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HDTV Has Been Around Since 1934 !!!

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by J80FAB, Jun 22, 2005.

  1. J80FAB

    J80FAB
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  2. David Mackenzie

    David Mackenzie
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    :D I guess switching from whatever number of lines they used to use back then to something higher would be considered HD.
     
  3. ash

    ash
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    LOL!!!!

    Funny, *rushes and bids*
     
  4. Nick_UK

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    In 1934 they had two systems on test....

    1. The Baird 30-line system which was mechanical.

    2. The EMI electronic system which had 405 lines.

    #2 was considered to be "High definition" in those days, and they had demonstration transmissions from Crystal Palace on alternate systems on alternate days. The 405 line system inevitably won, but the transmissions were ceased in 1939 at the outbreak of WW2.
     
  5. Tarbat

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  6. Nick_UK

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    I saw 405 line colour at the Ideal Home Exhibition in the 1950's.

    Correction - on second thoughts, it was the Radio & TV Show (or was it Exhibition ?).
     
  7. Chris Muriel

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    And don't forget that the French had 819 lines (analogue).
    I still have a Sony TV that will cope with that.

    Chris Muriel, Manchester.
     
  8. Stephen Neal

    Stephen Neal
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    Yes - though they started, along with the Germans (or was it the Germans in France) - with 441 lines didn't they?
     
  9. Nick_UK

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    The French always have to be different :devil: :)
     
  10. NicolasB

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    I think Baird's system would have reached 240 lines by then, but possibly not for another year or two.

    Baird died in 1946, but I believe that, at the time, he was working on a 1000 line colour system, and had previously filed patents for a display capable of 1700 lines (interlaced). He could also be said to have invented large-screen televisions, and video discs, among other things.
     
  11. Stephen Neal

    Stephen Neal
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    Yes - the final decision as to which standard the BBC went for was between Baird 240 lines progressive (at 25 frames per sec) and EMI 405 lines interlaced (at 50 fields per sec)

    Whilst the 240 line Baird system was predominantly mechanical based there were Farnsworth Image Disector electronic cameras, and CRT displays in use with it by this point, though the majority of sources (such as the Intermediate Film Transfer and Flying Spot cameras) and displays were mechanical.

    The EMI system was fully-electronic - and the cameras could be easily moved (the Baird IFT film cameras were bolted to the floor to allow the film to pass through it and transfer to the telecine - and there was a significant processing delay between shooting the film, processing it and telecineing it...)

    The Govt chose the EMI 405 line system for the service launch in 1936.
     
  12. Nick_UK

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    When I worked at Rank Cintel in the 1970's, I worked with a man who had been Baird's assistant when he was developing his TV system. Baird was the ultimate showman - he put on a large screen colour display in the Odeon Leicester Square, but the screen caught fire half way through the performance.

    I think Baird's greatest legacy was that he created a lot of interest in TV, although there is very little in modern TV that we can attribute to him.
     
  13. CKNA

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    Yes, but that system was black and white only. When thay switched to color Secam had the same amount of lines as PAL.
     
  14. RecordablDVDfan

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    No surely it would have been colour ? Why was this format chosen I wonder ?
    Even now they use an odd colour system in that although Secam, the video is inverted ! At least they choose the best analogue sound system invented though too late... Nicam
     
  15. Stephen Neal

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    819 was only broadcast in B&W as a service. There are rumours of SECAM tests on that standard though I've never seen documentation.

    AIUI 819 was chosen by the French post-war, when the rest of Europe was settling on 625 lines for their services. Pre-war Europe had been running around the 441ish area for their electronic services (with Germany also running a 180 line system prior to their 441 system ISTR)

    The UK stayed with 405 lines as they had already launched a full-time service in 1936, and chosen a standard for this, before the war, and there were significant (though not huge) numbers of receivers in homes (whose owners would not have been please to have had them rendered obsolete) as well as full production studios and transmission chains already built.

    The French obviously wanted to chose a "better" and "different" system to ensure they had their own market for domestic TVs and were seen to be better than the rest of Europe.

    I think this is also why the French have always ploughed their own furrow in TV terms - using AM sound and positive vision modulation, as well as their own SECAM colour system and their own Antiope text service rather than FM sound, negative vision modulation and PAL or NTSC and World Systems Teletext. However the French have now adopted NICAM stereo (as most previously mono 625 broadcasters have) and WST (I believe Antiope was phased out?)

    AIUI the 819 system used wider vision channels than 625 and 405, though Belgium or Luxembourg used a modified version for a while in a narrower channel spacing - and possibly with different audio spacing? (Or did the French use a narrower version in some channels?)

    ISTR that 819 was so close to twice 405 - and both used positive modulation - so it was sometimes possible to lock an 819 image onto a 405 line set, resulting in two narrow images side by side?
     

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