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Hand in notice after furlough?

Ste7en

Distinguished Member
Has anyone handed in their notice after being put on furlough?

My Daughter was taken off furlough over a month ago and she has still not received a shift on her workplace rota. Her last 'proper' shift was last year, just before Christmas. This year she has had one shift (pre-COVID) because she covered for someone. She had turned 18 then. But they still paid her minimum wage for under 18. "We'll sort it out" is all she ever hears, but nothing is resolved.

Even when things were 'normal' she got one shift every two weeks (the rotas cover a fortnight).

I asked what was in her contract. Her reply "I've never received a contract or signed anything".

She has had enough and wants to leave now.
 
D

Deleted member 498601

Guest
Agree with the two posts above. IMO some organisations take the proverbial with young people, as in a lot of cases they are perhaps unaware of their rights within employment law or processes. It really is a case of ‘the squeaky wheel gets the grease’. If people make a fuss, that get listened to, but (to mix my metaphors) younger people don’t want to rock the boat.
Your daughter is clearly not being looked after and is well within her rights to simply leave with zero notice served.
 

Ste7en

Distinguished Member
Without naming the company what industry was she in. Retail/sales?

Hospitality. A strange mix of independent pub, cafe and restaurant at lunchtime / evenings. Lovely place, great food and selection of ales (apparently). Just really, really poor middle-management.

One of the owners is very laid back and just wants to be friends with everyone. The other guy is very by the book and a stickler for processes. Unfortunately, he has little to do with this particular establishment as he concentrates on the other two places

I haven't set foot in the place since this all kicked off. I used to love their burgers as well :)
 

RBZ5416

Distinguished Member
Email them saying she will contact HMRC
Just to add, no need to make it confrontational. Just highlight their oversight & ask for it to rectified within 14 days. Then finish with you hope this can be resolved promptly as otherwise it will have to be escalated to a formal employment dispute. Hand deliver a copy too.

Had to do similar recently after quitting a rotten job & not being paid outstanding holiday entitlement. Gave them a couple of gentle prompts over the course of a fortnight with no resolution. Formal letter through their door & email copies Sunday night, paid in full Monday afternoon.
 

BB3Lions

Distinguished Member
I recently did the same after they ignored my emails and telephone calls. Was paid the following working day, in full.

Nothing worse than burning bridges, but, bills need to be paid.
 

tickedon

Well-known Member
It's a legal requirement to be given written terms of employment (but they don't need to give you a contract you sign): What must be written in an employment contract | Acas

Is it possible the employer is essentially discriminating based on age - only offering shifts to those under 18 where they can pay a lower hourly rate?

If so, a suggestion of an age discrimination claim, which would also let you then claim for the lack of being provided terms, might result in a quick payment and a happy goodbye by both parties...

Otherwise given there's no work and no terms, I think a brief "it's been nice, thanks, I'm off" would suffice in terms of a "resignation".
 

Ste7en

Distinguished Member
My daughter handed in her notice. Much to the shock of the owners of the establishment. Which shows you how broken things really were IMO.

It wasn't a full on 'burn all bridges' resignation letter, like the one I drafted for her - just to give her some ideas.

My brother knows the owners so he has heard a bit of the fallout. Stuff along the lines of "If she wasn't getting paid the full amount she should have told us. If she heard nothing she should have chased it up." She did, she done both things. First time when she was underpaid and a second time (2 - 3 months, and one shift later, when she was underpaid again).

They also tried to say she was "not committed", despite being the hardest worker there when she finally managed to get a shift. Six days sick in two and a half years. Two of which were not sick days (one she booked as a holiday to celebrate her 18th birthday but the manager ignored the request and another when they changed how they distribute the rotas but didn't tell her).

In all honesty she is better off out of the place. Shower of morons can't run things correctly.

Oh, apparently they prioritise shifts for people who have mortgages, loans etc. they just don't tell anyone about it, but it is still "policy". How it can be policy if they don't tell anyone is beyond me.

What happened with the underpayment is that, apparently, they told the accountants to make the change. But the one that deals with it was off. Off all that time? Yep, sounds like BS to me.

Apparently now they are outsourcing all staffing issues to an HR company.

Looks like the penny may have dropped that the girl they employed to run the place is a bit of a knob and out of her depth.
 

hippo99

Distinguished Member
Oh, apparently they prioritise shifts for people who have mortgages, loans etc. they just don't tell anyone about it, but it is still "policy". How it can be policy if they don't tell anyone is beyond me.
So the bosses there know exactly which employees have loans outstanding? o_O
Doesn’t ring true that is something people would discuss with their employer.
 

Ste7en

Distinguished Member
So the bosses there know exactly which employees have loans outstanding? o_O
Doesn’t ring true that is something people would discuss with their employer.

I agree. It did fire my BS detector as well.

Forgot to say that the boss sent a 'reply all' email back to my daughter (and the owners) basically covering all the points she raised. But trying to cover her back. I've seen this sort of thing dozens of times at my own place of work.

"What do you think she is doing Dad?"
"Rewriting the narrative. Trying to cover her own back. It is what some people do when they drop the ball or are out of their depth"
 

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