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HCPC vrs anything can compete?

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by redbull, Oct 5, 2001.

  1. redbull

    redbull
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    I posted a message on the
    HCPC forum, but still no reply. I am 99% sure this is the most cos effective way to acheive high res, smooth pics on a high quality CRT. I am still interested in hearing about other DVD/Scaler options to compare.

    I am on a really low budget so the HCPC will give me a lot of quality for the money.

    Anyone with any thoughts?

    Don't forget that I'm NICK BULL if on the forum from work!
     
  2. Jeff

    Jeff
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    HTPC is the most cost effective way to get the best out of ANY projector. In fact I would go as far as saying that a good scaler such as a HTPC is even more important with digital projectors. CRTs lack the sharpness of most digital projectors and are more forgiving. With CRTs you can get good results just by line doubling/tripleing/quadrupleing. With digital projectors you need to scale to the projectors native resolution.

    Jeff
     
  3. Stuart Wright

    Stuart Wright
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    Just want to comment on Jeff's 'lack of sharpness' statement.
    Yes LCDs are generally sharper than CRTs, but the softness in a CRT is a good thing.
    Next time you go to the cinema, check out the sharpness. You'll be amazed how soft the picture is. Unless you're at a DLP equipped cinema.
    Some softness is a good thing.
    In fact if set too sharp, an LCD can actually produce a somewhat taxing picture.
     
  4. redbull

    redbull
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    I thought the CRT image was quite crisp, and very 'filmic'. The thing that impressed me most with the CRT was the contrast, blacks were so black that even slight movements in the shadows of DARK CITY and BLADE RUNNER (not a good disc, even R1) were visible. Very impressive.

    Really it's all down to taste and a lot of other factors, I think a well scaled CRT image looked, to me, as good as film. I got over the 7 foot image size after the first 20 mins and the demo lasted 3 hours, so I had plent of time to asses the picture. This is somethinf you MUST have in kind when looking at PJ's, the initial thrill of the 6 or 7 foot screen may be a big WOW and would have same effect on mates etc, but the PJ is for you to live with, will invariably cost into the thousands and it's a lot of money if you don't really think about how you might live with it.
    If it isn't right for you, keep auditioning, if space and practiaclity are an issue then get the best one that suits all your needs, but at the end of the day it is the image that counts for everything, that is the goal, the best image within the parameters we are/have set for us, so don't settle for anything that you couldn't live with, but don't get something you physically couldn't live with either!!!!
     
  5. Jeff

    Jeff
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    The low res nature of DVD is helped by CRT, I would descibe CRT as lush, almost liquid. If you are going to use a projector as a true multimedia display then digital is probably the way to go. However while virtually any CRT projector once setup correctly will give you a good picture the same can't be said with digital projectors. Picking the right one for far more dificult.

    Jeff
     
  6. cg999

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    I thought this thread was about the benifits or otherwise of using HCPC.
     
  7. Gordon @ Convergent AV

    Gordon @ Convergent AV
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    Well, I sell video processors and not PC's. For superb picture quality when coupled with a CRT and for minimal outlay I believe an HTPC is a great solution. Providing you are PC literate, an enthusiast and no-one else wants to use it. The results with one of these things speak for themselves. You can't get a DVD player and scaler for the amount it costs to build one of these.

    Regarding sharpness of CRT v LCD and comparisons with cinema picture. The pixel structure of a fixed panel projector gives it a false form of edge enhancment making the images look sharp. As long as you don't try to display images above their native resolution then you're fine above that though and you've problems.

    Russ Herschelmann was a guest over at AVS a week ago and in his thread he mentioned something intersting about cinema image v DLP and projection. He saw Pod race scene at the main theatre over at SkyWalker Ranch. This was on an E-Cinema DLP unit. He was staggered at how a relatively low res device (compared to a movie projector I think it was less than half the resolution) could produce such a sharp image. The answer from the tech guys at SkyWalker was that because the film itself never fits in the gate in exactly the same place as it passes the projection lens (there is some play on the locating cogs I guess)the judder and shaking of the resulting image reduces the percievable resolution considerably to the point where the low res E-Cinema DLP's can compete.

    I found that quite intersting.

    Anyway, off to work. Hi Ho Hi Ho it's.....


    Gordon
     
  8. Chris Frost

    Chris Frost
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    [Keeping to the thread] HTPC is definately the most cost effective route.

    but slightly off topic:-
     
  9. RichardA

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    Staying off topic slightly! Star Wars 2 is being shot entirley on digital - it is already well into shooting and is due to be released 2002 (?) - although it is being shot entirely in Digital it will be released on celluloid and digital.

    Star Wars 3 (probably aimed for release in 2004)will be only released as a digital version (reportedly).

    On the digital cinema front it might be interestingto note that "Mike Bassett - England Manager" was shot entirely on HD Digital !

    On the original thread however I am obviously a little biased towards the hardware solutions rather than PC - BUT on a bang-for-buck rating a £1000 HTPC should give a better picture for most projectors than a £1000 scaler.

    On the sharpness debate - there is a big difference between softness and smoothness - A CRT projector, correctly installed and setup is not soft (i.e. out of focus) it's smooth (i.e. no pixelation)
    An LCD projector appears 'sharp' but you are actually seeing the separation of pixels not picture detail - DLP can appear 'softer' than LCD because the gaps between pixels are smaller. As Spectre has said, an over 'sharp' image becomes taxing to watch of longer periods - the sharp pixel edges force the eye to try to maintain an accurate focus, which causes strain.

    As an aside, it is a known trick that injecting low level noise into a image creates apparent sharpness whle hiding a multitude of sins!

    Hope this adds to the debate.

    Richard Ansell
    Snell & Wilcox

    [ 06-10-2001: Message edited by: Richard Ansell ]
     

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