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Gizmodo remotely shutting LCDs at CES

Reign-Mack

Active Member
My Ipaq pda has nevo embeded so you can program it pretty quickly as long as you know the brand, have done this quite a few times in bars and stuff during football matches. recording it would be a little too risky though.
 

bigden29

Standard Member
but imagine doing it at a big event like CES, apparently gizmodo are getting sued, they also want to ban them from future events.
 

Reign-Mack

Active Member
but imagine doing it at a big event like CES, apparently gizmodo are getting sued, they also want to ban them from future events.


Not really just a bunch of sales people and geeks, a bar full of football fans all boozed up wondering who turned the tv over the holby city half way through the match ...its funny and a little scary.
 

bigden29

Standard Member
lol true, true. also being thoughts of sued will make me think twice, before i even consider. will be an amazing prank if you could pull it of, film it and not get caught don't you agree:D
 

Singh400

Distinguished Member
It was funny for a bit, then it just turned lame. Don't worry, they'll get whats coming to them - karmic justice and all that.
 

bigden29

Standard Member
don't worry about the justice bit there getting sued, i have to admit it was funny to see all those big corporate companys pissing there pants not knowing what to do.:rotfl:
 

Broxi1979

Active Member
I think that was bad form on their part. Gizmodo went to the CES show on full Press Credentials and then did that during a presentation. Not to mention that they rely on advertisement from some of these guys.

They are having their pass revoked for next year and the guy responsible will be banned:
http://www.news.com/8301-10784_3-9849168-7.html
 

F1Fan72

Well-known Member
:rotfl:
 
You would think at an event like that you would not be using displays which have functional IR recievers as any average joe could switch it off, serves the stand right for not thinking of that security flaw, if anything they should be thanking gizmodo for highliting that security flaw.., not punishing them.. All they have to do is cover the reciever with some tape or material to shield the IR signal, the controls on the display are more than enough to switch it on and chenge the channel, they will be using the same channel the whole day so no biggy...

Who actually plans these events?, poor planning I say, not taking the basic security flaws into consideration...

What's stopping anyone using a portable EMP?, now that would be funny?...:D, not sure how portable they come though....
 

benwillcox

Active Member
You would think at an event like that you would not be using displays which have functional IR recievers as any average joe could switch it off,

Exactly, most commercial models of plasmas etc have an option to disable the IR receiver for exactly this reason!

Cheers,
Ben
 

DVD-Man

Distinguished Member
You would think at an event like that you would not be using displays which have functional IR recievers as any average joe could switch it off, serves the stand right for not thinking of that security flaw, if anything they should be thanking gizmodo for highliting that security flaw.., not punishing them.. All they have to do is cover the reciever with some tape or material to shield the IR signal, the controls on the display are more than enough to switch it on and chenge the channel, they will be using the same channel the whole day so no biggy...

Who actually plans these events?, poor planning I say, not taking the basic security flaws into consideration...

What's stopping anyone using a portable EMP?, now that would be funny?...:D, not sure how portable they come though....

Beat me to it, now how many people know gizmodo who previously didn't?

Can you imagine this in court? Judge, The defendant turned off some televisions:rotfl:

Liam
 

JUS

Well-known Member
You would think at an event like that you would not be using displays which have functional IR recievers as any average joe could switch it off, serves the stand right for not thinking of that security flaw, if anything they should be thanking gizmodo for highliting that security flaw.., not punishing them.. All they have to do is cover the reciever with some tape or material to shield the IR signal, the controls on the display are more than enough to switch it on and chenge the channel, they will be using the same channel the whole day so no biggy...

Most people go to those shows to see the exhibits. I wouldn't expect some moron to go with a remote and turn off the screens.....What's the point?

Someone getting off on spoiling people enjoying themselves :rolleyes:

I could see the point in having a remote to turn down the music in some bars so you can talk to your mates who are a few inches away from you but turn off a tv the whole bar is enjoying watching... :rolleyes: ...maybe I'm getting old...
 

njp

Well-known Member
You would think at an event like that you would not be using displays which have functional IR recievers as any average joe could switch it off, serves the stand right for not thinking of that security flaw, if anything they should be thanking gizmodo for highliting that security flaw.., not punishing them...
In the same way that people should be grateful for malware writers infecting their PCs because it encourages them to think harder about security, presumably?

Yes, they should have disabled the IR ports (and I'm sure they will next time), but perhaps the show organisers' greatest mistake was in expecting bloggers to behave like proper journalists rather than like children with an annoying toy. Can we look forward to some stink bomb hilarity next year?

What's stopping anyone using a portable EMP?
I'm guessing the fact they don't exist might be one reason.
 

williemaykit

Active Member
In the same way that people should be grateful for malware writers infecting their PCs because it encourages them to think harder about security, presumably?

Yes, they should have disabled the IR ports (and I'm sure they will next time), but perhaps the show organisers' greatest mistake was in expecting bloggers to behave like proper journalists rather than like children with an annoying toy. Can we look forward to some stink bomb hilarity next year?


I'm guessing the fact they don't exist might be one reason.


I totally agree with you. What Gizmodo did borders on sabotage and gives grounds for companies like Motorola to sue them. They were privileged to gain access to the show, it exhibitors and its dignitaries. It was not a piece of harmless fun (they would have stopped at a couple and not had their fun during presentations). There was a degree of malice involved and this makes it wrong - plain and simple.
 

nej

Active Member
A courtroom. The case-announcer speaks: "Next case, 1053345. Various vs Gizmodo."
Judge: "Right, what happened here?"
Prosecutor: "Sabotage, your honour."
Judge: "Please explain."
Prosecutor: "Well, during a consumer electronics exhibition, they switched off some televisions."
Judge: "They did what?"
Prosecutor: "Switched off some televisions."
Judge: "I fail to see how this is sabotage."
Prosecutor: "Well, it caused inconvenience and embarrassment to our clients."
Judge: "I see. The televisions were beyond repair?"
Prosecutor: "Well, no. They were switched on again moments later."
Judge: "They suffered significant loss of business?"
Prosecutor: "Well, no."
Judge: "So, you are suing because the defendant switched off some televisions, requiring your clients to switch them back on again?"
Prosecutor, "Er, correct. We are seeking $20m in damages."
Judge: "Get the hell out of my courtroom."

At least, that's how it should go!
 

wombar

Active Member
Seems pretty lame to be honest on the Gizmodo employees part. If you're going to go representing a company as a member of the press, you shouldn't be messing with people, especially in the middle of a presentation. Fine, turn a few of the TVs off on stands where people are just handing out fliers, but when people are relying on the TV as an integral part of their demonstration, it's just pathetic.

Should people really have to turn off IR receivers at a trade show because some idiot is walking around with one of these devices? I personally would say not. Although saying that, I bet they turn them off next year to prevent this happening again.

I don't know about CES suing them (realistically it's probably not going to happen), but I think they'd be perfectly justified in banning them from next years event. I also wouldn't be surprised if they got banned from other shows as this kind of stunt won't be looked on kindly by any show organiser.
 

Daddy k

Distinguished Member
hehehehe obviously the big kid in me is more alive than others on the forum, it made me giggle!

a bit like that news story last week of the child wizz kid who controlled all of the trams
 

Daddy k

Distinguished Member
just watched it again, and i actually found that far more funny than a man of my age should! as such i will write 500 lines of
"it is not funny to watch profesionals at a tech show confused by tv's switching off but the power led is still on, yet they still are not cleaver enough to turn it back on"
 

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