Frame Doubling/interpolation using ffdshow

olmer

Novice Member
I found it adds more artefacts then removes judder, particularly on poor/ish sources – it is ‘not advanced enough to calculate a true motion vectors’ – true – just using postprocessing, nothing else. If you have a good source and high enough refresh – there is hardly any other way to make it better. Poor MPEG is what it is and not much can be done about it (yet).
 

Stephen Neal

Distinguished Member
Yep - even the high-end TV's have pretty poor frame interpolation technology that gets horrendously confused with statistically random or very fast moving content. Action sequences in movies in particular defeat it.

Broadcasters have to spend tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of pounds on high-quality standards converters to interpolate from one frame rate to another - still with limitations, PCs and consumer goods don't stand a chance with current processing power.

Also - interpolating extra frames from a 24/25Hz captured sequence will not solve the aliasing artefacts present - it will just smooth them. The old favourite of wagon wheels going backwards instead of forwards (caused by the frame rate being too low to capture the motion effectively) is still an issue - they just go backwards more smoothly with the interpolation (IF the motion tracking algorithm can cope well with rotational motion - many systems only cope with linear motion)

I still prefer film to look like film and video to look like video (and 24/25Hz video to look like 24/25Hz video!) - but ensuring 24Hz video is displayed at a multiple of 24Hz, and not at 60Hz with 3:2 can remove a lot of nasty assymetric motion judder.
 
The problem is some of us cant tolerate 24p. I cant, it look like a slidshow on a TV, its extremely juddery. This algorithm helps no end, even with the artifacting. Not sure id rather put up with 60P judder instead though.
 

The latest video from AVForums

Podcast: Marantz SR7015 & NAD T 778 AVR + Mission LX2 MKII Speaker Reviews, AV & Film News and More
Top Bottom