Guide: How to fit an "F" connector

Tesla

Active Member
How to fit an "F" connector

Connectors:

fconnectors.JPG


There are several different types of "F" connector available on the market, essentially you have a threaded screw-on connector (left) or crimp-on connector (right). The crimp connectors offer a more secure fit but require the purchase of an expensive crimper tool so not recommended if you only need to make one or two connections. There are different sized F connectors. The standard size is pictured below and designed to fit RG6 sized cable.



screw.JPG


A lot of people are unsure how the screw-on F connector remains on the cable, you can see in this picture that the connector has an internal thread.



otherconnectors1.JPG


otherconnectors2.JPG


There are a wide range of add-on connectors available too. The above are the most commonly used, an F-Barrel (right) is very useful when extending cable runs. We also have male and female belling-lee type which can be used when making up interconnect fly leads. Or perhaps from a TV outlet wall socket to TV.



Cable:

cable.JPG


The cable I have used in this demonstration is Webro WF100. An excellent foam-dielectric cable with excellent screening properties. You can see in the picture that you have the outer insulation, inner copper insulation, copper foil layer, foam dielectric and finally the inner copper core. This is the cable which I would recommend using if you are extending any cables or making up your own interconnects.



Tools:

tools.JPG


There are several fancy stripping tools available on the market. I have never found any of them to be flawless so for this guide I have stuck with using a knife. The yellow tool is a pair of sharp cutters, blunt cutters will crush the cable before cutting through it so make sure they are nice and sharp. The other tool is a crimper, not required when using screw-on connectors.



Method:

1)

1.JPG


First, make an incision through the outer insulation only all the way round the cable, around 7.5-10mm from the end of the cable.


2)

2.JPG


Now, pull the small piece of cut away insulation away from the end of the cable. Do not worry if a few of the outer copper strands come away with it. However, if the majority of copper strands also come away then you have cut into the cable too deeply and should chop this part of cable off and start again.


3)

3.JPG


Next fold back all of the outer copper strands.


4)

4.JPG


Cut through the copper foil and foam dielectric (not the copper core though!). Do not cut it flush with the level of the outer insulation, leave a small piece of foam protruding, the foil is still intact around this small piece of protruding foam too (it makes fitting crimp connectors easier if you leave the foil in place but is not essential for screw-on connectors). I like to leave a little bit of foam protruding as when the connector is screwed onto the back of say a satellite STB this small piece of foam compresses against the socket making a really secure connection.


5)

5.JPG


Place the screw-on connector over the end of the cable.


6)

6.JPG


Screw the connector on, it will get tight but keep going. I find it easier if i pinch the cable just below the connector to stop it from flexing/twisting.
Screw on until that small piece of foam we left protruding above pokes through the connector by about 2mm.
If you have any copper outer strands showing you can carefully trim them off.


Crimp Connector

7.JPG


The crimp connector is very similar to the above, although not threaded it does require a bit of rotation/screwing when pushing onto the cable as it is such a tight fit. You then use the crimp tool to squash the connector onto the cable, if crimping make sure you use the correct sized crimper for the connectors you have purchased, I have seen badly crimped connectors on many occasion.



Note:

If you have any suggestions on improving this guide or my method then please do not hesitate to get in touch. I hope this proves useful to some of you guys.

I did make a thread about providing pre-made cables at one point but there was not much interest. If this is not the case and people would like this then please let me know and I will have discussions with the forum owners about providing a service via the boards.

If you would like to reproduce any of this guide or use the images then please ask before doing so.


Thanks,

Chris
 
R

recruit

Guest
Thankyou Tesla for a very insightful and useful post :thumbsup:

I did make a thread about providing pre-made cables at one point but there was not much interest. If this is not the case and people would like this then please let me know and I will have discussions with the forum owners about providing a service via the boards.

And if there is interest then please contact Admin ref to you're suggestion :)
 
D

Deleted member 30535

Guest
If you have any suggestions on improving this guide or my method then please do not hesitate to get in touch

I remember reading somewhere that to ease the insertion of the "male" F into the spring - loaded "female" connector, then the central copper cable of the coax should be cut at a 45 deg angle, rather than square across. It helps to guide the coax core into the spring loaded bit.
 

Tesla

Active Member
I remember reading somewhere that to ease the insertion of the "male" F into the spring - loaded "female" connector, then the central copper cable of the coax should be cut at a 45 deg angle, rather than square across. It helps to guide the coax core into the spring loaded bit.

Yes, this is a good tip I missed out. It's only required if you get a tight female though, ooh err!
 

cloudcity

Active Member
Thank you Tesla, all that info was very helpful. I got it right first time.
 

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