the right conditions. I'm sure other forum members will chip in with their recommendations.

    Regards
     
  3. gavan

    gavan
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    I'd second what Chris says - I did such a thing myself for my HS1 and now have four useless holes in the wall to show for it :(


    OTOH the 'table top' nature of the projector should actually be more wife-friendly .... it's easy to hide away both the projector and the supplied screen when you aren't using them and to simply bring them out and set them up for 'event viewing'. I'd estimate 4-5 minutes would be enough.


    I have seen claims from a couple of Aussies that the projector had an upside down mode and could be ceiling mounted via a mount Sony sell over there ... but as far as I can see there's no such mode on mine.

    Hang about - maybe that 'upside down' stuff is an essential modification for the Aussie market (think about it) ;)


    Gav
     
  4. gavan

    gavan
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    PS. Don't forget that you can put the projector off to the side of the room and use 'side shot' mode. Maybe that's why Sony don't appear to have put any effort into ceiling mounting capabilities.

    disclaimer: Check out the sideshot mode first - it leaves a sort of 'LCD shadow' (where a mask is applied) in the shape of the pre-correction distorted frame, around the corrected picture.


    Gav
     
  5. void

    void
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    Thanks for your responses.
    Unfortunately, I wasn't aware of the projectors 'table top' nature when I reserved it. I am currently buying a new house which is being built. This gives me a great opportunity to hide all the wires within the wall but I would like a projector that could sit higher up. It would also be nice if the unit wasn't so deep for shelf mounting, and if it had a VGA port to connect to my PC.
    My problem is that there are no projector shops near where I live, and I had to travel 60 miles to see the HS1. I would intend seeing any projector before buying, but need help to narrow the field first. If anyone can suggest a projector that they think is as good or better image quality, and has these other functions, but still in my price range, I will arrange a viewing.

    Thanks again,

    PS. Chris Frost
    On paper the X-Lite looks a much better spec than the HS1. The only draw back seems to be the fixed focus. Do you know what projection sizes and distances this produces?
     
  6. skimber

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    I've seen the S-lite, X-lite and Panasonic AE-100

    In my opinion the Panasonic wins hands down, especially if you're prone to the rainbow effect on DLP projectors
     
  7. Jeff

    Jeff
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    The S/X-lites (Plus U3 clones) have useless video processing in them, if you feed then a progressive native resolution signal then they're pretty good. Rainbows will be there being DLP but they do at least use a 2 speed colour wheel. Very different projectors to these new budget HT projectors but they can be good in the right circumstances.
     
  8. void

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    I intend to use my PC for both DVD and games. For that reason I dont think the Panasonic is the best option for me. I assume that this would bypass any video processing inefficiencies that the S/X-Lite have. Would this also improve the rainbow effect, or is that not connected. I have not yet seen a DLP projector to see if I am vulnerable to its effects.

    Thanks,
     
  9. Jeff

    Jeff
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    Try to get a demo of a DLP because the rainbow effect might drive you potty. If you do see rainbows the effect tends to become less bothersome after time. Rainbows are very source dependant, so when you have a demo its important to try a rainbow prone DVD. A good one is Unbreakable chapters 22 and onwards, Gladiator is also a good test. Other films you might not see rainbows at all or just on a few occasions during the film.
     
  10. skimber

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    the best possible picture on the panasonic comes from using a VGA input... According to a few people on this forum, If you use powerstrip to set up the exact resolution of the Panasonic's LCD panel you can get some incredible results...
     
  11. Chris Frost

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    For the X-Lite: Screen Width x 1.6 = Throw Distance

    e.g. 6ft wide screen x 1.6 = 9.6ft

    The calculation is accurate to +/- 5%


    If you only have the screen diagonal measurement you can calculate screen width like this:

    For 4:3 ratio screens: Diagonal / 5 x 4 = Screen Width

    e.g. 80" diagonal / 5 x 4 = 64" wide


    For 16:9 ratio screens: Diagonal / 18.35 x 16 = Screen Width

    e.g. 80" diagonal / 18.35 x 16 = 70" wide

    Regards
     
  12. gavan

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    update: See the other thread: "Celing Mount for HS1 " in case you missed it. Looks like there IS hope.......

    Gav
     

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