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Hard disk for video capture/editing

Dr.Rock

Active Member
I've just built myself a new PC which I'll be using for video capture, editing, etc. It's a 3.2 GHz Intel CPU with 160 Gb S-ATA hard disk and 1 Gb of DDR-400 RAM.

The hard disk obviously has my Windows XP Professional operating system and video editing software running. With this setup, should I capture to the same hard-disk or is it advisable to get a second hard-disk and capture to that? I anticipate that in the long run, it's advisable to do it in a second hard disk, so the system drive doesn't get contantly trashed about with all those read/writes. But for now (until I get the second HD), will I get frame dropouts or reduced performance in my video captures if I use the same system drive? I just wondered that if the drive is already concentrating on running the OS and video software, will it be too much task for it to handle a video capture at the same time?

Is an IDE hard disk as reliable as a S-ATA for video captures without frame dropouts?

Thanks.
 
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Antoeknee

Guest
Wisdom seems to be seperate HD for capture. I've recently reconfigured my machine for video editing and added a third drive (other 2 are in RAID array for OS and progs). This drive is just an EIDE running at ATA100 and after capturing some 5 hours of video I've not had a single frame dropped.
 

Dr.Rock

Active Member
Thanks Antoeknee,

About your two RAID drives. My motherboard has RAID capabilities but I haven't enabled it. What is the advantage of RAID? And do the two RAID'ed hard disks need to be identical?

Thanks.
 
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Antoeknee

Guest
Depends in which mode you have RAID set up. Usually the RAID in motherboards is a bit limited and may only allow Mode 0 or 1

Mode 0 or stripe this is where the data is written in turn to the drives in the array. This gives great speed but no fault tolerance, an error on any disk makes the whole array faulty and it would need to be rebuilt. So not ideal for critical data.

Mode 1 or mirror is the oposite of Mode 0 normally a copy of the data is written to a second drive so if one drive fails you've always got a copy.

There are Modes 3 and 5 where parity data is saved to a drive or across all the drives in the array.

A quick Google will yeild lots of info on RAID.

Its considered best if 2 identical drives are used.
 

MarkE19

Moderator
In an ideal NLE PC you would have a dedicated HDD that only has the captured/edited video on it.
In the real world where nothing is ideal you can normally get away with useing a single drive. It will just need to be maintained a bit more. Keep it well defragmented and make sure there is always plenty of space. Stop ALL background progs such as anti virus and screen savers.
Modern, powerful PC's can cope well with the demands of NLE. A few years ago this was not the case and dropped frames, even when doing everything correctly, were still fairly common. Other than the dedicated video HDD you seem to have done everything correctly, the 1Gb of RAM is a great advantage.

Good luck,
Mark.
 

owenw

Standard Member
IMO you'd have been better off buying a small cheap IDE hard drive (say 40 - 60Gb) for the system drive and use the S-ATA drive for more intensive video storage. The OS and applications won't benefit a great deal from the S-ATA drive TBH, especially with the amount of RAM in your system.

Bear in mind the drive used for video capture will be getting a lot of wear and tear moving all those gigs of data around increasing the chance of drive failure at some point.

If the worst should happen at least if it only has temporary video stored on it for editing which can always be recaptured. Better than facing a full system reinstall...
 
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Antoeknee

Guest
If you fancy doing what Owenw suggests, which I agree with, then when you buy the EIDE drive you could use something like Norton Ghost to clone the existing drive (SATA) to the new drive. then make the new drive the system drive.

Some hard drives come with backup software or can be downloaded from manufacturers web site.
 
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