Heating question

safcalibur

Distinguished Member
Something I've been wondering about (way too much time on my hands) is the old 'keep heating on constant vs only switch it on when you need it' debate. For the last 3-4 weeks We've kept our heating on constantly controlling it with the thermostat. We keep it on 22 during the day and then turn it down to 19 for the night and its made very little difference to the amount of gas we use (in fact we;re using slightly less).

Recently my mum has come to stay with us and as she's elderly she feels the cold a lot more and requires the temperature to be turned up to about 24-25 degrees C. My question is, apart from the initial usage of gas to get the house to say 25 degrees, would there be much difference in the amount of gas used to maintain it at 25 vs say maintaining the house at 22?

In my head it shouldnt make a difference to the amount used to maintain it and just the initial push to get the house from 22 to 25 would be extra once its reached 25, keeping it there theoretically wouldnt use more than keeping the house at a constant 22 but I've got a feeling my logic in that is flawed somewhere so am hoping you knowledgeable lot would be able to shed some light.

Hopefully I've worded my question well enough that people can understand it, if not i'll clarify

thanks

Saf
 

Cocksure

Well-known Member
Hotter the house, quicker the heat loss. Think of a cup of coffee with no milk, it will cool down to a given temp quicker then coffee with milk in it will. No idea why mind (once @IronGiant bit, twice learned :laugh:)

So the heating will have to run more to keep the house at the higher temperatures. That said how well your house is insulated etc comes into play to
 

nvingo

Well-known Member
Yes, my gut feeling is heat loss will be faster;
If the heating needs be on to maintain temperature then there is heat loss somewhere, the insulation is not 100% effective (it won't be in a domestic house unless you at the very least keep all outside doors/vents permanently airtight).
So where inside air meets outside air, the temperature difference will be greater, the rate of transfer of heat will be greater.
 

rousetafarian

Moderator
Hi

I’m on the mobile website currently but isn’t there a really well established thread for heating, plumbing questions and the like?

Does this need or justify a new thread? (Genuine questions)
 

safcalibur

Distinguished Member
Thanks guys and @rousetafarian my apologies mate I did think to post in the thread you mentioned but sometimes people ask so many questions that some remain unanswered. Happy for you to close though, I think I've got my answer; the greater the difference between the outside and inside temp the faster the heat loss hence heating will have to run more. Am happy for this to be closed/merged mate

thanks

Saf
 
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