Answered HDR and Nits

Discussion in 'General TV Discussions Forum' started by hype_male, Nov 9, 2018.

  1. hype_male

    hype_male
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    Now adays, there are too many tv words to give one a banging headache. Let me put a question to you guys and hopefully someone will give me an answer. As far as I know, a tv needs to have 10 bits panel and 1000 nits for really good HDR experience.

    Say budget doesn't allow one to buy a tv with 10 bits panel and 1000 nits, my question is then that, in terms of budget tv's, how many nits at least should a tv have for one to enjoy decent HDR. I have seventh with 200nits, 350 nits but don't know how good or bad hdr will be with 350 nits.

    My second question is that, does a tv need to have hdr to enjoy 4k. I mean would 4k without hdr still be a good experience. Can one get a tv without hdr.
     
  2. Best Answer:
    Post #2 by EndlessWaves, Nov 9, 2018 (1 points)
  3. EndlessWaves

    EndlessWaves
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    Best Answer
    That's a poor checklist for a good HDR experience.

    HDR is richer colours that couldn't be displayed before and higher contrast through brightening highlights.

    The key factor for the first is a wide gamut backlight to produce that extended colour range, having a 10-bit panel to reproduce all the shades within that extended range is theoretically superior but 4K pixels are so tiny that an 8-bit panel with dithering does just as good a job.

    The key factor of the second is the ability to display higher contrast - i.e. a capable local dimming system. There's no point in having a higher brightness if it can only be applied to great chunks of the screen and washes out everything around the highlight. Right now the limiting factor is generally the ability to apply higher brightness to real world scenes, not the peak brightness values.


    As to HDR vs. 4K. HDR is by far the more influential technology on picture quality in it's fuller implementations, but if you've got a big enough or close enough TV you'll get some benefit from 4K. You may also see some benefit from 4K if you watch broadcast or streaming sources where the Full HD broadcasts aren't up to blu-ray quality as many of them are offering their 4K streams in higher quality as well as higher resolution.
     

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