Answered HDD failure

Discussion in 'Computer Software & Operating Systems' started by ss sulaco, Jul 1, 2015.

  1. ss sulaco

    ss sulaco
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    As title suggests my laptop has had a recent total hard drive failure.
    Does anyone know of someone who can recover such things as photos etc

    Any help much appreciated
     
  2. Best Answer:
    Post #4 by andy1249, Aug 10, 2015 (1 points)
  3. EndlessWaves

    EndlessWaves
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    What was the failure? If it was something major like a head crash then it can be pricey to recovery data as it requires opening up the drive in a clean room. Expect hundreds of pounds.

    I've never done it so I can't recommend anyone specific.
     
  4. 12harry

    12harry
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    Endless Waves, whilst yr reply is Correct, . . . . isn't there a chance the failure is due to something else... that a PC repairer could fix?
    If the MBR is destroyed the OS won't fire-up is my understanding, but someone with Repair skills may be able to repair /patch, so at least their photos / data may be recovered.

    Opening-up a HDD is very expensive as you suggested....in the past I used to buy HDD's as "pairs" so I had a "spare electronics" - as I understand this can be swapped if it's a chip-failure....so the HDD "recognised" the correct chips...

    Sadly this episode points to the PC / Laptop Manufacturer's unwillingness to supply goods "Fit for Purpose" - when a User starts to build-up a stack of Saves.... why doesn't the OS suggest buying an external HDD?
    It's not exactly rocket-science, although most PC-Users ( not those here! ) don't consider parts-Failure. WE know it's only a matter of Time . . . . and mostly, the least-convenient, at that.

    What I never understand is why when I "Save" something the Location of that Save is invisible - why can't Microsoft put up a box that gives the path and ideally the available space as well? This would alert one to having "Saved" to the wrong location.
    Furthermore I don't understand why a program cannot be "saved" in two locations.... at the same time - it needs only a small attachment to the file to give the addresses . . . . if one ( Drive ), is "missing" then a Box tells us, - so we can plug-in the appropriate external HDD.
    (( Of course the software writer would have to think that the external Drive could be the wrong one . . . but I suspect that would never occur to them...)).

    We've been suffering HDD Failure for 30 years . . . surely Microsoft knows how d- inconvenient this is.
     
  5. andy1249

    andy1249
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    Wow...if ever there was a proper use for the acronym PEBKAC this is it.

    Default save locations for pictures is "my pictures" for downloads its "my downloads" and so on.
    If you dont like those defaults the "save as" lets you choose exactly where to put them and default options for any content type can be changed to any location you like.
    The path is never invisible, it should be basic knowledge for every computer you own.

    Multiple save locations depends on your backup routine, if you dont have one then thats entirely your own fault, the importance of backups has been a standard element of every basic computer course since they came into existence.
    This is especially the case for laptops where there is usually only one drive, for business , your IT department takes care of things, for personal use, you should always have important content on another device and should have budgeted for that at the outset.
    Yes, it has always been known that hard drives are sensitive electro mechanical devices, which is exactly why people are always going on about the importance of backups.

    Im pretty sure the term "not fit for purpose" has never included whether or not the user can be bothered to learn basic computer best practices.

    For the OP, you could try something like this,
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bipra-SATA-...1439208711&sr=8-2&keywords=Usb+hard+drive+kit

    Basically, you remove the hard drive from your laptop, connect up the kit, then attach to another PC via USB and see if you can recover the data...this will work as long as the original problem was not inherent to the actual drive but rather a problem with either hardware or software on the laptop.
    If the problem is actually the drive, the data is gone for good.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2015
  6. 12harry

    12harry
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    I'm not aware of the acronym you quote but you seem to believe that the User should do all the work. For many folks they buy a PC and expect it to work faultlessly - whilst I agree there are "Default" places to save files, IMHO this is never satisfactory, since it fills-up space on the C-drive which may be needed by programs when they run out of RAM. Also, it leads to fragmentation and the gradual slowing of the PC.
    If Users save Videos on their PC the filling process will be accelerated.
    Many PC Users won't defragment - or be able to set-up a regular session to do this.... but the majority probably don't bother.

    Oh yes, I know that everyone should know how to overcome this - but why shouldn't we expect Microsoft to do some of the work?

    I don't think blaming the User is right.... Why can't we expect a PC ( Operating System / Program ) to help us? They provide endless "Help Files" many of which add to confusion, yet fundamentals appear to be overlooked. I gave the example of HDDs - IMHO it would not be unreasonable to expect the OS to offer to check the drives once a year - this could be by testing each location, or using one of the Accessories/Tools.... if the drive is developing faults ( i.e. more than last-time ) then the OS should suggest . . . .

    ...............................................................................................................................

    Perhaps you could be kind enough to explain to me how I should be "Saving" my movies?
    - I use a third HDD in the Desktop ( drive "K" ) and an external USB3 HDD ( drive "S" ) - but find I have to keep telling the PC the path ( as in "Save As" ) every time I want to save two copies.
    If I forget to save the second copy, the PC doesn't care and allows me to shut-down. I don't know how to check there are two Copies, so this omission goes undetected, possibly for years - OR - until one drive croaks and I want to view that movie.
    BTW.... The "S" drive is supposed to be kept in a "Safe" location, so it's often not present.

    Thankyou in advance.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2015
  7. ss sulaco

    ss sulaco
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    Sorry for all the heated debating as I started the thread!
    Heindsight is a wonderful thing when it Comes to the question " you did back everything up didn't you"?!
    Nope i never. Probably through lazyness but not through lack of basic computer skills.
    Anyway the hard drive was kaput but I did magage to save everything.
     
  8. andy1249

    andy1249
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    @12harry ,
    If you dont want media saved on the C drive or the default save locations for media on the C drive, these folders can be moved to any location you like.
    How to Move Windows 7 Personal Folders Like My Documents to Another Drive | Gizmo's Freeware

    Once you have your media location chosen and are happy with it, set up a backup. You can setup as many backups as you want to as many drives or network locations that you want.
    You then get all the warnings and notifications you require....
    See here...
    Set up or change automatic backup settings - Windows Help

    As said...microsoft do actually supply all the items in your wishlist.
    A quick google would have taken you straight to the procedures.

    Oh...and pretty much every hard drive manufacturer and motherboard manufacturer provide s.m.a.r.t. Tools for continuos monitoring of hard drives these days, its just a question of loading the utility and activating it.
     
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    Last edited: Aug 13, 2015
  9. MacrosTheBlack

    MacrosTheBlack
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    also @12harry. Whilst there is some small benefit to defragmenting a hard drive. NEVER defrag an SSD you will only be shortening the life of your solid state drive. Something to bare in mind. As for Windows and backups, Microsoft have included backing up prompts in their Action Centre notifications since Windows 7. The responsibility is the end users. Ignorance is not an excuse.
     
  10. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    PEBKAC = Problem Exists Between Keyboard And Chair :D

    Sorry but most of us live in the real world - just about nothing technical works flawlessly, especially when there is end user intervention. Not to mention we all like to do things differently, so Windows can't just know the way I prefer to do things.
    As andy1249 says you can move the location of all your personal folders such as My Documents and I have been doing this for years. It is even more relevant now with SSD's being smaller than the mechanical drives we all used in the past to boot from.

    I bet you could ask 100 different people what they consider the fundamentals to be and get near enough 100 different answers. Now try writing all of those into the software and see just how confusing it is then.

    Far too many people seem to expect Windows to do everything for them. But it isn't the idea, it is just the basic background user interface. To do specific tasks (such as backups, although as stated this is now included in Windows since Vista IIRC) you need to buy the right software for the job.
    Just before Windows 7 was released MS were almost made to stop including Internet Explorer as it was considered to be monopolising the browser market without ever being sold as a standalone product. But in the end we ended up with the Browser Choice icon being put on our desktop. So MS have to be careful how much they add into the OS.

    Mark.
     
  11. mentasm

    mentasm
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    When I bought all my new bits last November I thought I was being clever by moving everything profile related off of my SSD onto a standard Samsung HDD. Worked fine until the other day, when said HDD died spectacularly with little to no warning (Chrome started chugging as the cache file was also on D:, but then the drive just went). I've never had a drive die like that in all of the years I've been using and building PCs - it was totally gone. I couldn't get anything off of it when I plugged it into my docking station, and changing the controller for one from a drive with identical model/serial etc. numbers didn't help either. As a last resort I tried the old stick it in the fridge thing (which despite what people say, has worked for me in the past), but no joy. It was toast.

    Luckily I keep most of my stuff on other internal/external drives and really only lost my more recent profile stuff and game saves (which was still a pain), but it goes to show that these things can go unexpectedly after very little use. This drive was only just out of its warranty and hadn't actually seen much use at all. My older Samsung drives are still going strong, one of them at almost eight years old. The difference here is that this one was a Seagate manufactured Samsung....

    I was unusually zen about the whole thing. I'm sure there will come a day when I'm looking for a particular file and realise it was on that drive though...
     

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