HDMI dvd to DVI TV

S

sideshow bill

Guest
I've got and old HD ready LCD TV which has DVI as input, I previously had a DVI dvd attached to it which worked fine. I recently upgraded my DVD to an HDMI one and bought a DVI to HDMI cable to attach it to the TV.

Alas the message I get on the TV when connected is 'Out of Range' which I think refers to the resolution of the input device.

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
 

Andy98765

Distinguished Member
It maybe that the TV does not like 1080i, you could try 720p, it should except that as a minimum assuming it is HD Ready. Just what DVD into What TV are you connecting up.
 
S

sideshow bill

Guest
I've got and old HD ready LCD TV which has DVI as input, I previously had a DVI dvd attached to it which worked fine. I recently upgraded my DVD to an HDMI one and bought a DVI to HDMI cable to attach it to the TV.

Alas the message I get on the TV when connected is 'Out of Range' which I think refers to the resolution of the input device.

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
It maybe that the TV does not like 1080i, you could try 720p, it should except that as a minimum assuming it is HD Ready. Just what DVD into What TV are you connecting up.
It's a JVC DVD to Hyundai TV, when I had the DVI DVD player the TV would accept either mode.
 

Andy98765

Distinguished Member
Out of range most likely means I can not see the DVD player.

What make and model cable did you buy?
 
S

sideshow bill

Guest
Andy, thanks for your help I've contacted Lektropacks and it looks as if it could be to do with the TV refresh rates, it expects a 60hz signal(being a computer input) but the UK standard is apparently 50hz:(
 

Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
Hello sideshow bill

Your 'TV' is definitely not 'HD Ready' if it cant cope with a 50Hz Input signal on its Digital Input.

Do you have any R1 Discs? If yes the player will automatically Output them at 60Hz; which will test the lack of support at 50Hz theory.

If the Player has any form of Video Up-conversion (scaling) - switch it off and only output standard definition 576p(50) and 480p(60) via HDMI; connect the Player to the TV on SCART to begin with so that you can at least see its Menus.

You may also find you have to manually set the player to Output on HDMI if the Player and TV are not handshaking properly through the DVI port.

Joe
 
S

sideshow bill

Guest
Hello sideshow bill

Your 'TV' is definitely not 'HD Ready' if it cant cope with a 50Hz Input signal on its Digital Input.

Do you have any R1 Discs? If yes the player will automatically Output them at 60Hz; which will test the lack of support at 50Hz theory.

If the Player has any form of Video Up-conversion (scaling) - switch it off and only output standard definition 576p(50) and 480p(60) via HDMI; connect the Player to the TV on SCART to begin with so that you can at least see its Menus.

You may also find you have to manually set the player to Output on HDMI if the Player and TV are not handshaking properly through the DVI port.

Joe
Joe, thanks for your response, I have used this TV to watch in HD mode using my old DVI DVD player, it appears that DVI to DVI is no problem as the standard for DVI is 60hz and I was allowed to upscale to 1080i & 720p.
I've been advised to contact the DVD manufacturer to ask if I can force it to output in PAL60, which I've got to admit means nothing to me.
Anyway I await the respose from JVC tech services with interest.

As an aside to this issue I've recently bought a XBOX(360) for my son and the same person who gave be the advise above assures me that it is possible
to force it to output in PAL60.....
Fingers crossed anyway, don't want my teenage son sulking on xmas day if he cant use his xbox in HD format.
Regards
 

Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
Hello sideshowbill

I think folk are getting confused between Analogue and Digital 'technology/terminology'.

DVI (video only) and HDMI (Video + Audio) Inputs and Outputs are capable of passing all manner of signals at both 50Hz and 60Hz - the only 'Limitation' being in the design of the Transmitter/Receiver chip that lies behind the DVI or HDMI socket.

When you purchase chips from IC manufacturers you have lots of options of what range of signals the chip will or wont work with - the less options the less costly the chip.

Lots of TV's that are more than capable of displaying an HD signal are knobbled to only work with certain signals due to the choice of chip that lies behind the DVI or HDMI socket on the TV.

With a Digital Output you don't get the option of 'PAL60' you either have the option of 50Hz, 60Hz or a 'forced' mode whereby all source signals are output at either 50Hz or 60Hz; though keep in mind this makes for rather uncomfortable viewing as motion looks very jerky when you force a 50Hz source signal to play back at 60Hz.

Best regards

Joe
 
S

sideshow bill

Guest
Hi Joe,

As most people use an external source for their audio eg an av receiver then in this case is it not true that the HD audio signal to the TV is superflous?

Or am I missing the point?

All so bloody confusing this, should have stuck with my Betamax VCR and Radio Rentals TV.:)
Regards..
 

Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
Hello sideshow bill

You'll be getting an AV Anorak soon enough :)

As the majority of 'consumer' TV's are equipped with Stereo speakers and HDMI 1.1 Spec Input sockets its handy to have Digital Video + Digital Stereo audio down a single cable if you like to use the TV speakers when watching the news or non 'surround' programmes from an external decoder (SKY HD or similar).

To achieve the same with a TV equipped with a DVI Input you usually have to run a DVI + a 3.5mm Stereo audio cable.

As you say the Stereo audio over HDMI is superfluous if you always plan to use your Surround Sound Receiver for listening no matter if its just the news your watching.

Joe
 

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