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Help/Advice needed please Canon EOS 1000D vs Canon EOS M vs a another compact

Blinkensnout

Active Member
Hi all,

We currently have a Canon EOS 1000D with a couple of different lenses which we have owned for a good few years now. This is our first DSLR and to be honest it spends most of its time in full auto mode due to our lack of photography knowledge, we have dabbled in the manual settings and have bought a "for dummies" book to help us along.

We are taking our son on his first foreign holiday at the end of May and obvioulsy want to capture as much of it as possible on camera/light videos. we dont really want the hassle of taking the bid DSLR around with us all day so was looking for a decent compact camera.

In looking around i have spotted the EOS M which appeals as it seems to provide quality snaps and be somewhat smaller with the added benefit of using the exisitng canon lenses to support the supplied lens with the use of the adapter.

My main question is really is the EOS M a direct replacement for the 1000D given our limited camera skills etc or should we be looking at/for a true compact to run alongside the DSLR? my thoughts being if we went for the M i would sell the DSLR if we got something else (suggestions welcome) then i would probably keep the DSLR.

Many thanks for any help/advice you may have.

Cheers,

Chris
 

SixToes

Standard Member
EOS M is a nice system, you can get great images with it but it can be a bit slow to focus at times compared to an SLR. You still need to learn how to use it to get the best from it, if you think you are going to stick to the auto modes then it seems to me you might be happier with a high end compact like the Canon G16 / Panasonic LX7 / Sony RX100 II or a faster and easier CSC like an m43 / Sony Nex. These are all a lot newer than a 1000D and will have better/easier to use movie modes, and shouldn't be far away in terms of high ISO performance.

What are the lenses you have with your 1000D, is it the two kit lenses? If so you aren't that deep in, so if you decided that the SLR route isn't for you it won't cost you too much to swap to something you prefer.

The point of the camera is to help you memorise the precious time with your child while you are on holiday without you having to worry about it too much - so think about how you will use it, how much complexity you are willing to embrace, how much time you have to learn how to use your equipment BEFORE you go away, and then decide based on that.

I hope that helps, let me know if you have any follow up questions.
 

FlyingShrapnel

Well-known Member
The point of the camera is to help you memorise the precious time with your child while you are on holiday without you having to worry about it too much - so think about how you will use it, how much complexity you are willing to embrace, how much time you have to learn how to use your equipment BEFORE you go away, and then decide based on that.

Summed it all up there :smashin:

imo, for holiday shots, it would be better to have a camera you are familiar with and comfortable using, so you dont miss the moments whilst setting it up/changing settings. If you arent too heavily invested in the Canon system, you could always sell it and switch. Maybe try going to your local camera shop and have a play with all brands and systems (DSLR, Micro 4/3, Mirrorless of other sensor sizes, compacts) and see which fits you the best. Things worth thinking about would be ergonomics/handling, ease of use, potential for future expansion (if required). I would imagine image quality would be largely the same for all the choices unless you really scrutinise the images.

Good luck in your search :)
 

AMc

Distinguished Member
My 2p - if you want to learn photography as a hobby in itself then the 1000D is a good place to begin and you won't see much benefit moving to the EOS-M, once you're using the adapter for Canon's standard DSLR lenses then the smaller body size isn't that significant IMHO. The number of small M lenses for the Canon is pretty limited IIRC.
I tried the EOS-M when I was choosing my Olympus E-PL5. I liked the camera as it felt like a "grown up" version of my Canon compacts and the touch screen interface was nice but the range of native small lenses was tiny, Canon's commitment to the format seemed a bit sketchy and the Olympus was a better deal.

FWIW I bought a micro 4/3rds compact system camera and now have a few lenses but I still have a Canon compact as my carry everywhere camera. The CSC goes to a lot more places than my old DSLR did but it doesn't go everywhere.

If you just want to take great pictures of your kid and holiday on "auto" and don't think you'll be buying lenses and doing lots of processing then I would look at buying one of the premium compacts that don't have interchangeable lenses. The Sony RX100 is always raved about but there are plenty of others which will give you good image and video quality in a more portable camera.
 

Blinkensnout

Active Member
Guys thank you all for your input this far it has been more than helpful.

To answer SixToes original question the lenses we have with the DSLR are the kit 18-55 a 70-300 tamron zoom lens and a fixed 50 canon lens.

From reading and digesting everybody's comments i have almost given up on the EOS M and can see the benefit of the better compact cameras with fixed lens etc.

i have looked at the cameras mentioned and i am more drawn to the Panny LX7 and the Canon G16 mainly on price point TBH the Sony camera does look very good but i don't feel i can justify £400 on a new camera realistically i wanted to spend £200 max (before i saw the EOS M) but it seems i may need to up that to £300 to get the right camera.

My next questions are therefore looking for further opinion on the Panny & Canon compacts from an Auto point and shoot perspective with my very untrained eye they don't appear that different but the panny can be had for a fair amount less than the canon.

Once again thanks for your help this far!

Cheers,

Chris
 

shotokan101

Banned
Panny LX7 will me more than suitable - I owned the previous model LX5 and it was a great compact capable of really good results - only issue was limited zoom range
 

SixToes

Standard Member
I don't really have much to add except to say that your gear will sell easily if you decide you want to get rid of it, and while I've never owned a G series or a Panny LX I know people who have and they seemed happy with them.
 

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