Got a Pioneer HD display, what now?

Discussion in 'General TV Discussions Forum' started by Neil Fellows, Jul 1, 2004.

  1. Neil Fellows

    Neil Fellows
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    Ok, dumb question time - I am getting a High Def Pioneer Plasma, and eventually would like to watch High Def TV here in the UK. Exactly what do I need to do this? I don’t have a sky dish, and know little about such items as I’ve never had satellite TV before. Any help would be much appreciated.
     
  2. Dutch

    Dutch
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    Hi Neil,

    Well a usual 45cm Sky dish won't be big enough for the Euro1080 broadcasts as the UK is on the edge of the satellite footprint. A 60cm dish should suffice for most of the UK, and combined with a QS-1080IR receiver, will provide a 720p or 1080i signal for your Pioneer. Sky have announced HD broadcasts starting in 2006, so you could then add another LNB to your dish to receive them - although you would likely also need another receiver ! Hope this helps.

    Steve
     
  3. Neil Fellows

    Neil Fellows
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    Steve,

    Thanks for that. I have a feeling that i'll wait untill Sky just does a complete HD package and go for the whole thing in one go. Excuse my lack of tech knowledge, but was is an LNB?
     
  4. Chris Muriel

    Chris Muriel
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    LNB = Low Noise Block converter.
    Most are actually LNBFs with the F standing for integrated Feedhorn.
    It's the bit at the dish that takes a Ku-band signal from the satellite (between 10.9-12.75 GHz normally) and converts it to L-band between 950-2150 MHz to feed it down coaxial cable to your satellite receiver.
    A normal "universal LNB" (or LNBF) has 2 fixed local oscillators at 9.75 and 10.6 GHz ; which one is used depends on the presence or absence of a 22KHz that the STB feeds up the coax along with the 14/18V power. 14 Volts is used for horizontal polarization and 18 volts for vertical.

    More info : http://www.mti.com.tw/default.htm

    Chris Muriel (a satellite anorak in Manchester)
     
  5. Messiah

    Messiah
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    Well, that told him :eek: :laugh:
     

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