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Franz Ferdinand

Discussion in 'Music & Music Streaming Services' started by Miyazaki, Feb 6, 2004.

  1. Miyazaki

    Miyazaki
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    I just got their self-titled album, which IMO is very good.

    The major problem I have with them, however, is their blatent plajorism of 'The Strokes', which is a bit cringing at times, especially during 'Take Me Out'.

    Probably the best Scottish band though. Certainly better than 'Travis', who IMO are trite MOR rubbish.
     
  2. anu

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    Where'd you get it from? Their album's not out until Monday???

    Listening to Shopping for Blood/Darts of Pleasure/Van Tango/All for you Sophia/Take Me Out// though, they're brilliant.

    I saw a bit of a similarity with The Strokes, but they're certainly not ripping them off. And anyway, The Strokes are guilty of ripping off other work too - although I usually look at it more as a source of inspiration in most cases like this. It doesn't appear to be directly taking from The Strokes, but every band gets some ideas from those preceding them - from what I've heard, FF are more unique than any other band around atm.

    If Take Me Out is the worst case of plajorism in your opinion, then I don't think there's a very strong argument.
     
  3. Miyazaki

    Miyazaki
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    I downloaded it mate.

    It's not the worst case of copycatting ever, but a few tracks on there bare more than a close resemblance.

    Good none-the-less :smashin:
     
  4. Whiting

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    Much like the Strokes, Franz Ferdinand's reference points are the post-punk scene of the late Seventies. Whilst the Strokes owe a lot to the Modern Lovers, Television etc, Franz Ferdinand have more in common with Talking Heads (check the album 'Remain In Light') and, especially, Leeds' Gang Of Four. Go and get their debut album 'Entertainment' (seminal, man) and the comparison is clear.

    As for 'Take Me Out', a quick listen to Led Zeppelin's 'Trampled Underfoot' will tell you that they aren't looking at The Strokes for inspiration. Not in the slightest, they're going further back than that.
     
  5. Miyazaki

    Miyazaki
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    Fair enough!

    But surely it is the sound that 'The Strokes' recaptured that has enabled FF to come to the foreground?
     
  6. Whiting

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    Oh, yeah, probably. Everything goes in circles so if it hadn't been The Strokes, it would have been another band with that CBGB's sound.
     
  7. Senninha

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    It is incredibly rare to find something truly "new" - all music affects others, and inevitably will shape others to a greater or lesser degree.

    I don't think we should bemoan FF for having some similar cues as The Strokes - IMO that's a really good thing! Now there are two bands we can really enjoy, whereas the alternative would have been some other ridiculous Pop Idol, where absolute aim IS to find someone who is the closest clone to whatever tripe is spinning money these days.

    Absolute plagiarism, and the quickest possible ROI. And in the unlikely event it's good music that will be a lucky side-effect.
     
  8. Miyazaki

    Miyazaki
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    Totally agree Senninha, but I refuse to believe that there will never be any "new" music.

    I don't really begrudge FF for doing it, I mean I even listened to Oasis in their day! ;)
     
  9. Senninha

    Senninha
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    Oasis were, IMO, a fantastic band. Okay, formulaic of many things that have gone before, but some superb songs and albums.

    By nothing "new", I meant that things are only new in the sense of being different to something(s) that have gone before to a greater or lesser extent. The last genre that was considered as "new" was rap music, yet even rap can be taken back hundreds of years to Jamaican and African native forms of music. In the eighties rap exploded, but before that in the seventies even more popular bands utilised rap, and it was street culture way before that. So in one sense it is a new form of music (in a commercial sense of the genre), yet it isn't really "new" as such.

    Ironically I think the music industry itself is a deterrent to new forms, in the same way the movie industry is to experimental films. With "rule of three" style consolidations, the cost risk involved in taking a chance is often too great for larger corporations, that additionally struggle to act quickly enough to follow a trend far less set or develop it. So as we see more and more the "copycat" approach to Pop Idol, star search and so on and so boring, there are correspondingly fewer opportunities for really "good" or new styles to break through.

    I actually think we've been pretty lucky recently with the quality of some music. Many things in life are cyclical, and I had a theory that music quality also followed decade long cycles - sixties were awesome, seventies were a low point, then punk and rap kicked us out of that, and the eighties were pretty good. Nineties were generally poor (all IMO!), and the "zeroes" were supposed to be good, but up until now were failing. So the last year or two have been a breath of fresh air IMO.

    Here's hoping for much more of the same!
     

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