HD228 bass issue

Martyn21

Standard Member
Hi all,

I just bought some HD228's and really happy with the clarity and sound. However the bass is not all that great and in some cases a little flappy but if I press them slighty tighter to my head the bass response is excellent.

Has anyone else had this issue?

Got em from amazon.

Cheers

Martyn
 

davejames

Active Member
Its perfectly normal that if you push headphones tighter on your head the bass increases, if the bass isnt quite to your liking then you might find that in time the pads soften, bringing the drivers slightly closer to your ears which would increase the bass, or it might be that they are just too new, burn them in for at least 50 hours & then have a listen, burn in is a debatable subject but with headphones they are a mechanical driver which may loosen up in time, I never believed in burn in until I got the DT880's, so try it, you have nothing to lose, you can put them in a draw playing music at normal levels, that way you know when you listen to them again after 50 hours or so if the burning in has had any effect rather than your ears simply adjusting to the sound.

What have you got them plugged into btw? as that could also be the cause of the poor bass, or it could simply be that your expectations were a little high for such a headphone.
 

Martyn21

Standard Member
Thanks for the reply.

I agree about running in. Ive always run in my hi fi speakers so will give it a try.

I'm using my iPhone with them.
 

Member 410254

Active Member
if you want bass bins then B&W P5's are pretty impressive. The HD228's have got better over time, I currently have a pair and was a little unimpressed to start with however with about 40~50 hours listening the bass response did increase.

The spec on the 228 is 18hz and the P5 is ~10hz.

Kind regards

Phil @ Custom Cable
 

davejames

Active Member
Only problem with going by specs is it doesnt mean much unless they quote the +/- dB, as a headphone can advertise 10hz - 30khz but it could be -20dB down at 10hz, in which the 10hz would be inaudible, although 10hz basically sounds like air movement anyway.
 

Drubbing

Active Member
Specs are meaningless - they don't tell you how a phone will sound, or how well they'll do it.

It's highly unlikely a human can hear as low as 10hz, and even 18Hz is on the cusp of possibility.

The reason why manufacturers quote these theoretical specs is because that is what the product may be capable of - with the right gear, and music, under controlled lab conditions as read by a machine.

And if they can put 10Hz on there people think - Wow, bassy.
 

Member 410254

Active Member
Specs are meaningless - they don't tell you how a phone will sound, or how well they'll do it.

It's highly unlikely a human can hear as low as 10hz, and even 18Hz is on the cusp of possibility.

The reason why manufacturers quote these theoretical specs is because that is what the product may be capable of - with the right gear, and music, under controlled lab conditions as read by a machine.

And if they can put 10Hz on there people think - Wow, bassy.

Could not agree more, a car may look good on the spec sheet but drive like custard!

Regards

Phil @ Custom Cable
 

westbam

Active Member
specs .... treat them as a very rough guide. What specs and graphs don't tell you is tonality. But at the end of the day, it's down to your ears.
 

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