Future tech that didn't make it?

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member
I couldn’t disagree more based on my own experience. Still building bicycles here, building climbing frames, playing with electronic circuit boards, horses, pets, tree houses, fabricating parts for cars now, rebuilding parts of engines, composing music with the piano, and sheet music, baking, and so on. It’s still there and alive.
Same - just because we have some tablets doesn't mean they aren't making bow and arrows, garden forts, exploring the woods and all the other things.
 

Tempest

Distinguished Member
I couldn’t disagree more based on my own experience. Still building bicycles here, building climbing frames, playing with electronic circuit boards, horses, pets, tree houses, fabricating parts for cars now, rebuilding parts of engines, composing music with the piano, and sheet music, baking, and so on. It’s still there and alive.
Yes, but you're probably not normal................

In a GOOD way :thumbsup:
 

Tempest

Distinguished Member
<The generation that went from a grounded human race to man on the moon in their lifetime has joined the chat>
Indeed.
Man on the moon. That ended :(
Supersonic public flight. That ended :(
Being able to sell and buy second hand games. Near Death :(

Still, I'm not complaining as I love tech and always have done. :)
 

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member
Yes, but you're probably not normal................

In a GOOD way :thumbsup:
Do you think that kinda maybe possibly you're the one that's not normal? :) In a serial killer way :laugh:
 

Dony

Distinguished Member
During lockdown I found it fascinating to watch what my kids did to occupy their time. As with others, they have their tablets and games consoles, but the most played with 'toys' were old style board games like monopoly and cluedo, bike rides and playing cards. Cookery was another big hit.
As I'm typing this, my daughter is currently in the garage sanding down some pine bedroom furniture and repainting it white.
 
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imightbewrong

Distinguished Member

mr starface

Well-known Member
I couldn’t disagree more based on my own experience. Still building bicycles here, building climbing frames, playing with electronic circuit boards, horses, pets, tree houses, fabricating parts for cars now, rebuilding parts of engines, composing music with the piano, and sheet music, baking, and so on. It’s still there and alive.
I was with you all they way up till having a Horse and a Piano, we just about stretch to a cat and a electronic keyboard here. Oh and only having one tree which isn't really big enough for a treehouse.
 

joner7777

Well-known Member
I couldn’t disagree more based on my own experience. Still building bicycles here, building climbing frames, playing with electronic circuit boards, horses, pets, tree houses, fabricating parts for cars now, rebuilding parts of engines, composing music with the piano, and sheet music, baking, and so on. It’s still there and alive.
I also can find other things to -- playing keyboards , biking trips , microlight flying but i was really on about tech , AV , how it use to be and able to get involved and experiment with it.
It`s so miniaturized now and having old eyes does not help !
 

Doug the D

Member
I couldn’t disagree more based on my own experience. Still building bicycles here, building climbing frames, playing with electronic circuit boards, horses, pets, tree houses, fabricating parts for cars now, rebuilding parts of engines, composing music with the piano, and sheet music, baking, and so on. It’s still there and alive.
I read @Tempest's post as saying that his (my?/ our?) generation is fortunate that we've had one foot in the past, with 'old school' things to play with and entertain us and one foot in the 'future', now having access to the amazing and extremely fast changing tech that we all enjoy today.

I didn't read it that because we have VR headsets it means that making a go-kart out of an old pram doesn't happen in a garage somewhere anymore, it still does :)

Contrast our generation (and anyone alive today really) with people that lived hundreds of years ago and it's a very different pace of change imo.

[Sometime in the distant past]

'Check these out, they're amazing!'
'What do you call these incredible devices?'
'Shoes'
 

Deezell

Active Member
Two edged sword for me on this ,
I am fascinated on the latest tech and what it can do but, being a old school analog geek i long for the days when i had bundles of cables linking boxes doing stuff.

In my garage i have av cables dating back to the 70`s (just in case) bin bags full of them.
It used to be a real scene of success when rerouting through a certain way to achieve a Tv picture on a separate monitor in another room from a master tv ,405 line tech, black and white vintage.

Now it`s all done through wifi or a app , not a second thought given to it.

I can`t think of anything now that cannot be done with AV gear.
Suppose we ought to be grateful that we are in a age now to use all this clever kit , but i do miss my experimenting ....
....Any ideas , what a older ,bored ,analog geek can build?
Fair play, it was VERY tricky to take anything out of old b&w 405 line TVs, as they generally had no mains transformers, just half rectified mains on the chassis, and on every component. Lethal if you hooked up to the volume control without an audio transformer, and as for getting a composite video signal...

Mens Shed Suggestions; build a binaural microphone. One of the obsolete techs mentioned here. Scavenge 2 electret mic heads from old cassette recorders or the like, mount on either end of a 20cm rod, facing slightly forward, ( bodge a little case for each, I used empty XLR connector sleeves). Fit a 25cm diameter 5mm perspex or plywood disk in the middle, to stimulate human ears and head separation. Mount on an old Mic stand or whatever, connect a stereo minijack, and record general audio on laptop or such. Play this back on headphones. You will be astounded by the realism of the spatial audio. You'll position people walking around you, behind you, etc.
I made one in 1979, used it to record my wedding in 1980 on a decent stereo cassette deck. On headphones, it was like being there.
 

IdoLikeFilms

Standard Member
Dedicated 'PhysX' cards for your PC. Basically you would have your standard gaming set up with a graphics card but could add a separate card that would handle all the physics being calculated in the game thus freeing up valuable CPU usage. Unfortunately developers saw that it was an expensive upgrade for customers and only a handful of games had it as a dedicated option.

Nvidia then acquired Ageia (the company making the cards) and phased out the separate card in favour of adding more CUDA cores to their own graphics cards and making them do the hardware acceleration. And that was the end of that.
 

Tempest

Distinguished Member
^ Indeed it's sad the BIG boys killed of more customization.

Weirdly enough, listening to a podcast yesterday, there was just general talk that Apple, in their stupidly overpriced Mac Pro's could go back down this route, and offer special Apple custom chippery to enhance specific tasks for specific needs.

There is definitely less diversity these days in many of these type of things.
 

mikeysthoughts

Well-known Member
^ Indeed it's sad the BIG boys killed of more customization.

There is definitely less diversity these days in many of these type of things.
On the previous page you were very keen for a single standardised hardware approach?
 

Tempest

Distinguished Member
On the previous page you were very keen for a single standardised hardware approach?
Good point!

Perhaps I can explain it by saying I wish and feel things COULD be better for us all, if we were all working together on one goal, AND there were options, with all those options working together.

Not that you had to buy one range or products, only to find one thing you'd like, but that would mean scrapping it all and needing to buy a different range of products.

Perhaps I can understand this in early days when everyone is experimenting, but would be so nice if we could all work towards a common goal.
We'd get a lot further is we could do that.

Let's get Apple and Google to merge all their mapping data, as opposed to keeping it to themselves.
Or Nvidia, AMD, Arm, Apple, Intel ect to all get on-board to make some kick ass CPU and GPU's

None of this will ever happen as it's competition, one could argue that drives things forward
It's just a shame that. making things better were not enough of a drive in itself.

I have all Google stuff (gave up with the echo's) but perhaps I'd like the echo wall clock.
Sorry no that won't work :(
 

kav

Distinguished Member
Good point!

Perhaps I can explain it by saying I wish and feel things COULD be better for us all, if we were all working together on one goal, AND there were options, with all those options working together.

Not that you had to buy one range or products, only to find one thing you'd like, but that would mean scrapping it all and needing to buy a different range of products.

Perhaps I can understand this in early days when everyone is experimenting, but would be so nice if we could all work towards a common goal.
We'd get a lot further is we could do that.

Let's get Apple and Google to merge all their mapping data, as opposed to keeping it to themselves.
Or Nvidia, AMD, Arm, Apple, Intel ect to all get on-board to make some kick ass CPU and GPU's

None of this will ever happen as it's competition, one could argue that drives things forward
It's just a shame that. making things better were not enough of a drive in itself.

I have all Google stuff (gave up with the echo's) but perhaps I'd like the echo wall clock.
Sorry no that won't work :(
 

Delvey

Distinguished Member
Dedicated 'PhysX' cards for your PC. Basically you would have your standard gaming set up with a graphics card but could add a separate card that would handle all the physics being calculated in the game thus freeing up valuable CPU usage. Unfortunately developers saw that it was an expensive upgrade for customers and only a handful of games had it as a dedicated option.

Nvidia then acquired Ageia (the company making the cards) and phased out the separate card in favour of adding more CUDA cores to their own graphics cards and making them do the hardware acceleration. And that was the end of that.
And RTX will be the next one to fall (though raytracing itself will likely stick around)
 

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member
People are saying CD is dying technology on another thread. Wrong!!
Screenshot_20200703-083311_Chrome.jpg

On the one hand, 50 million sales is a lot. On the other hand, it's 5% of the annual sales of 20 years ago and the line is going in one direction.
 

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member
Yep 50 million in one Country is a lot.
Down from a billion seems like a dying technology to me. Be interesting to see where that line goes.

I used to buy five a week - got a thousand of them in the cupboard. I've not bought one now since about 2009.
 

deantown

Distinguished Member
I stand corrected. I’ve never bought a full price CD for years. But I get some great bargains in Charity Shops, eg Beatles - Abbey Road CD Brand new condition for £1.
 

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member
I stand corrected. I’ve never bought a full price CD for years. But I get some great bargains in Charity Shops, eg Beatles - Abbey Road CD Brand new condition for £1.
The problem is nowadays if you have Spotify, Amazon music etc you can listen to Abbey Road for £0. And picking up a CD in a charity shop doesn't keep the industry afloat - someone needs to make the original purchases.

The fact you can get it for £1 second hand also shows the problem - probably ten/fifteen years ago it would have been £5 for a good second hand copy - streaming has completely taken the bottom out of the market as the demand has crashed.
 

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