Got a masthead amp set up, signal still could be better?

RoyT

Established Member
I've got a masthead amp already, and having just bought a Humax Freeview box I've noticed that the signal could still be better, it's quite prone to drop-outs etc.

I never get above 60% strength, but do get 100% quality, so I'm thinking that if I could get somehwere near 70% strength I'd be better off.

I've got a Labgear PSM110 in the loft connected to an amp on the aerial.

I've been considering getting something else to boost it , possibly nearer the TV.

Would another PSM110 put near the aerial socket be appropriate, can these things work in series?

Alternatively, should I get a simple domestic style booster and if so does anyone have any recommendations of good ones, preferably with adjustable gain control?
 

SamRadford

Prominent Member
Can't comment without knowing your postcode.
 

per-Sony-fied

Established Member
A good masthead amp is made by Vision.They come in various guises. Take a look over at http://www.satcure.co.uk/accs/page11c.htm These will offer more gain & less noise than most & therefore hopefully a better stronger signal.

Ultimately tho' one should address any aerial issues you have first (is it an aerial ideal for freeview).... you may just get away with better down lead coax to improve signal quality, like CT100 which is double screened.
 

RoyT

Established Member
Thanks PSF I'll check that out.

Sam - this is more a question about electronics and what I can do to improve what is there rather than a coverage question.

I'm mostly interested in the effect of running boosters in series essentially and if there are boosters that are particularly well regarded.
 

per-Sony-fied

Established Member
I'm mostly interested in the effect of running boosters in series essentially and if there are boosters that are particularly well regarded.

Running boosters in series will make matters worse as all they will do is amplify the noise & signal of the masthead amp along with it's own inferior noise therefore producing far to much noise & gain, negating any benefit these devices could have, we want more signal less noise for an improvement. More likely to overload the tuner i/p by some margin causing no recievable pictures at all.
 

SamRadford

Prominent Member
I agree. I can think of no circumstance where cascading amplifiers would get a better Freeview signal, except in the rare case where the aerial was connected by several hundred metres of cable. An amplifier serves two purposes:

1. To bring the received signal above the Freeview tuner threshold - 53dBuV of signal at the tuner input is reckoned to be adequate as a minimum.

2. To compensate for cable loss - about 0.2dB/m would be required.

If the signal isn't high enough to begin with, the only answer is a better aerial or move the aerial to a better position. You'd be surprised how often it's necessary to move an aerial DOWN the pole slightly to improve the signal.
 

RoyT

Established Member
Fair point Sam, so my search for a miracle answer continues :D

I'm hoping to avoid the whole" huge ladder and running up and down it" situation to be honest... I don't fancy the height, the aerial is at the top of a tall chimney, plus I don't thnk I have the stamina :D
 

LV426

Administrator
Staff member
You could easily end up spending more money, and getting worse results, by using amplifiers and boosters and so on, rather than getting someone in to set you up with the right aerial installation for the job.

There is no substitute for the right bits of aluminium pointing in the right direction at the right height.
 

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