HD-XE1 into HD1 fails on 1080p

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by charker, Jan 23, 2008.

  1. charker

    charker
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    Hi

    I have just acquired a cheap Tosh XE1 and have connected it up to my JVC-HD1. [email protected] works great except SD-DVD stutters.

    So I try 1080p and I get "no input", "wrong frquency" etc.

    I try 1080i and it works fine.

    If I recall HD1 has firmware 1.62 and Tosh has 2.7

    Any ideas why I can't feed it 1080p?

    Cliff
     
  2. Member 55145

    Member 55145
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    is the dvd pal or ntsc?

    is the player pal or ntsc?

    does the hd1/player support [email protected]/60hz? (i take it you are using HDMI for all)
     
  3. charker

    charker
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    The DVD is PAL and the player is UK (so PAL I guess)

    The player does not seem to let you specify 50/60 just "as good as 1080p"

    Yes, HDMI cable. Quite a long one though at 15m. Works for everything else (eg [email protected] for example).

    Cliff
     
  4. Ballistix999

    Ballistix999
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    Oooer. 1080p over 15 metre cable? You'll start to get signal drop-off soon after 10 metres. I ran my XE1 through the HD1 fine. Not sure if it was 24p though...coming to think of it does the HD1 accept 24p?

    T
     
  5. Avi

    Avi
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    Setting the player to 1080p/24 will cause judder with PAL DVD due to it being 25 frames. 1080p/24 is benefitial for "24 frame film" material that would otherwise be output at 60hz as it avoids 3:2 repeat.

    1080p/24 also requires less bandwidth than 1080p/50/60. I suspect the issue is your cable length in combination with the higher bandwidth signal. You either need a higher quality cable or a signal booster to avoid this type of issue on longer cable runs with HDMI.

    The HD1 accepts and properly processes 1080p/24 at a refersh of 96hz.

    AVI
     
  6. Member 14847

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    The HD1 is fine with pretty much any 1080 signal. Cable sounds like the most likely culprit. Try it with a shorter cable if possible and - if it works - you may need a better quality 15m cable.
     
  7. charker

    charker
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    [email protected] over 15m cable works faultlessly. Perhaps HD1 doesn't like [email protected]?

    Cliff
     
  8. charker

    charker
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    [email protected] works fine. I wondered why "as good as 1080p" (the XE1 output option) doesn't work when "as good as 1080i" does.

    I will try shorter cable.

    Must add the [email protected] looks fantastic, smooth pans, credits etc. Much better than my XBOX HD-DVD drive.

    Cliff
     
  9. Tony Hoyle

    Tony Hoyle
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    At 15 metres it may be better to have two 7m cables with a repeater. Probably cheaper than finding a cable that can reliably do 1080p over that distance.

    The HD1 does 1080p/60 just fine.. I've done it over a 10m Lindy cable from the PS3 (although most of the time I only do 1080p/24).
     
  10. NonPayingMember

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    1080p60 is twice the bandwidth of 1080p24. Best to check the cable.

    Repeaters can fall out, and make for difficult placement as halfway along the cable run is likely to be halfway up a wall or along a ceiling!! Just get a decent cable that works.
     
  11. bolts

    bolts
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  12. charker

    charker
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    Hi all

    It is the cable. Tried the one that came with the XE1 and it's fine. Now I have to spend even more money :eek:

    Cliff
     
  13. bolts

    bolts
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    I know how you feel but it will be worth it when it all works as it should do.

    :thumbsup:
     
  14. Tony Hoyle

    Tony Hoyle
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  15. Avi

    Avi
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    One of the issues with HDMI is that there is no guarantee that any cable works as often it depends on the device at either end. Because of this I would make sure I could return a "new cable" cable if it didn't work. £100 isn't bad if it is a high quality 15m HDMI cable.

    The cheaper cables usually work fine for short runs or sometimes longer runs if you don't push the bandwidth i.e. stick with 1080i or 1080p/24. Increase the bandwidth to 1080p/50/60 over longer runs and many cables fail.

    AVI
     
  16. hornydragon

    hornydragon
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    For 15m thats not expensive
     
  17. Member 55145

    Member 55145
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    as far as i knew all hdmi cables had to be screened to make sure they worked to spec. (one error per billion or something)

    my brother got a 10mt pro signal cable from cpc for around £12 works fine for 1080p from my ps3 to his tv and from his pc to his tv

    £100 for a 15m cable is disgusting quite frankly and you wouldnt catch me paying over £25 for it
     
  18. Avi

    Avi
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    From the HDMI org -

    Q. Does HDMI accommodate long cable lengths?
    Yes. HDMI technology has been designed to use standard copper cable construction at long lengths. In order to allow cable manufacturers to improve their products through the use of new technologies, HDMI specifies the required performance of a cable but does not specify a maximum cable length. We have seen cables pass "Standard Cable" HDMI compliance testing at lengths of up to a maximum of 10 meters without the use of a repeater. It is not only the cable that factors into how long a cable can successfully carry an HDMI signal, the receiver chip inside the TV or projector also plays a major factor. Receiver chips that include a feature called "cable equalization" are able to compensate for weaker signals thereby extending the potential length of any cable that is used with that device.

    With any long run of an HDMI cable, quality manufactured cables can play a significant role in successfully running HDMI over such longer distances.

    Q. How do I run HDMI cables longer than 10 meters?
    There are many HDMI Adopters working on HDMI solutions that extend a cable’s effective distance from the typical 10 meter range to much longer lengths. These companies manufacture a variety of solutions that include active cables (active electronics built into cables that boost and extend the cable’s signal), repeaters, amplifiers as well as CAT5/6 and fiber solutions.

    Q. How can I tell if a cable is an HDMI certified cable?
    All HDMI products are required to be certified by the manufacturer as part of the HDMI Compliance Test Specification. However, there may be instances where cables bearing the HDMI logo are available but have not been properly tested. HDMI Licensing, LLC actively investigates these instances to ensure that the HDMI trademark is properly used in the market. We recommend that consumers buy their cables from a reputable source and a company that is trusted.

    Q. What is the difference between a “Standard” HDMI cable and a “High-Speed” HDMI cable?
    Recently, HDMI Licensing, LLC announced that cables would be tested as Standard or High-Speed cables.

    Standard (or “category 1”) cables have been tested to perform at speeds of 75Mhz, which is the equivalent of a 1080i signal.
    High Speed (or “category 2”) cables have been tested to perform at speeds of 340Mhz, which is the highest bandwidth currently available over an HDMI cable and can successfully handle 1080p signals including those at increased color depths and/or increased refresh rates. High-Speed cables are also able to accommodate higher resolution displays, such as WQXGA cinema monitors (resolution of 2560 x 1600).

    http://www.hdmi.org/learningcenter/faq.aspx#44

    AVI
     
  19. sdb123

    sdb123
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    Well, it's alot more reasonable than a number of the 'high-end' manufacturers prices. Mark Grant cables represent excellent value for money....nobody is forcing you to buy one are they.

    :rolleyes:
     
  20. Dave777

    Dave777
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    I have a Mark Grant 10m one and works perfectly. Hidden away in ceiling with decent braid, worth evey penny. Spending £100 on a cable to feed £4k of projector seems reasonable to me! And I do know they are cheaper now!!!

    Dave
     

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