HDMI 2.1 Cable 5m

Adziadam

Active Member
Hi all,

I am looking for a cheap yet decent Ultra high-speed HDMI cable, now the specifications for 2.1 have only been tested on 3m cables so I was wondering if anyone knew a 5m cable that actually works. We are putting the cable through a wall so I want it to actually work. I don't want to be left in a puddle of tears when I put 120hz 4k on the tv and have to thread a new cable through.
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
As I understand it most of the Certified Ultra High Speed cables have been submitted for testing, but nothing has been certified yet. Lots of people making noise about theirs being UHS but no QR Codes or Holograms to date. Plus if it isnt certified, with a QR Code and Hologram HDMI Org have stated that you cant call it Ultra High Speed - period.

From HDMI.org

The specification does not indicate a cable length. Cable length depends on the cable manufacturer. It is likely the maximum lengths for passive cables will be approximately 2 to 3
meters.


So I think you are going to to be out of luck on a 5m Certified cable for the foreseeable future.
 
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Adziadam

Active Member
I guess Amazon marketplace has its own way of describing things :). I guess I should take a punt then and potentially just get one as I don't know how long it will take till the certification is released.
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
None of the cables on Amazon have been certified. Also note that due to the way HDMI 2.1 works compared to 2.0 that they are unlikely to work with the full 2.1 specification especially the 120Hz as that will require high frequency signalling (TMDS).
There is a reason why HDMI org have given likley cable lengths, they know what works and what doesnt work from extensive testing. I know that there are companies like RuiPro who are working on Hybrid Fibre 8K capable cables, but currently HDMI org does not have a certification program for non-passive cables

The specification permits wire, passive, active, and converter Category 3 cable assemblies. The initial Ultra High Speed HDMI Cable Certification Program covers wire and passive cables.

So I think that buying one of the 'Amazon un-certified UHS?' cables especially over 3m will result in the tears that you did not want. Better to put a duct in for now, so that you can replace it when 3m+ UHS cables become available.
 

Adziadam

Active Member
I just had a guy come round for the wall work to give me a quote so I best get a 2.0 cable for the meantime and thread another one through in the future.

Thank you
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
I just had a guy come round for the wall work to give me a quote so I best get a 2.0 cable for the meantime and thread another one through in the future.

Thank you
What is he giving you a quote for?

The recommendation that most would give out would be to put some trunking in to allow you to replace the cable as needed. The guy should be able to do this and if he can't get somebody else out to do so.

As @mushii states though new cable will likely be an active one of some description at 5m.
 

Adziadam

Active Member
It was a quote to drill a hole in the fireplace wall (chimney breast) tv is mounted above an electric fire and come out lower down on the side of the chimney breast.

He will also fit brush plates as well quote was £150 for 1 and half hours work that quote include a 2.0 hdmi cable but I would supply my own as I am sure the hdmi cable I would get would be cheaper.

Is this reasonable ?
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
Well, if I was doing it, it would take more than 1.5 hours. If I am understanding correctly his schedule of works should be something like:

Core walls to take 40mm flexible conduit
Chase 2 x 47mm metal back boxes in
Modify the back boxes to take a 40mm conduit
Fit the back boxes and make good damaged plaster work
Connect the 2 back boxes with 40mm flexible conduit
Feed HDMI cable through the conduit
Attach 2 x brush plates to each back box
Test cable

The chasing and the making good will take more than 1.5 hours. I also think £100 an hour is pretty steep.
 

Adziadam

Active Member
It was no chasing it was drill a hole behind tv and on the side wall below and feed the cables through and down about 2m as the void is empty and fit 2 brush plates nothing major like chasing.

Is that a bad deal then ?
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
It was no chasing it was drill a hole behind tv and on the side wall below and feed the cables through and down about 2m as the void is empty and fit 2 brush plates nothing major like chasing.

Is that a bad deal then ?
It does sound it :(.

To drill a hole wide enough for just a HDMI cable does not require any more specialised drill bits a normal SDS drill would do it a few minutes. Then fumble around in the chimney passing the cable through. Screw the brush plates directly to wall with no back boxes. £99 HDMI cable from Currys and job's a good one :)

I appreciate the guy has come out to give you a quote and will be travelling etc so it will have a minimum cost but what he is offering is not future proofing you in anyway.

Not sure how much of your heat from the fire goes up the chimney but would be a concern it does not melt the HDMI cable too.
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
As Chuck says he could bang 2 x 25mm (you will need 25mm for many HDMI plugs) holes in the wall, feed the HDMI through and screw 2x brush plate to the wall job done. 30 - 40 minutes work, not bad £300 an hour. Not how I would do it, but I guess its horses for courses. Make sure that he tapes the end caps on the cable when he feeds it through. Brick-dust ingress in HDMI cables is a pretty quick way to damage both the cable and the HDMI sockets on your very expensive HDMI 2.1 equipped devices

Oh and that electric fire, keep it WELL AWAY from your HDMI 2.1 cable as HDMI 2.1 is much more susceptible to RFI, and electric fires can radiate a lot of it, your fire could kill your cable, so watch how your man routes that cable.

Good luck with the work.
 

Adziadam

Active Member
I was trying to price the cost of the drill into this and I think the cheapest I could get is £50 and then the fishing rod set is around £10 not sure if a cheap SDS drill will be any good against 10cm of brick.

I was trying to get the cheapest option he did suggest that he could chase it instead but I guess that option would cost a lot more considering the chasing work and plastering over.

With the fireplace I guess can route the cable back as far as it can go but the fire sits outside the brickwork flat to the wall so I would hope that would provide some protection again the RFI but can only try and see in the future if I would ever swap out the cable.
 

Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
Ignore all mention of HDMI Version numbers on HDMI cables (2.1, 2.0, 1.4 etc) - for now a Premium High Speed or High Speed certified cable is as good as you can get with a passive copper cable.

At 5m you could, as others suggest, consider a Hybrid Fibre HDMI cable - RuiPro4k being our preferred choice on installs,

Conduit and a pull cord are always a great option if practical - I would also consider adding at least two solid core, non-CCA/CCS CAT6 cables to get the TV on your wired Network/give you options if you ever had to go with an HDMI over CAT solution.

Joe
 

Adziadam

Active Member
Thanks for all your help, I just installed an LG C9 tv (great picture) noticed that LG has stopped you from changing the power cable so this has put a bit of a downer on my plans. I guess I will need to take a plug off a single plug extension and do it that way instead now or a full wall chase will be required.
 
I totally agree with @Joe Fernand. 1.5" - 2.0" conduit where needed, pull strings, solid core CAT-6a (non-CCA/CCS and not preterminated CAT-6 ethernet) cable is the ONLY way to future proof your cabling. The solid core cable can be used to extend an ethernet connection with push down keystone jacks or extend an HDMI connection with HDBT.

Passive Premium High Speed HDMI cable can only be certified up to 25'. Active cables can not be certified, yet. A single cable, source to sink, with no wall plates, extenders, adapters, etc is the most realiable connection for 4k HDR. An active, hybrid fiber cable like what Joe mentioned (Ruipro4k) is what is recommended.
 

Adziadam

Active Member
I did some research but I believe it voids your warranty changing the power cable from the rear of the tv as you have to unscrew the access panel and its a proprietary connector. I guess the only way is a single socket extension cable because you can take the plug off the other end and pull the cable through that way. It isn't the end of the world so I should be able to make it work.

As for the CAT 6 do know any place that sell them cheap Otto? sounds daft but can this easily be picked up on Amazon, there can be fake ethernet cables as I have fallen victim to this in the past.
 
If you are referring to solid core CAT-6 cables, I purchased mine from Sewell in 50' spools.

Premium High Speed HDMI cables can be purchased from anyone who sell the cables as "Premium High Speed HDMI" and the cable comes with the QR label of authenticity (that you can scan). Certification is only allowed up to 25' for passive cables. Active cables cannot be certified. Keep in mind that the certification is not a 100% guarantee that the cable will work with all setups. There is more to a succesful cable run than just the data pipe (cable) but with certification at least you know the cable was tested and certified by HDMI.org. Monoprice, BJC, MediaBridge all sell Premium High Speed HDMI cables so you're not limited to any one reseller or mfr.
 

vw man

Active Member
any links to 3m HDMI 2.1 cable for dolby vision from Apple 4k TV to 4k old?
 

Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
You do begin to wonder if folk just like myself and others typing the same message over and over :)

HDMI version numbers are not relevant to HDMI cable certification or performance.

Ultra High Speed is the latest cable certification program from HDMI.org - expect cables to be very expensive, no longer than 3m and available some time later this year.

If purchasing new now look for a Premium High Speed or High Speed certified cable - at 3m there are many to choose from.

If you already have cables of a suitable length I would give those a go before you purchase anything new - there is a good chance they will be fine.

Joe

 
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any links to 3m HDMI 2.1 cable for dolby vision from Apple 4k TV to 4k old?
There aren't any "HDMI 2.1" cables. There will be Ultra High Speed HDMI cables, which will be passive and only probably up to 10' but nothing is certified yet. At 9' (3m) all you need for 4k HDR (Dolby Vision and HDR10) is a Premium High Speed HDMI cable (with QR label for authenticity). They are certified by HDMI.org to meet all HDMI 2.0 hardware specifications, which is all you need. I use them on my AppleTV 4k to watch 4k HDR content with zero issues.

I agree with you @Joe Fernand , it is getting tedious typing the same message over and over again.
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
Yep we must sound like broken records, let's try this

The first rule of HDMI club.

1) There is no HDMI cable version number...
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
Yep we must sound like broken records, let's try this

The first rule of HDMI club.

1) There is no HDMI cable version number...
Can We Get The Above Stickied Please - everyday feels like Groundhog Day !!!
 

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