Gigabit network Smart switch query

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by css_jay99, Mar 7, 2013.

  1. css_jay99

    css_jay99
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    Hi Guys,

    I am interested in buying a 16port Gigabit switch. So I then started thinking maybe I am better off with a smart switch. ... purely to give me a network kill switch for devices on my LAN since I cant find a router with such function(or do they exist ?) ...

    I was considering the Netgear GS716T but not so sure how silent it would be in the lounge since it is not fanless.

    TP-link and D-link are doing cheaper smart switches but I cant seem to find reviews about them either

    Opinions appreciated.

    cheers

    css_jay99
     
  2. stevelup

    stevelup
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    Check out the ZyXEL GS1510-16
     
  3. css_jay99

    css_jay99
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    Hi, Have you had any experience of this switch.

    Their website does not show it as one of their current products


    css_jay99
     
  4. stevelup

    stevelup
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    Hi

    Yep, I've got 80 of it's bigger brother (GS1510-24) out in the field - never had one fail. The GUI is fairly powerful.

    The reason I suggested it to you is that it has no fan.

    In stock at BroadbandBuyer

    You're right - it does appear to be discontinued. Doesn't matter though?
     
  5. drummerjohn

    drummerjohn
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    The GS724T (24 port versions of the GS716T) is noisy. You would not want that in any living area.
     
  6. drummerjohn

    drummerjohn
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    LAN to WAN - Draytek routers such as the 2920 and 2850 can Strict IP bind so that if the mac address does not match the table it will not issue an IP &/or allow access through it.

    If it's LAN to LAN then yes - a manageable switch is the easiest method.
     
  7. css_jay99

    css_jay99
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    The ZyXEL GS1510-16 does seem to be the cheapest smart switch around, looks like i am sold on it

    cheers guys
     
  8. css_jay99

    css_jay99
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  9. mickevh

    mickevh
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    Depends really on what you want it to do e.g. low power, high throughput, low latency, high MAC table size, low noise, low heat, low cost, SNMP, manufacturer support, software upgrades, warranty, "bonus" features such as Link Aggregation, VLAN's, QOS, COS, traffic classification, port authentication, STP, yada, yada...

    It's a bit like asking, "which is best, and Aston Martin DB9 or Volvo FM10 Truck?" Well it depends on whether you want to pose on the Kings Road in a cacophony of noise and tyre smoke or haul 30 tonne loads from London to Scotland and sleep overnight in it.

    IMHO you'd be off to make a list of feature you are interested in, (a "requirements list,") then go shopping for it.

    Granted, if you just want something to "play" with, then creating a list of requirements is hard if you don't know what's available and thus what you'd be interested in. So perhaps you ought to look through a fair few of the buzzwords in some switch spec. sheets, go see what they are, then decide whether it's for you.

    I tend to think for SOHO users, Link Aggregation (if you've go clients and servers with multiple NIC's and LAG support) might be of interest and maybe VLAN's & some routing capability if you want to partition you network into multiple sub-net's (though there's not much call for that) and lot of people get interested in QOS/COS.

    However there's a bit of a "gotha" with understanding of "QOS." On the whole QOS breaks into two function - "classification" which "marks" the traffic with the appropriate QOS "tags" (usually combined with VLAN tags) to ascribe the traffic with a given priority level and "prioritisation" ie, implementing a mechanism that expedites delivery of (say) priority 6 traffic over priorty 3 etc.

    Lot's of switches implement the "prioritisation" mechanism of "QOS" (it's easy to do - look for switches boasting about "multiple queues" and the like.) Not so many switches (esp. at the cheap end of the market) implement the "classification" mechanism as that's harder to do "out of the box" and the user usually has to write a set of "rules" to determine what traffic should be classified as what priority ("classification policy.")

    A lot of people when they talk about "QOS" are not talking about the type of mechanism I've just described, but instead are talking about "traffic/bandwidth" shaping in the sense of "I want to give device/port X this much bandwidth and device/port Y that." It's not at all the same thing as most switch manufacturers talk about when they refer to "QOS" so pay careful attention to those specifications.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2013
  10. css_jay99

    css_jay99
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    I am sure 99% of the smart/manage switch bells & whistles will be lost on me and almost certain I will not need them ...

    My needs are very simple since I am using at home :-
    1) Gigabit ports
    2) Ability to see speed of port. Useful for me when I am moving data around and there is a slow down ....

    It almost seem as if my Interest in smart switches is (2) alone.


    out off curiosity, is it possible to create VLAN for all adhoc connections to the internet. e.g segregating my home network from anyone else who needs to connect to my network at home ?


    css_jay99
     
  11. mickevh

    mickevh
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    Ethernet works at fixed "link rates" (speed) and doesn't speed up and slow down.

    In days gone by, some switches were less capable than others at handling the "traffic capacity" if all of their ports were running at full tilt you might see some performance fall off, but that's increasingly rare these days, even cheap unmanaged switches seem to be able to handle full traffic capacity on all their ports simultaneously.

    Look at switches that claim to be "wire speed" or have a stated "bandwidth" which is the sum of all the port link rates. E.G. a 4 port switch with a "4gbps bandwidth" (4x1gbps) or sometimes they quote "8gbps" being the sum of the ingress and egress link rate combined (2x4x1gbps.) The more interesting "number" off the spec sheets is the packet switching capacity, often quoted in a number of "packets per second" (pps) - though that's something of a nominal figure because packet sizes are variable. (How big a packet? 64 byte, 1500 byte, one of the "Jumbo" sizes such as 4096 bytes.) It's a bit of a black art to predict it, rather like the road network, because much is dependent on "traffic patterns" and types and your network topology.

    That said, any "slowing down" is much more likely to be atributable to your source and sink devices, esp. the HDD's, than modern ethernet switches - even cheap ones.

    You can use VLAN's to provide traffic seggregation, however, you need "something" to "route" that traffic between the VLAN's and/or the Internet. This is what "routers" do (join networks together,) however most of the SOHO onmi-boxes called "routers" don't have enough routing interfaces to avail this, so you'd have to provide something that does. (Extra box, new router with more routing interfaces, or a switch that has a routing engine built it.) It's all a tad more complex, and certainly not plug-and-play.

    If you want to avail the occasional "guest," especially with a wi-fi device, you might be better off to look for one the SOHO routers that offer a "guest" SSID that take care of the seggregation for you unless you have particular need to avail guest access "wired."
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2013
  12. RustySpoons

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    Sounds like an unmanaged switch will suit your requirements, if you want to do vlans just use an old PC as your router with many distro's that are out there, or buy a cheap low power cpu/board. There are also products by MikroTik which will do either or both of your requirements, have a look here: LinITX.com - MikroTik Routers
     
  13. blue max

    blue max
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    The very latest GS724T doesn't have a fan I believe.

    I've got one (the V3, but with a fan - noisy, but in a cabinet in the utility room). I barely use any of the features as I mainly bought it because I wanted a rack mount one. It's quite esoteric, so be prepared for a learning curve!

    The regular switches by netgear show the port speed by one light or two (100/1000) by the port when a cable is plugged in. The GS108 or GS116 are both silent.

    Good luck.
     
  14. css_jay99

    css_jay99
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    you guys are feeling my head with so much info it hurts !
     

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