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GU10 LED based bulbs

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Buying & Building' started by sean.pittaway, Jan 18, 2005.

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  1. sean.pittaway

    sean.pittaway
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    EDIT: Posted this in the DIY bit, but here might be more sensible? :)


    I have been toying with the above for a while now...

    I use spots for background lighting in the living room which also houses my projector (use low wattage ones in the bedroom as well as reading lights) all are dimable, but the heat/power usage is a bit of a putoff.

    Led based ones sounded great on paper (low power/heat) but i am getting conficlting advice about diming/whiteness...

    I poped into focus last night and picked up the white led gu10 and it worked - but in no way, shape or form could it honestly be called white, bright blue seems more acurate :)

    Anyway, does anyone on here use them and can anyone recomend any white ones or higher output ones?

    Cheers, sean.
     
  2. Docta teef

    Docta teef
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    Do a search this is not the first time that a member has said the focus white bulbs are a bit Bernard Manning ( ie blue)
     
  3. hinesle

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    Hi,

    I bought I bought a few of theses to run as recessed lights up the staircase. I couple of issues

    1.They cant be dimmed.
    2.if connected to a vari-light dimmer then the lights are always on. (when off there is a faint light transmitted from the Bulbs)
    3.Again the light is not white more blue/white and is not very bright compared to conventional GEU10 bulbs
     
  4. TheChump

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    Oh yes they can! - the Ring Focus bulbs are one of the few GU10 LED bulbs that are readily available that can be dimmed. They're even marked as dimmable on the front of the packet.

    No problems at all with my Volex dimmer. However, they don't dim by a great amount as they're not very bright to begin with (one of the major problems with these bulbs - but at £8.99 each you have to weigh up the pros and cons).

    Agree with you - it's a 'purer' white/blue light (though not that blue) when compared to the standard orange/red light given off by filament and halogen bulbs. It can seem quite strange after looking at ordinary light bulbs for a number of years!!!
     
  5. hinesle

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    Cheers for that update.

    Looks like the dimmer/bulb combo you mentioned is the current way forward for LED's. Its shame I didn’t know about this before spending £5k on a rewire. Arrrr but you learn.
    :suicide:
     
  6. johnl937

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    Hi Guys, LED work using `pulse width modulation` to be dimmed properly they need a special controller, also the colour of white light is defined in `kelvin` you need a white light 5000K plus to get close to white light.

    John Lyons
    Auroralight.co.uk
     
  7. Gregory

    Gregory
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    Don't know if it was just a dodgy source, but we bought three to try in our kitchen and two 'blew' pretty quick. THey were also rather blue and with little spread (hence stopping at the three test ones and going for 20 normal ones). IN terms of blowing, they seemed to be comproised of three sets of LEDS - one went first, with the remaining ones then brighter and thene the remaining two went pretty quickly thereafter. I decied that I'd wait until the technology had settled down a bt before going for them again
     
  8. mucca_D

    mucca_D
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    I used the ones from maplin http://www.maplin.co.uk/Module.aspx?ModuleNo=35331&doy=3m5D

    but they simply do not last. I took the first one back and they changed it, two months later all four went back for a refund, @£14.99 I want a few years not a few months :eek:

    On the + they where the brightest I have used
     
  9. consciouspnm

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    The ones from TLC-Direct are half the price of the Maplin bulbs!
     
  10. mucca_D

    mucca_D
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    silly question, but are they the same?
     
  11. consciouspnm

    consciouspnm
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    The ones I originally got were 20 LED 2w, the ones they do now are 15 LED 1.8W which is the same as Maplin. Also, have a look on ebay (search for GU10 LED) I've bought a couple of the RGB colour changing LEDS which I'm waiting for delivery. I'm also going to get some of the 20 LED white ones.
     
  12. baldrick

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    Edit - I meant to post this in the 240V v 12V thread....

    What about LED GU10s? I've been thinking about these for our new house (100+ fittings) and I've just found these 48LED units: http://www.ultraleds.co.uk/product_info.php?cPath=50&products_id=1077

    How would these compare to a traditional incandescent 240V GU10?

    The inital costs would be much great but at 50,000 hours lamp life and 4.4W the on going costs would be considerably reduced....
     
  13. cac63

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    Hello the forum! Chris here! My own experiences may help inform some of the questioners to date on the subject of GU10 LEDs.
    By the way, a white LED is actually an ultraviolet one with phosphors in it which absorb and re-emit the light with a different set of wavelengths which are meant to look white (with varying levels of success).
    I purchased a number of '1.5W', 18 LED and '3W', 20 LED GU10s about 18 months ago for roughly £4 each, from a shop on eBay, to replace 50W halogens. They were pretty dim and quite blue in colour, as everyone seems to have experienced, but I kind of expected that. We put up with them anyway. Interestingly, when switched off they still glowed a little, which must be down to induced voltage from neighbouring wiring in the loft - enough to see your way by in the middle of the night!
    Recently I bought a '3W+/-20%' (3x1W elements) 'warm white' one from another eBay shop (to try it) for a scary £11.50, and found it to be difficult to distinguish from the original 50W halogen both in hue and brightness and certainly massively better than the old ones. I have since measured their actual electrical power with an Ecosavers Power Monitor (also from eBay), whose accuracy I have had no reason to doubt, and found my old 1.5W ones were actually 0.4W, my old 3W ones were 0.7 to 1.2W and my new, excellent 3W one is actually 3.7W. So last year I was being even 'greener' than I thought but living in the dark. I recommend only buying 1 of any type, seeing if you like it, before forking out for any more. Good luck! (I'd give you the name of the eBay seller I got the good GU10 from, but don't want to be accused of advertising or if you buy a load and then sue me becuse they're not as good as I said!

    Important Final Note: the ceiling above my kitchen had big holes in the insulation because of the risk of halogen GU10s overheating and causing a fire. This led to bad loss of room heat. The LEDs run almost cold so I have filled the insulation holes above. So the sticker in the lamp holder saying "max 50W" MUST be changed indelibly and securely for "max 5W" to prevent someone from fitting 50W in future and burning the house down!
     
  14. cimh

    cimh
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    Reporting on my limited experience of replacements for 50w halogens.

    1. BriLux 6W LED GU10: warm white, 40000 Hrs, 50mm dia, 6w
    I like this bulb a lot, slightly narrower beam than halogen and a tiny bit dimmer (I guess 40-45W) pleasant warm colour.

    2. TROJAN GU10-9W: 9 watts, 3100k - 3500k, 50,000 Hrs, 3x3w, 270 Lumens, 50 x 63 mm.
    Not so happy with this one. It looks similar to brilux and has same beam angle but it looks slightly colder (even tho its rated warm white)

    Conclusion brilux is good but I'd still prefer something a bit brighter

    cimh
     
  15. Mikey601

    Mikey601
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    The blue effect many of you talk about is just a different render of a white. LED's are all blue when born and like someone said coated in phosphors to create whites and all other colours.

    If your looking to replace GU10's with an LED version then you are going to be limited. The different renders of white within the GU10 range are very limited. Companies producing LED GU10's at a very low price you can bet your bottom dollar are using multi binned phosphors. I wont bore you with the details of that but basically means the "white" render will be very sparadic.

    You'll be hard pushed to create the output of a 50w bulb from any LED GU10, altho they may seem as bright when looking at your wholesalers but actuall lumens and lux reading will be far from comparable.

    To replicate the output of a 50W bulb you can easily achieve this via LED and not at a cost thats going to break the bank. The lowest on the market is a 7.9w complete retro fit unit, which will produce more light output than a 50W bulb. Plus its also the only part L1 and L2 compliant unit out there.

    People think LED is hugely expensive to create the same amount of light output within their homes, this really isnt the case...
     
  16. T1NY W

    T1NY W
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    Which one ?

    Where from ?

    How much ?

    Thanks in advance
    Tiny
     
  17. MarkP80

    MarkP80
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    - I reckon that's a payback of around 2 years in typical use. Not convimced I'd bother on a cost basis, unless I've got the sums wildly wrong. How many hours do they last?

    MarkP
     
  18. Mikey601

    Mikey601
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    FR 01011 FNW Collingwood Fire rated downlighter

    Ranges from which wholesaler you use
     
  19. T1NY W

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    Thanks for that :)

    It's a shame they're not strictly GU10's and won't fit in my outside lights.

    Nevermind, thanks for the info anyway :D

    Tiny
     
  20. ln1234

    ln1234
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    £60-£100 per light???
     
  21. figflower

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    Hi, I have found these Cree LED based GU10s and was wondering if anyone else had experience of them.

    The Homewatt bulb is 6W and I'm told by Homewatt, although they don't have it on their site, that it is >=300 lumens and has a beam angle of 100degrees. Plus they have a 3yr guarantee! It's £30!

    Low Energy Bulbs | GU10 & MR16 LED Bulbs | Energy Efficient Light Bulbs | LED GU10

    The other, Exergi, seems to be more widely available but not as powerful. It's 4.4W with a 38degree beam and 170 lumens with a 1 yr guarantee.

    EXERGI HyperBright GU10 LED 4.4 Watt 50,000h Warm White wide flood

    This one is £24.

    Has anyone had experience of these. Thanks.
     
  22. CrunchyCredit

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    Those two products are very different from each other - one is 38 deg beam angle (very narrow, almost like a torch beam) the other is a wide angle, so more like a Halogen. There is some feedback about the exergi lights, LightPlanet and others here
     
  23. lagigolo

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    I bought some external spotlights with gu10's in. In the shop they had some blue leds in. I bought some of these to put in and they were so dim i took them back.
    The lights are still to be fitted as i quickly tried them just to see, but these are going up again soon as weather permits. As i have 3 sets with 2 bulbs in each i really want to go down the led route. Since buying them i believe they do some brighter than the 1w ones i tested.

    I will purchase one from b&q and try it, at least i can take it back until i get the right look. I don't mind paying for the right ones but can't afford to buy a whole set and take the chance.
     
  24. CrunchyCredit

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    I don't think that you will find the kind of light output that you need from the bulbs sold in B&Q. You need something in the 7w range if you are looking for serious halogen replacements.
     
  25. NXG

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    I've just bought a couple of low energy GU10 lights from my local Tesco. Not seen this type there before so I think they're a reasonably new item to them.

    Anyway, replaced two or the four standard 50W GU10 Halogens in my kitchen light fitting. Those 50W bulbs get so hot that they've made distinct dark patches on the ceiling.

    The light is definately whiter, but not by much and still very acceptable. The diffusion is also much better than I've seen in this type of light before. They have a fairly bulbous body but a long enough neck for the contacts to lock into the recessed socket. Worth a punt I think :)
     
  26. greigym

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    Basically you get what you pay for. I got advice from a friend who is an architect and uses Professional-lamps UK. I bought some MR16 units that arent the cheapest but are very good quality and work on my dimming system. I was so impressed I went back to them and bought some of their retro fitting round bulbs as well. Not sure on their exact details but im sure they are googleable!!!
     
  27. Evil Elvis

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    Terry, i have 5 gu10's in my kitchen, my kitchen has no windows and my electricity bills are fricking huge, would you recommend these:Code: GU10LED3WWHITE on your site? I am only a nurse and on a budget?
     
  28. illingworth22

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  29. gordons1

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    Hi there,
    Anyone putting in downlighters should be aware that they should be "FIREPROOF" units not the old cheapy versions !.
    YES, LED's can be dimmed and YES there are now very bright BUT still expensive £20+ for the 35/50W type with 15yr warranty.
    Rgds.
     
  30. Tfish

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    Only in new builds or new extentions?

    And isnt that only downstairs too?
     
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