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HDMI Specifications and what it Means?

silentshadow56

Novice Member
Hello All!

I've been recently trying to become a little more technical and knowledgeable about technology and I've noticed there is a lot of information that's readily available so long as you know how to decipher it and I'm hoping you lot wouldn't mind helping me decipher this specification on my HDMI cable I can't quite work out.

It simply says E156277-D and I've tried typing in several different variations on google but it hasn't been too helpful in my search thus far. I was able to decipher everything else (or at the very least understand what it represents) but again have been unable to get a straight answer on this.

I would really like to know exactly what it's supposed to tell me as much as I would like to know what it's telling me.

For example:

28AWG I learned is "American Wire Gauge" and is telling me the thickness of the cable

Thanks!
 

Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
'E156277-D' is the stock code of the raw cable used in the HDMI cable assembly (plug>cable>plug) you have - unless you know the manufacturer of the cable stock is can be tricky tracking down the spec of the cable.

Joe
 

Otto Pylot

Active Member
Yep. Cable labeling doesn't really tell you much other than the lot number, internal mfr number, wire gauge, etc. What the cable is capable of is anybody's guess. If it works for what you want, then it's fine. However, if you want something more than HD (1080i/p) then you need to get a cable that is certified for HDMI 2.0 which would be a Premium High Speed HDMI cable, with the QR label for authenticity. Anything beyond the 25' maximum length for a Premium cable then you should look to a hybrid fiber cable like the Ruipro4k. Those cables are active so they can not be certified by HDMI.org.

Cable descriptions and mfr claims are very misleading so you need to look at your needs, cable lengths, and installation to make an educated selection.
 

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