HD ready - maybe not?

Douzeper

Standard Member
Recently in local store, I asked about HD, according to the salesman the software that sky will be using for their HD will only work on some televisions.

He recommended only one that would work with Sky HD (cant remember the make).

Any truth in this??
 

Scapegoat

Well-known Member
Douzeper said:
Recently in local store, I asked about HD, according to the salesman the software that sky will be using for their HD will only work on some televisions.

He recommended only one that would work with Sky HD (cant remember the make).

Any truth in this??
Cannot give any definitive answers, but I would say that it is almost certainly NOT true. Yes Sky HD will only work with some TVs i.e. High definition displays, but that is nothing to do with Sky software.
 
B

Billyfergus

Guest
Douzeper said:
Recently in local store, I asked about HD, according to the salesman the software that sky will be using for their HD will only work on some televisions.

He recommended only one that would work with Sky HD (cant remember the make).

Any truth in this??
Is there any chance the the particular brand that he said it would only work on the brand that his shop sold?
 

gavan

Well-known Member
Douzeper said:
Recently in local store, I asked about HD, according to the salesman the software that sky will be using for their HD will only work on some televisions.

He recommended only one that would work with Sky HD (cant remember the make).

Any truth in this??
Initially, Sky said you'd need HDMI to view Sky HD. Many existing panels with enough resolution don't have this input (just 'component video', so quite a few people were annoyed. Then they said that the _first generation_ of HD box will sport component outputs too, but that it's possible that content providers would turn them off for certain material.

Basically, don't get a 'Hi Def' telly unless it has HDMI connectivity. Even if the first generation box supports component, quite a lot of programmes might not play and future HD products will almost certainly mandate HDMI.


Gav

Gav
 

Knyght_byte

Well-known Member
im glad my HD PJ gets a better picture from component from my DVD player...heh, that way when i do get Sky HD i can use the HDMI input.....lol

no need to buy switchers....

i would imagine you could use a display with DVI input providing its HDCP or whatever it is....
 

xbox-guru

Standard Member
gavan said:
Initially, Sky said you'd need HDMI to view Sky HD. Many existing panels with enough resolution don't have this input (just 'component video', so quite a few people were annoyed. Then they said that the _first generation_ of HD box will sport component outputs too, but that it's possible that content providers would turn them off for certain material.

Basically, don't get a 'Hi Def' telly unless it has HDMI connectivity. Even if the first generation box supports component, quite a lot of programmes might not play and future HD products will almost certainly mandate HDMI.


Gav

Gav
It's not so much the HDMI/DVI connectivity - it's specifically to do with HDCP.

Although some TVs have DVI, they will not be able to benefit directly from the HDMI output of the SkyHD box because the HDCP check will fail.

Rule of thumb - look for the 'HD Ready' logo (or check the specs for HDCP over DVI) and you'll be safe.

Xbox-Guru
 

gavan

Well-known Member
xbox-guru said:
It's not so much the HDMI/DVI connectivity - it's specifically to do with HDCP.

Although some TVs have DVI, they will not be able to benefit directly from the HDMI output of the SkyHD box because the HDCP check will fail.

Rule of thumb - look for the 'HD Ready' logo (or check the specs for HDCP over DVI) and you'll be safe.

Xbox-Guru
HDMI is a superset of DVI which includes HDCP as part of the spec.

Whereas DVI with HDCP _should_ work, HDMI is the only one 'guaranteed' to work. Of course, there are bound to be problems as with any new technology.


Gav
 

hornydragon

Well-known Member
If looking for a telly for Sky HD make sure it meets the EICTA "HD ready" specs and you should be fine.......

Doesnt mean sky wont broadcast a whole load of Crap in HD tho.........
 

xbox-guru

Standard Member
gavan said:
HDMI is a superset of DVI which includes HDCP as part of the spec.

Whereas DVI with HDCP _should_ work, HDMI is the only one 'guaranteed' to work. Of course, there are bound to be problems as with any new technology.


Gav
Sky are pushing the whole 'HD Ready' specification: the hardware is being developed so anything with this on the box is guaranteed to work..

There should be no difference to the end user if they have HDMI or DVI (with HDCP) on their HD Ready TV.

If it's something you really want a definitive answer on, let me know.

Xbox-Guru
 

gavan

Well-known Member
xbox-guru said:
Sky are pushing the whole 'HD Ready' specification: the hardware is being developed so anything with this on the box is guaranteed to work..

There should be no difference to the end user if they have HDMI or DVI (with HDCP) on their HD Ready TV.

Xbox-Guru
Sky aren't the only ones who will be making Hi Def devices - there's the matter of making sure that the gear will work with Blu-ray/HD-DVD players too, when they become available.

AFAIK HDMI is mandated for those devices. DVI with HCDP might work, but only HDMI is guaranteed to work.


Gav
 

xbox-guru

Standard Member
DVI (with HDCP) is exactly the same as HDMI, less the audio. Since there are no converters needed between the two (save a different connector), this would support the case.

EDIT: I checked on HDMI's homepage and HDCP is not native to HDMI. It can be used in conjunction with HDMI, but it certainly doesn't indicate it's part of the spec. Without a doubt, HDMI is far superior though!

Therefore, something designed to work with HDMI output will work flawlessly with DVI (with HDCP) in.

As I said before, at least in Sky's case anything carrying the 'HD Ready' Logo will be 100% compatible with their HD Box. I would suggest that other UK/Euro HD-broadcast suppliers will be taking the same stance.

I had the privilege of attending a conference with the director of technology for SkyHD a little while ago, who fully supported this.

This is worth a read regarding 'HD Ready', although judging by your knowledge you already know this!!!:

http://www.digitalspy.co.uk/article/ds18570.html

Martin
 
D

DaveP

Guest
Before anybody parts with their hard earned cash I suggest they learn the defininition of "HD Ready" and see if their intended purchase actually complies with it.

I had a mailshot yesterday that was offering a 42" plasma for £1199 and that said it was HD Ready. The spec of the screen said it had a resolution of 852 x 480. That is definitely not HD Ready in my opinion.

Dave
 

xbox-guru

Standard Member
DaveP said:
Before anybody parts with their hard earned cash I suggest they learn the defininition of "HD Ready" and see if their intended purchase actually complies with it.

I had a mailshot yesterday that was offering a 42" plasma for £1199 and that said it was HD Ready. The spec of the screen said it had a resolution of 852 x 480. That is definitely not HD Ready in my opinion.

Dave
I've seen a fair few of these too!

According to the HD Ready specs, it's not:

Requirements for the label “HD ready”
A display device has to cover the following requirements to be awarded the label “HD ready”:

1. Display, display engine

· The minimum native resolution of the display (e.g. LCD, PDP) or display
engine (e.g. DLP) is 720 physical lines in wide aspect ratio.


2. Video Interfaces

· The display device accepts HD input via:
o Analogue YPbPr*, and
o DVI or HDMI

· HD capable inputs accept the following HD video formats:
o 1280x720 @ 50 and 60Hz progressive (“720p”), and
o 1920x1080 @ 50 and 60Hz interlaced (“1080i”)

· The DVI or HDMI input supports content protection (HDCP)

* “HD ready” display devices support analogue YPbPr (component) as a HD input format to allow full compatibility with today's HD video sources in the market. Support of the YPbPr signal should be through common industry standard connectors directly on the “HD ready” display device or through an adaptor easily accessible to the consumer.
 

Mep

Well-known Member
no, it could be HD compatible, i.e. capable of scaling the feed to fits the screens owm resolution but it's definitely not HD ready....I think a lot of poor joe publics who aren't into this sort of thing will be misled...............not to say a std def screen with HDMI/HDCP won't give good results but its still not HD
 

xbox-guru

Standard Member
mep said:
no, it could be HD compatible, i.e. capable of scaling the feed to fits the screens owm resolution but it's definitely not HD ready....I think a lot of poor joe publics who aren't into this sort of thing will be misled...............not to say a std def screen with HDMI/HDCP won't give good results but its still not HD
This seems to be an all too common occurance.

I was in an electrical outlet (a shop, not a plug!!) recently where I asked about a TV I was looking at. The assistant told me it was HD compatible. I replied "maybe, but it's not HD ready". He looked at me for a couple of seconds with a knowing look. It seems that many people may also be fooled into buying something they *thought* was HD Ready when in fact it was nowhere near. The truth is a lot of stores have older TVs without the HD Ready specification and are trying their best to shift them to the unsuspecting public...
 

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