HD surround - dipoles / bipoles or "monopole" regular bookshelfs?

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Speakers' started by RoughRider, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. RoughRider

    RoughRider
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    Is there a "correct" or "intended" surround speaker-type for the modern surround mixes? I plan on spending what is to me quite a lot of money on 6 or 7 new speakers, I would like to know the theory while I'm looking.

    I ask because I remember for pro-logic (4.0 matrixed) the "surround" channel was intended to be enveloping, not directional, and I think this was the origin of the bipole and dipole. I think THX may have had somethign to say about a choice between the two, I know I have read about it on these forums. This carried through, I believe, into 5.1.

    But today I somehow feel modern (typified by HD) 5.1 and 7.1 mixes make use of all speaker locations, seeking a much less "diffuse" effect. This is what I want to get the best out of.

    I am also debating an appropriate balance of expenditure which I think is roughly on the same topic, because typically buying 4 good bookshelfs as surrounds could cost 45% of the total, whereas I would think listeningwise it is better as say 25% centre 50% mains 25% surrounds? I ignore sub as I'm SVS'd up so no upgrading required.

    I hope this is an interesting thread or at least informative, I am always grateful for the advice readily forthcoming from the contributing forum members, thank you.
     
  2. RoughRider

    RoughRider
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    [rather indiscreet bump] what about the KEF XQ's e.g. 50/30/30/10/10/10/10? Verrry pretty (I like piano black), very expensive (£750 for a centre is expensive to me), seemingly rarely owned by forumites? And they are "directional" rather than dipoles.

    Or B&W 683 / HTM61 / DS3, I know I would see significant upgrade to centre (CC6) and surrounds (ancient Canon S-35) but not a huge step up from mains (603 S2's) yet I would laying down 900 notes for them in order to keep my voice-matching. Of course, the 603's could take on surround back duty and save me a few quid on the second dipoles...
     
  3. DolbyDan

    DolbyDan
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    If you have a big room I would def go with bipoles/dipoles.
    Monitor Audio Gold Range do very impressive bipoler speakers!
     
  4. RoughRider

    RoughRider
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    Cheers Mendd3. In reading around I also found talk about some M&K's called S 55 which are tripole but the owners still found the sound perfectly "directional" in as much as they weren't losing out on the special effects steering, so I sort of answered my own question. Time to book a couple of demo's, I think :) OT - I know, I am pretty much talking to myself here, well I'm excited about getting some new toys, and I just added a signature and I wanted to test it works
     
  5. Mark.Yudkin

    Mark.Yudkin
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    Original THX (7.1) spec: Direct for rear, dipole for surround. Since not everybody like the dipolar sound, this part of the spec was later weakened, and many prefer bipolar. My surrounds are direct.

    AFAIK, the M&K "tripoles" have all speakers in phases (or can be so configured), unlike some others which couple a bipolar treble and a direct bass.

    Dipolar rears typically sound awful - or worse - but YMMV.
     

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