Garden with no visible division - To divide clearly or not to divide?

CyberCad

Member
I moved into a new house a year ago. It’s a bungalow with a large garden and more garden than the adjoining semi-detached. I have a larger part of land to the rear of a open space before it. The neighbours are an elderly couple and have been very sweet, save for one incident shortly after I moved in. I started chopping things around (removing trees and bushes etc.) on my land and was confronted one day for doing so. People don’t like change…

I had to explain, rather reluctantly, that I am entitled to do whatever I want to on my own land and will do so. It was a bit awkward. I don’t want to upset an elderly couple (who don’t have too long left and had been used to a more easy going approach from the previous resident) but I am beginning to feel that I am hesitating to do what I want to do with my garden for fear of causing upset. But it does not feel right. I am living with someone else’s ideas in the past of how the garden should be used and it does not match my plans.

There is no fence at the front or the back of the house to mark the two separate garden areas and feel I could get more enjoyment from my land and organise it more interestingly if I created a ‘soft” separation that made things clear.

Anyone had any experience of this? Any suggestions? I have read somewhere that “clear boundaries make for good neighbours”…

Help!

Thanks…
 

DPinBucks

Distinguished Member
Personally, I think your attitude is exactly right.

Do what you like; it's your land. But at the same time don't be brazen about it. If you can, do it gradually so as to cause less upset. You might want to explain your plans to them; but if they still want to complain, tough.

Be aware, though, that you can't remove trees willy-nilly. You should check that they're not covered by a protection order or covenant.
 
D

Deleted member 161415

Guest
As above, I think your attitude is bang on.

You clearly care about your neighbours feelings and it reads that you don’t want to “feel bad” about making the changes you’d like in your garden.

As per poster above, purely for your own feelings I would politely advise them what you are planing, (even though it makes no odds) ask them how they feel about it etc, etc.

Once above is done you won’t feel bad anymore regardless of what they say.
 

Tight Git

Distinguished Member
I've lived in six properties since 1968 and with one exception have always got on well with the neighbours.

(The exception was a couple with three young children who could do no wrong in their parents' eyes and who just ran riot up and down the street, including my garden! :mad: )

Anyway, I've found the secret to happy neighbours is communication. :lesson:

We moved to our present bungalow with the intention of having a large extension to house my snooker table but I was wary of people's attitude if the first thing they saw was the pink planning leaflet nailed to the front fence.

So, I personally went round to introduce myself and explain my intentions.

Result, no objections and a constant supply of snooker opponents! :smashin:
 

CyberCad

Member
Personally, I think your attitude is exactly right.

Do what you like; it's your land. But at the same time don't be brazen about it. If you can, do it gradually so as to cause less upset. You might want to explain your plans to them; but if they still want to complain, tough.

Be aware, though, that you can't remove trees willy-nilly. You should check that they're not covered by a protection order or covenant.
Thank you very much! Your words have helped me.
 

CyberCad

Member
I've lived in six properties since 1968 and with one exception have always got on well with the neighbours.

(The exception was a couple with three young children who could do no wrong in their parents' eyes and who just ran riot up and down the street, including my garden! :mad: )

Anyway, I've found the secret to happy neighbours is communication. :lesson:

We moved to our present bungalow with the intention of having a large extension to house my snooker table but I was wary of people's attitude if the first thing they saw was the pink planning leaflet nailed to the front fence.

So, I personally went round to introduce myself and explain my intentions.

Result, no objections and a constant supply of snooker opponents! :smashin:
Thank you very much! Those are very wise words which I intend to heed. Dare I ask, are you a good snooker player? My brother tried to improve my skills recently but I am a sorry ”also ran” when it comes to the snooker table! I think I had better stick to chess…
 

CyberCad

Member
As above, I think your attitude is bang on.

You clearly care about your neighbours feelings and it reads that you don’t want to “feel bad” about making the changes you’d like in your garden.

As per poster above, purely for your own feelings I would politely advise them what you are planing, (even though it makes no odds) ask them how they feel about it etc, etc.

Once above is done you won’t feel bad anymore regardless of what they say.
Thanks! I very much appreciate your advice.
 

Tight Git

Distinguished Member
Thank you very much! Those are very wise words which I intend to heed. Dare I ask, are you a good snooker player? My brother tried to improve my skills recently but I am a sorry ”also ran” when it comes to the snooker table! I think I had better stick to chess…

Alas, no, highest break of 33, and that was a very unusual frame where the balls happened to be near the pockets. :blush:
 

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