Have you been stopped by the police while out?

mikeysthoughts

Well-known Member
Yes, I have this in mind. Also, my wife works as a carer, so this is an issue.
Am still not 100% sure what to do :( :(
I absolutely wouldn't advocate going out on a 100 mile round trip during lockdown. However today I've seen hundreds of people milling around, even those in high risk categories just going about their business as if there were no restrictions.

Going by Germany's recent rise in R0, I'm expecting a rise in infections within a couple of weeks so if you are going to do it, time is a factor.
 

Ste7en

Distinguished Member
See, I would class this as 'essential travel'. If you can drive 100 miles to take your dog for a walk in a forest I think this is a much more deserving trip.

Whatever you do, do it before Wednesday as it'll be like trying to go anywhere on a Bank Holiday.
 

ufo550

Well-known Member
Yes, I have this in mind. Also, my wife works as a carer, so this is an issue.
Am still not 100% sure what to do :( :(
If your wife’s a carer, that makes it more difficult.

I knew of a guy that was working abroad, his work dried up cos of the virus etc. Told his misses, he was coming home to uk. She told him, she wasn’t gonna allow him home. She had daughter & grand daughter staying, and he would have to self isolate for 14, before he was allowed home.

What if as suggested, your daughter had a test before she came home?
 

Ruperts slippers

Distinguished Member
His wife is a carer.
On the one hand his wife is a carer.
On the other the daughter is away and is distressed and anxious.
She could have a test, self isolate or just go back home. Any decisions like this come with a level of risk.

I'd go pick her up immediately.
 

ufo550

Well-known Member
On the one hand his wife is a carer.
On the other the daughter is away and is distressed and anxious.
She could have a test, self isolate or just go back home. Any decisions like this come with a level of risk.

I'd go pick her up immediately.
I can understand @davidjohnson concern for his daughter, but she is with her boyfriend currently. She's concerned that his family aren't following guidance. However, her coming back into family household is not following guidance, specifically as his wife is a carer. If she was to pass something onto Mum, that could prove fatal to others in Mums care; those persons shouldn't be dismissed as just a level of risk.

I don't think it helps in a difficult situation, by being bombastic and saying go get her etc. There are other people to be concerned about here.

I think my idea of a test, is an avenue to research, but it might not be as simple as that.
 

Ruperts slippers

Distinguished Member
I can understand @davidjohnson concern for his daughter, but she is with her boyfriend currently. She's concerned that his family aren't following guidance. However, her coming back into family household is not following guidance, specifically as his wife is a carer. If she was to pass something onto Mum, that could prove fatal to others in Mums care; those persons shouldn't be dismissed as just a level of risk.

I don't think it helps in a difficult situation, by being bombastic and saying go get her etc. There are other people to be concerned about here.

I think my idea of a test, is an avenue to research, but it might not be as simple as that.
No one said there would be an easy answer.
We currently have someone here with us due to domestic violence.
We discussed the risk and decided the mother and child could stay with us.
Government advice is after all a guideline. We disagreed before and I still think you were wrong. I think you're wrong here too.
I'm not being bombastic just assertive.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
I think my idea of a test, is an avenue to research, but it might not be as simple as that.
Another option/compromise would be to bring her home and then get her mother tested over the next "x" days, as she is more likely (fingers crossed) to have access to testing.
 

ufo550

Well-known Member
Another option/compromise would be to bring her home and then get her mother tested over the next "x" days, as she is more likely (fingers crossed) to have access to testing.
I'm not sure how this testing regime works. I've just been tested, as I'm a key worker now in a care home. However, that only covers me for the then and now. In a weeks time, the test might be or will be worthless. I'm trying to isolate myself as much as possible, wouldn't want to pass the virus onto residents etc.
 

ufo550

Well-known Member
No one said there would be an easy answer.
We currently have someone here with us due to domestic violence.
We discussed the risk and decided the mother and child could stay with us.
Government advice is after all a guideline. We disagreed before and I still think you were wrong. I think you're wrong here too.
I'm not being bombastic just assertive.
I try not to hold grudges, forums are about discussions & opinions. I don't post here to annoy people. Well done for helping someone in need, by the way.

But the current guidance is not to mix households, so saying just go pick her up ***, doesn't give constructive help. Just my opinion.
 

ufo550

Well-known Member
Edit; I suppose another option for David, is go pick up daughter (won’t debate the essential travel thing), then his whole household self isolates for 14 days, them if mum is asymptomatic, have test and if proves negative and return to work.
 

davidjohnson

Distinguished Member
Thank you everyone for your thoughts on this :)
The discussions above are very similar to the arguments I have been having with myself.
1: Collect her, make sure she is safe and enjoy her company (she is due to move away permanently in September)
2: Follow the guidelines (as we have been very strictly doing) and wait until things change.

Thank you also for the compromise suggestions involving isolation and testing, I have much to ponder
:confused:
 

WeeScottishLass

Well-known Member
Thank you everyone for your thoughts on this :)
The discussions above are very similar to the arguments I have been having with myself.
1: Collect her, make sure she is safe and enjoy her company (she is due to move away permanently in September)
2: Follow the guidelines (as we have been very strictly doing) and wait until things change.

Thank you also for the compromise suggestions involving isolation and testing, I have much to ponder
:confused:
I hope you come to a decision you feel comfortable with soon- you certainly have been given lots of decent advice to consider from the guys on here 😊
 

Ruperts slippers

Distinguished Member
Thank you everyone for your thoughts on this :)
The discussions above are very similar to the arguments I have been having with myself.
1: Collect her, make sure she is safe and enjoy her company (she is due to move away permanently in September)
2: Follow the guidelines (as we have been very strictly doing) and wait until things change.

Thank you also for the compromise suggestions involving isolation and testing, I have much to ponder
:confused:
I suppose I'm a rash person, quite impatient, who makes decisions quickly. Long negotiations were had with the ex wife over my children and she eventually released them.
However, we're not all the same, I wish you luck.
 
Yes, I have this in mind. Also, my wife works as a carer, so this is an issue.
Am still not 100% sure what to do :( :(
I would pick her up no shadow of doubt. I would have done even before the new stay alert level. She is your daughter after all. And yes it will mean you both have to isolate from your wife, but to me it would be worth it and I wouldn’t even question it. Regardless of the distance.

Ps. I’ve got a bag packed ready by the door to cross the borders of three countries outside the U.K. ;)
 
Last edited:

Stuart Wright

AVForums Founder
Staff member
100% pick her up. Provided she wants to return home, of course. Is she 18 already? If she is, as an adult, it's her choice. But then even if she is under 18, trying to make a daughter do something she doesn't want to do is very hard!
If she's anxious and her boyfriend's family are putting her at risk, it's a no brainer.
There is a risk with most things, these days, outside of the house.
Personally, I would take the risk of being infected myself to keep her safe. I would assume the same applies to your other family members at home.

Then there is the personal issue of being able to see her before she goes to Uni in September. Which I think should happen, by the way. Young people have such a low chance of dying from it, that provided they social distance from older people, I don't see a problem with them going to Uni. I hope my son goes.
But assuming she goes, you won't then see her for months, so make the most of it now.
Go get her ASAP is my advice.
 

Tight Git

Distinguished Member
For those who can remember, I'm afraid this all started with the miners' strike back in 1984.

Up until that time, if you placed one finger on a policeman, you were arrested for assault.

Then we had scenes on TV news each evening of lines of strikers pushing policemen and, instead of arresting them, the police pushed back.

Talk about the start of a slippery slope!
 

Autopilot

Distinguished Member
For those who can remember, I'm afraid this all started with the miners' strike back in 1984.

Up until that time, if you placed one finger on a policeman, you were arrested for assault.

Then we had scenes on TV news each evening of lines of strikers pushing policemen and, instead of arresting them, the police pushed back.

Talk about the start of a slippery slope!
I disagree, don’t confuse public order situations with everyday policing. Some will get arrested, actually many did on the minors strike, there is no way you can arrest every person in a large scale disorder.
 

Ste7en

Distinguished Member
Miners' Strike was completely different. Livelihoods were being destroyed. This is people just being pricks.

I know what you mean about assaulting a Police Officer though.
 

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