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footage from many VHS tapes on one DVD...

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by dvdope, Apr 24, 2004.

  1. dvdope

    dvdope
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    Hi
    I want to transfer odd varying timed bits from different VHS tapes onto one DVD. It would also be great if I could rearrange these bits into some sort of order and maybe add further bits of old tape at some point in the future. Knowing next to nothing about DVD I feel things might not be as simple as I would like. Can you clarify for me whether I can put lots of different footage (from 2 minutes to upwards of 20 minutes) from multiple VHS tapes onto one disc and possibly also do some simple basic editing of arranging the order of the clips – alphabetically etc. I would rather go the way of a DVD recorder rather than using a computer as I believe the software needed requires a minimum of 60 – 80 gigabyte space and min 256 Ram. I don’t know if mine could be upgraded to this and don’t want to get another comp yet.
    PS Also I heard/read from somewhere that the picture recorded on the disc can be better than the original tape. Doesn’t quite sound possible but would like to hear the answer from the pros.
    (Excellent forum BTW)
     
  2. davee b

    davee b
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    You can do that easily. i archive tons of different tapes to the same disc. you can either pause the dvd recorder then change tape which will give an (almost) seamless transition to the next bit of footage, or stop the recorder then the next track will be recorded as a new title. If the footage is from old video tapes then the output quality can indeed be improved by the dvd recorder (in my case the panny E55). i think you can reorder the playlist although i havent actually done this myself, i might stand corrected on this one. :D
     
  3. mray

    mray
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    As far as I know, there is no limit on the amount of clips you can put on one dvd. But I think they all have to be the same format, pal or ntsc. You can't mix them.
    What I have noticed when transferring vhs stuff is that there is less jerkiness in the picture and colours are more stable, so that's a definite improvement. It wont make a good tape look any better though.
    As for editing, you can edit with dvd-ram, not dvd-r. I don't know about the philips machines. Have a look through the threads, there are people who know much more than me who post regularly here.
    Hope this helps.
     
  4. malcom

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    Hi dvdope. As others have pointed out you can do what you want with the Panasonic machines. Editing short bits of VHS to a DVD-R using the pause button can be done (I have done it when I only had one machine) But you have to be well organised and have a lot of patience. If you do make a mistake you can delete specific menues from a DVD-R but you cannot edit a menu.

    In practice it is better to record all your VHS bits onto a RAM disc. As VHS is a "noisy" source I would recommend you use the max quality setting (XP). Then edit out any bad bits you don't want.

    Now here comes the problem. to put your edited masterpiece onto DVD-R you will need a second recorder or player in order to playback the edited RAM disc to a DVD-R disc.

    The problem with using just a DVD player to do this is that any edit points on your master RAM disc would show up as slight pauses on play back (Not at all good). If you use another recorder instead then there is no problem as the recorders have the seamless playback option in order to avoid those pauses.

    Your best bet if you are rich enough is to go for a Panny Hard drive/RAM/DVD-R combination machine and record all your VHS onto the hard drive then edit then copy direct to DVD-R all in the same machine.

    I too find that VHS transfered to DVD looks better. Rock solid on play back...Its a treat.....Good luck. malcom.
     
  5. dvdope

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    Thanks guys for all the help. I'm very relieved to read that it can be done. Looks like i may have to put up with the pauses inbetween as my budget will be under £300 so don't think i can stretch to the recommended 'everything in one' player'. Had a thought though - If i get everything transferred onto disc(s) could i at a later date play around with editing since they're digital (perhaps using a computer or other means?). Although my main priority is to preserve the tapes it would be nice to maybe add intros or make them look more professional should i get into this area which i'm sure i will at some point. Cheers.
     
  6. pinatubo

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    The E55 along with other Panasonic DVD recorders have a "Time Base Corrector" built in especially for this purpose.
     
  7. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    You can edit a DVD at a later date onto another DVD with edits etc, but although it is all digital there will be further loss of quality as anything recorded onto a DVD is highly compressed. If this is not too much of a problem then you will be able to add extra clips, menus etc.
    If you are doing this to create a long term archive of footage then recordable DVD is not going to be the best option as these disks are not likely to last long term. There is a known problem with an effect known as 'DVD rot' where a disk becomes unplayable. On cheap disks this can be within months rather than years. Branded disks are still not guarenteed to last any length of time, but if looked after should last a few years.

    Mark.
     
  8. dvdope

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    Thanks again for the help but i don't like the sound of what Mark said "...If you are doing this to create a long term archive of footage then recordable DVD is not going to be the best option as these disks are not likely to last long term. There is a known problem with an effect known as 'DVD rot' where a disk becomes unplayable. On cheap disks this can be within months rather than years. Branded disks are still not guarenteed to last any length of time, but if looked after should last a few years."

    I thought DVD's (including recordable) could last practically a life-time. What are my options for VHS to disc transfer where i don't have to worry about degradation or unplayability in months or a few years? Just when i thought i was beginning to understand things a little....;-)
     
  9. SIP

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    Hi dvdope

    I too ventured into the world of recordable DVD, to do exactly the same as you. I, like many others, succesfully transfer my old VHS/SVHS/Hi8 tapes onto disc.
    What Mark has said is true in so many words, that DVD is not the infallible format that everyone thinks it is....but there is really no other alternative. If you use a good branded DVD disc, and not these 50p jobs that so many use and swear by, then at least you are on a good footing. Nothing is 100% reliable, but you do get what you pay for, so start off with good discs. I too started off editing my tapes, by having to press the pause button on the DVD in order to edit scenes together, and it is a long and tiresome job...especially if you over run by a few frames, as there is no going back, but the end result is worth the effort. As previous postings have said, an HDD/DVD-R combi, is worth the money....even if it means waiting a while till your budget increases. I thought it was an expense I could Ill afford, and went headlong into a standard DVD recorder....... but with hindsight, I wish I had waited. I now know that I could have copied all my footage onto the hard drive, edited it and then burnt it all onto a DVD-R.....not just once, but many times, making one or two backup discs in the process and safe guarding my precious tape collection.
    If you cannot go down this route, then all I can recommend, is that you make your DVD disc, then ask your local PC world or local computer shop, to make a backup of your disc for you. My local shop charges a fiver for this, and you dont need a high IQ to work out how quickly this adds up, so consider it carefully.
    BTW....what no one explained to me, when I first joined this forum and asked my questions about DVD recorders, is that home produced DVD discs do NOT play back 100% accurate in other DVD players. It is a point worth noting, as I made various discs for family & friends of home movies, and the playback of these vary from player to player. Dropped frames, "sticky" patches and total freeze ups are the order of the day. Even my Panasonic E50 which the stuff was recorded on, does not always play faithfull to the disc it recorded - in truth, to go back to the first point made, DVD is not the infallible format...Far From It. It has as many foibles as its analogue ancestors....but as I said, there is not really an alternative.
    Sorry if it sounds like I'm running the whole DVD thing down, and I hope I may have helped in some Odd way, but I think you should know the drawbacks.
     
  10. MarkE19

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    As the DVD recording technology evolves it is getting not only faster & cheaper, but also more reliable. As stated steer well clear of the cheapest disks and don't try to fill the disks to their limit. Store them upright in proper cases and try to avoid scratching them. The newer 4x or even 8x branded disks should then last at least a couple of years. As this is still very new technology nobody really knows how long disks will last. the 'rot' is only a worst case and does not happen all the time. just be aware that it can and does happen.
    The other thing is to keep the origional tapes in a safe place so that when the DVD's do 'rot' you can then recreate a disk. If you were working on a PC you could also use digital tape system to backup the captured footage for safe keeping, or even have a removeable HDD to store them all on.

    As stated there is currently no perfect answer to long term storage. Its either expensive or takes up a lot of space.

    Mark.
     
  11. dvdope

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    thanks guys. Although my foray (and wide eyed innocence ;-) into DVD has now been knocked for six - hate cricket but its a good phrase - i am now armed with some excellent knowledge that will allow me to make some decisions based on facts rather than the hype. Will keep following the threads to see how things develop and the recommendations.
     

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