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HDTV and all these different resolutions makes decision making hard?

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by christhedon, Aug 12, 2005.

  1. christhedon

    christhedon
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    Hi,

    I just found out there is 1280 * 768 and 1920 * 1024 resolutions for HDTV.

    I couldn't find answers to these questions:

    1) Facts on what will be the standard in the future?
    2) Whether there will be DVDs with both resolutions or one of them?
    3) Whether better off getting SD, until the HD standard is a bit more clear?

    Can anyone take a stab at those questions?

    Cheers,

    Chris
     
  2. Stephen Neal

    Stephen Neal
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    Those are not resolutions used for broadcast HDTV - they are just resolutions that some displays run at.

    HDTV broadcasts are 1280x720, 1920x1080 (and a few other variants - 1440x1080 and 1280x1080 are also used in the US and Aus)

    The common thing is that HD is either 720line or 1080line based.

    Any non-720/non-1080 line displays will need to scale for display - or have black lines top and bottom (as one 768 based Philips display that isn't quite 16:9 does I believe?)
     
  3. christhedon

    christhedon
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    So it is:

    a) possible or b) likely, that HD DVD / and broadcasts will be in 1920?
     
  4. AML

    AML
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    I think each country will use a similar system but not exactly the same?

    For example in Japan we are using 1125i instead of 1080i. Theres no discernable difference in quality, thats just the "muse" system japan uses.
     
  5. Quickbeam

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    1080i = 1125i.

    1125 is the total number of lines in a 1080i signal but only 1080 lines are visible (the rest are used for blanking).

    A 525/60 signal has 480 visible lines, while 625/50 has 576 visible lines.

    When the total number of lines are considered, 720p becomes 750p.

    Isn't MUSE long since defunct?
     
  6. Stephen Neal

    Stephen Neal
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    AIUI MUSE is defunct - but not "long since". I think it was still in use on the BS (Broadcast Satellite?) systems until a year or two ago when digital transmission using MPEG2 took over fully?

    There is a bit of confusion in Japan between MUSE (the transmission system) and HiVision (the video standard). HiVision is 1125/60i video, MUSE was the analogue compression system used to get this into a reasonable broadcast channel bandwith. (In the old days the same system - PAL or NTSC - was used for both applications, these days there are modulation schemes, compression schemes and origination schemes, all of which can be different. COFDM DVB-T delivering MPEG2 sourced from 270Mbs 4:2:2 YCrCb, for example)

    As for 1125i=1080i - well it is now, but it wasn't always...

    AIUI the original 1125/60i HiVision system didn't use 1080 active lines, it was nearer 1035-1050.

    It was with the adoption of 1920x1080 image formats (a digital version of the 1125/60i HiVision format) that 1125i = 1080i. (In fact I think MUSE stayed with the lower figure?)

    This is why some of the very early US HDTV broadcasts, using early HiVision gear, had slightly black bars top and bottom, because they were shot 1035-1050i, but broadcast at 1080i...
     
  7. Caprylate

    Caprylate
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    First post here, but can someone clear this up. I've been thinking on getting the Samsung LE26R41BDX 26" Greenwich II LCD TV, why is the resolution 1366 x 768? If I got this TV, would I be watching down-scaled images? And therefore not the best quality for playing Xbox360 in 720P. The TV would be used just for gaming so it doesn't really bother me if it doesn't do normal broadcast TV perfectly. Also what is the chance the TV will be below £500 by Christmas?

    This TV looks exactly the same as the one from Play.com minus the DX at the end, is it just an older version of the TV? Is the DX a newer model that doesn't have tearing or something?

    And are there any HDTV's that are under 26" with HDMI, composite etc for low prices?
     
  8. Tony Hoyle

    Tony Hoyle
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    Most TVs are 1366x768.. it's the same ratio as 1280*720.

    On Video you really can't tell - it's only an upscale of 6%. On some panels you can set it not to upscale so you get true 1280*720 with black borders, which would probably be better for xbox/PC output.
     

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