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Geometry????????????

Discussion in 'TVs' started by Matt123, Apr 13, 2005.

  1. Matt123

    Matt123
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    When people talk about the geometry of a TV Picture, what do they mean??? Sorry, complete technical no hoper here :oops:
     
  2. Tight Git

    Tight Git
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    Matt123,

    Geometry means whether the scans are linear.

    In other words, does the picture appear stretched, especially at the edges.

    The best test is to see if a circle really is circular and not egg shaped.

    I can do a more detailed explanation if you wish, but that's basically it.
     
  3. JayCee

    JayCee
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    The "Geometry" is the size and vertical/horizontal placement of the picture on the crt or "Tube" :lesson:
     
  4. Matt123

    Matt123
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    No, that makes perfect sense Tight Git. Thanks :)

    One question though if I may? Is there a setting for this? Such as contrast/brightness etc? And is it listed as 'Geometry?'
     
  5. JayCee

    JayCee
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    No, It is never listed in the ordinary user menu as incorrect adjustment can
    screw up the picture completely.
    It is usually hidden in a secret "Service" or "Engineer's" menu and accessed by a combination of button pushes via the remote or a combination involving the remote and the buttons on the set.
     
  6. Matt123

    Matt123
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    Thanks Jaycee. Luckly the geometry on the new set was fine out of the box :thumbsup:
     
  7. Steve_P

    Steve_P
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    If you want an example of what changes can be made to geometry then take a look at the settings of a typical CRT computer monitor. Items such as Pincushion, trapizoidal, tilt, skew, vertical width, horizontal width, vertical height and horizontal position are all aspects of the monitor's geometry that can be adjusted. Strange that the same settings for most normal TV's are hidden being buried deep within engineering service menus.

    S.
     
  8. Tight Git

    Tight Git
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    I think it's for historical reasons.

    TV's are (and always have been) a domestic product, to be used by non-technical people.

    As such, keeping the more difficult adjustments hidden is probably a good idea!

    In the days of mechanical controls, picture amplitude and linearity (for example) were literally hidden, inside the cabinet.

    Although computer monitors are now a domestic product, originally they existed only in the more technical business environment, often with a specialist to maintain them.

    So, they were provided with easily accessed adjustments.

    For some reason, this design philosophy has remained.
     

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