Garden Decking Softwood / Hardwood / Composite ???

rdmbfossa

Active Member
Looking for some advice on decking. We've just built a new house and have an area outside our patio doors which we are considering decking. I just wondered what type of wood people who had laid decking used and why they chose it?
 

owen021173

Well-known Member
Any treated(tanalised) timber from your local builders merchant or if you have a sawmill close by will be what to use.
Is it a raised deck on posts on are you laying it at base level?
 

rdmbfossa

Active Member
At base level, no handrail just a flat open deck looking onto the garden so pretty basic, about 25-30m square. I prefer the look of hardwood, its obviously more expensive, although the frame and labour would be similar so its only the extra cost of the actual decking boards, but just wondered if there are any downsides. I've only seen decking done in normal pressure treated softwood other than internet pictures. Was interested to hear peoples opinions of compostite decking also and how it looks and how maintenance free it really is.
 

owen021173

Well-known Member
I've only fitted the 'standard' decking system which I get from my local saw mill.
Never been asked for hardwood but would imagine its expensive.
As for labour, why not have a go yourself? It's not hard to do.
4"x2" framework fixed at 400mm/16" centres with noggins fixed inbetween the centres at 1m,2m and so on and that is it.
Find your levels,if grass, dig about 8" out and fill with concrete so you can bed a concrete block on it, do this every 1.2m /4ft,and then you can continue level till you end up with blocks dotted all over.
Sit the framework on and fix some angle brackets on the inside and bolt to the block and 4x2
I personally screw the deck boards, found they can lift sometimes using a paslode nail gun.
Maintenance wise can be a chore if you have a lot line myself but a pressure wash and scrub with cleaner every year does the trick. Then seal it with a good decking sealer

So have a go mate
Forgot to add before but go to your local steel fabricator for the angle brackets, the ones I get are 3"x3" and are pre drilled ready for coach screws :)
 
Last edited:

ldoodle

Distinguished Member
can lift sometimes using a paslode nail gun.
I did mine with a Paslode, using ring-shanked. Not had any lifting problems in 5 1/2 years of the decking being laid.

Did you use plain nails or RS nails? Just interested.
 

owen021173

Well-known Member
ldoodle said:
I did mine with a Paslode, using ring-shanked. Not had any lifting problems in 5 1/2 years of the decking being laid.

Did you use plain nails or RS nails? Just interested.
75mm ring shanks although I did say sometimes and depends how wet the boards are.
Never had a problem with 5x80 screws in the 15 or so years I've been fitting it
 

NorvernRob

Distinguished Member
I've only fitted the 'standard' decking system which I get from my local saw mill.
Never been asked for hardwood but would imagine its expensive.
As for labour, why not have a go yourself? It's not hard to do.
4"x2" framework fixed at 400mm/16" centres with noggins fixed inbetween the centres at 1m,2m and so on and that is it.
Find your levels,if grass, dig about 8" out and fill with concrete so you can bed a concrete block on it, do this every 1.2m /4ft,and then you can continue level till you end up with blocks dotted all over.
Sit the framework on and fix some angle brackets on the inside and bolt to the block and 4x2
I personally screw the deck boards, found they can lift sometimes using a paslode nail gun.
Maintenance wise can be a chore if you have a lot line myself but a pressure wash and scrub with cleaner every year does the trick. Then seal it with a good decking sealer

So have a go mate
Forgot to add before but go to your local steel fabricator for the angle brackets, the ones I get are 3"x3" and are pre drilled ready for coach screws :)
Decking should be sloped not level, around 10mm drop per metre in the direction of the grooves in the boards is enough to prevent standing water.
 

owen021173

Well-known Member
NorvernRob said:
Decking should be sloped not level, around 10mm drop per metre in the direction of the grooves in the boards is enough to prevent standing water.
What, so a 2" drop over 5m ?
Sorry mate, but not the way I was shown how to do it .
Mind own has been down just over 9 years and it's still bang on level ,been fine with yearly treatment
 

logiciel

Moderator
750 square metres of hardwood would be rather expensive.:D
I thought decking had gone out of fashion though, and now it would probably reduce the value of the house.
 

rdmbfossa

Active Member
Thanks for all replies so far. Yes definately 25-30 square metres not 750:eek: Decking does remind me of ground force and Titchmarsh many years ago, but I'm not sure what else to do, I'm not too keen on paving slabs or lock block. Any suggestions on what the modern alternative to decking is would be appreciated :D That's one of the reasons I thought about hardwood or composite as I think it would look a bit different to normal decking but I would like to hear from somebody who has it to know the pros and cons.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
If you like it it's not unfashionable :) At least that's my take on it. Unless you're only putting it in in order to sell it.
 

rdmbfossa

Active Member
Just built our dream house so not looking to sell or move for some time hopefully :smashin: Garden is fairly large so we will still have a good area of grass, any ideas on what materials to use to make an attractive seating area welcome.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
Tanalised wood deck :D :thumbsup: Hardwood would look nicer, but it's serious money.
 

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