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HDMI vs S/PDIF

Discussion in 'TAG McLaren Audio Owners' Forum' started by Thunder, Mar 7, 2005.

  1. Thunder

    Thunder
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    I was just reading the AV tech section of Hifi News and in particular the review of the rather amusing Denon AVC- A1XV :) What was interesting was the audio performance comparison between the HDMI inputs and the S/PDIF. The jitter performance on the HDMI input seems to be substantialy inferior to the S/PDIF :confused: Is this just Denons poor implementation of HDMI v1.1 or is it a sign of things to come? Are we being sold a technically inferior jack of all trades digital connection method in order to obtain better copyright protection? :mad:
     
  2. Stevesky

    Stevesky
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    HDMI v1.1 can reliably reconstruct the clocks at the receiving end as there is a packet of information that frequently gets sent down that describes the variation in the source clock. Implementation issues are more likely to affect performance as the chip sets from (like) Silicon Image are fairly good and can compete with SPDIF.

    I see no reason (with a bit of jiggery pokery) that a sync link scheme could also be used to make source clock frequency = AVP master clock frequency, hence you can reliably clock the data to the DAC's using the AVP's internal master clocks.

    Main issue I have with HDMI is that if you lose video sync temporarily then you also normally loose the encrypted link, which in turns require the system to renegotiate the link. Link negotation isn't instant so this can result in audio being muted briefly. This happens when going between NTSC / PAL, changing video sources or on some machines when playing a CD.
     

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