Help a poor, baffled person pick a 2.1 HDMI cable...

Zombie Twin

Well-known Member
I have been looking at Amazon for Ultra High Speed HDMI cable to connect my Panny 820 to a Panny GZ950.

It's sodding baffling! You find a cable, the specs look great and it claims to do all you want it too, but then you read the lower-rated comments and they dispute the specs and abilities you need the damn thing for. The bi-polar, contradictory nature of the reviews and conflicting answers to questions make it really damn hard, and I'm not usually too bad on research.

The pattern goes something like this:

It does 4.4.4. - Apparently not.
Perfectly handles WCG. - Not according to some reviews
Fully certified as being 2.1 8K. - The certification is bogus.
It has no problem with HDR - Think again. Or any other Johnny Ball TV show.

I'm not made of money - I mean I'm not a Czech.* I just need a 2 meter-ish cable which will give me the full experience, as what I have been seeing doesn't appear to be what others are seeing. I keep my expectations realistic, and have tried a few different cables, including ones from KableDirekt, but am not sure if they can't quite handle the signal, in spite of their bold claims.

Can anyone directly recommend me a cable, currently available, with which I can close the door on this thing.

*With thanks to The Young Ones for that gag.
 

Otto Pylot

Member
ATC Certified HDMI cables will come with a scannable QR label on the packaging. If you scan the label and the information matches, then it is an authentic cable.

Passive, certified Ultra High Speed HDMI cables (HDMI 2.1 option sets) are certifiable up to about 16'. The cables are a bit thick so the flexibility needs to be taken into consideration because you don't want any sharp, 90º bends nor undue strain on the HDMI ports. Active UHS HDMI cables(hybrid fiber) can have longer lengths but they are expensive and you may have incompatibility issues with some devices.

Passive, Certified Premium High Speed HDMI cables (HDMI 2.0 option sets) are available in lengths up to 25'. Until recently, active cables, of any kind, were not able to be certified. That has changed with the active hybrid fiber cables so you may be able to find certified, active copper-only cables for the HDMI 2.0 option sets a lengths longer than 25'.

The most reliable connection is a single cable, source to sink. This is especially true for active cables, even tho there are supposed extenders that work with active cables. If your run is in-wall, the use of a conduit is HIGHLY recommended if possible to safe, easy installation of your cable run. It makes for swapping out cables so much easier because chances are you will need to be replacing your cabling someday. Video technology will always outpace connection technology.

Certification is not a guarantee that the cable will work 100% of the time for all devices and setups. The only thing that is guaranteed is that the cable was tested by a standardized testing program designed by HDMI.org and certified by HDMI LA. The cable is just a data pipe. What ultimately decides what you can send and receive are the HDMI chipsets in the source and sink devices.

Cable mfrs will make all kinds of claims and promises in their marketing and product descriptions. Just decide if you need the HDMI 2.0 option sets or the HDMI 2.1 option sets, look at your length, and then search for ATC certified cable for the option sets you want and make sure the packaging has the scannable QR label. You may have to try a few cables until you find one that works with your devices, setup, and cable installation. There are no guarantees, hence the idea of having easy access to your cabling.

Oops, forgot a recommendation. For passive, UHS HDMI cables (HDMI 2.1 option sets), Zeskit and Ruipro come to mind. For active, UHS HDMI cables, hybrid fiber cables from either Cable Matters, Maxonar, of Phoossno come to mind. For passive PHS HDMI cables (HDMI 2.0 option sets), there are lots to choose from (BJC, MediaBridge, Monoprice, etc). Remember, just look for the QR label and pay careful attention to the return policy.

Regardless of what the cable mfr says, the cable can not improve pq. If you don't get sparkles, dropouts, etc your sink is receiving what the source is sending.
 
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Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
If you already have cables and the Source and Display indicate they are Outputting/Receiving the signal formats you are expecting and there are no obvious signs of issues on screen or via your loudspeakers then the cable you have is working as required and there is no need to swap out the cables.

Joe
 

Zombie Twin

Well-known Member
If you already have cables and the Source and Display indicate they are Outputting/Receiving the signal formats you are expecting and there are no obvious signs of issues on screen or via your loudspeakers then the cable you have is working as required and there is no need to swap out the cables.

Joe
What I have had a couple of times is - when putting in a 4K disc - a message appear saying "for the best possible experience, connect to a 4K TV".

Probably a cable fault.
 

Otto Pylot

Member
Both of your devices are HDMI 2.0 so you don't really need an UHS HDMI cable because a PHS HDMI cable will suffice. PHS HDMI cables (certified for HDMI 2.0) are fairly easy to find. You won't get any better performance with a UHS HDMI cable (certified for HDMI 2.1 options).
 

Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
Or someone in the marketing Dept trying to sell you a branded cable :)

Assuming the message goes away and you see 2160p, HDR on your Display you are ‘good to go’!

Joe
 

kdp99

Active Member
8 or so years ago l laid in 4 5m £5 EBay hdmi cables. Went 4K recently all pass it perfectly even with a switch and another cheap 1m cable in the chain. If you get a drop out free 4K picture then you are fine.
 

Otto Pylot

Member
8 or so years ago l laid in 4 5m £5 EBay hdmi cables. Went 4K recently all pass it perfectly even with a switch and another cheap 1m cable in the chain. If you get a drop out free 4K picture then you are fine.
Consider yourself lucky then if one, your 8-year old cables can still carry a 4k HDR signal with no issues and two, you got good cables from eBAY.
 

kdp99

Active Member
Not sure about that, when I fitst got my 4k blue ray player, I had about a dozen assorted 1m to 3m HDMI cables, and I tested each one and only a couple failed. I have read that somewhere between 5m to 10m in length is where 4k gets pickey about cables.
 

Otto Pylot

Member
Not sure about that, when I fitst got my 4k blue ray player, I had about a dozen assorted 1m to 3m HDMI cables, and I tested each one and only a couple failed. I have read that somewhere between 5m to 10m in length is where 4k gets pickey about cables.
I've used my UHD/BD player on 1m and 3m Premium and Ultra High Speed HDMI cables with no issues whatsoever. I have some friends who are using 10m UHS HDMI cables with no issues for 4k HDR. The only issue at about 10m is eARC for some. These are all single cable runs, source to sink with receivers as the hub. I stopped using non-certified cables years ago and have never bothered to test any of the older, non-certified cables that I have in my "electronics" file cabinet (or, as my wife calls it, the junk drawer) on either of my HTS's.

I currently use passive, UHS HDMI cables from Zeskit and Ruipro on my systems.
 

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