Help choosing best laptop for under £1k

theredindian

Novice Member
What is your budget?
£1000

What size laptop do you want?

13 or 14 inch

Do you have resolution requirements?

must display 1080

Do you prefer a matte or glossy (reflective) screen?

No preference

What will you be using the laptop for?

Web Browsing, Word processing, Excel, SQL Server. Tableau. Must be able to handle processing of large amounts of data

How long does the battery need to last?
Ideally more than 8 hours

Does it need to be portable?

Yes please

Do you require Blu-Ray?

No

Do you require HDMI output?

Yes please

Do you have a preferred brand?

Not sure what the most reliable brands are nowadays, so open to suggestions

Are there brands you would prefer to avoid?

Not sure what the most reliable brands are nowadays, so open to suggestions

Would you be happy with a refurbished laptop?
Not keen on refurbished products

Any other details you feel necessary

I'm not sure what the best type of processor is nowadays. AMD or Intel?

Also, are parts easily replaceable once the laptop is out of warranty? I've heard that certain brands weld in hard drives and other parts nowadays

512gb hard drive is sufficient as files will be saved on an external NAS

Ideally would like the spec to be future proof for the next 5 years
 

cedge

Active Member
I'm considering this one at the moment (ASUS ROG Zephyrus Ryzen 5 4600HS) for a desktop replacement and again to last me a few years and be sufficient for my photo editing work and some light video editing work. Argos has it for £900 at the moment which seems a good price.
 

theredindian

Novice Member
Interesting, I will add that to my list of options to check out.

Since my post, I have been looking at the Lenovo Yoga Slim 7 (AMD Ryzen 7 4800U) whenever it goes on sale. As it looks lightweight and portable even though it has great specs. There's an intel version as well, but the AMD version seems to score better in the benchmark tests
 

Atomic77

Active Member
As far as the best Brands go I don't know about computers in Europe or the UK but here in the US the big Brands are HP and Dell and theres Lenovo but I don't know much about that either.
 

outoftheknow

Moderator
Purely from personal experience in the past I wouldn’t buy another Asus. Nor Toshiba.

Three Asus have variously slowed down and eventually refused to be brought to life with any and all levels of recovery and one Toshiba had a very poor quality screen connection.

I have switched to pretty much only HP for laptops in recent years.

Lenovo is IBM as bought by the Chinese so the basis of the laptops is sound. I haven’t any experience of Lenovo laptops but went with them for a desktop a couple of years ago.

(My laptop’s past performances are no guarantee the same brand now won’t perform flawlessly)
 

Atomic77

Active Member
In my personal opinion I would say one persons experience does not dictate how a product will do for another person. So in other words get what you think you want and feel is the best for you.
 

theredindian

Novice Member
thanks for the responses, I've used Asus and Acer laptops in the past, whilst I like Asus their laptops tend to age quickly imo, so I am looking to try an alternative brand. I'm also not to keen on Dell due to reliability issues and poor customer support reviews.
 

silent ninja

Well-known Member
Not sure I agree with any of the championing of certain brands above. It's all anecdotal and specific. They are largely commodities products sold to a price and are roughly the same in reliability.

Laptops are commodities these days - much like white goods like fridges and washing machines. The parts are all mass produced commodities. Manufacturers also build laptops largely in the same way. All this means is that from a manufacturer's point of view efficiency in sourcing and manufacturing is king. They have very little space to differentiate - marketing and brand, perhaps some OEM software, or maybe slightly better customer services. They compete on cost largely and because it's about efficiency, they minimise acceptable quality to meet the cost. The defect rate is around the same for every manufacture. Look at "cheap" brands like Hwawei or Xiami, they are just as reliable as Dell or HP.

The premium model end is where you see a little more differentiation only because fewer are made and they spend slightly more in manufacture and more on parts - XPS 13, MacBook Pro and equivalents. You could get a laptop for £500 with 80% of the performance as these, but you pay 4-5 times as much for that small 10-20% bump in "quality". There is a small improvement in defects, but you could still get a dud - to eradicate defects the cost is just not feasible.

If you've had a dud or bad experience with a particular laptop/brand, biases aside, you're just as likely or unlikely to have a dud with another brand. It's like buying a hard drive - most are fantastic, the odd few fail.

My advice. Just look at laptop forums and user reviews for common faults, otherwise look for a good returns policy and warranty, then hit the buy button and roll the dice. 98% of the time you'll be fine. No need to limit your choice based on an imaginary superior brand- there isn't one in this space.
 

Atomic77

Active Member
In reality when it comes to laptops all most anything is good as long as it does what you need it to do.
 

tickedon

Well-known Member
Interesting, I will add that to my list of options to check out.

Since my post, I have been looking at the Lenovo Yoga Slim 7 (AMD Ryzen 7 4800U) whenever it goes on sale. As it looks lightweight and portable even though it has great specs. There's an intel version as well, but the AMD version seems to score better in the benchmark tests
The new AMD Ryzen 4000 series processors are great and what I would have recommended, as they are still new not all the models with them are out yet, but definitely worth waiting for. It's based on a much smaller manufacturing process (7nm) than Intel (10nm or 14nm depending on model) so AMD can provide better performance at a lower power usage and heat. Intel have refined their 10 & 14nm processes are remaining competitive-ish - but generally at a much higher price.

Lenovo is probably the manufacturer with the most AMD models coming out at the moment. The Yoga Slim 7 is probably as good as anything you can get!
 

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