Food

Mikebellows

Active Member
Hi,
I have a friend who owns a cafe. He want me to take some photos of the food that he sells, so that he can promote his ware on posters etc.

Anyone got any tips for settings etc?

I have a Fuji HS20EXR Bridge to take the pics.


Thanks,


Mike
 

Jammyb

Well-known Member
A tripod will be a big help I think, 2 sec timer if you don't have a shutter release cable, you want to keep your ISO low with that camera.

Think about lighting, think about your background (nothing worse than taking a load of shots, then realising there's a dirty mark or a distracting object in the foreground or background, likewise dirty plates, crumbs etc). Look at some magazines/cookbooks etc and find shots you like/the owner likes the look of and copy the style of those.
 

Mikebellows

Active Member
Thanks Jammy,
I was thinking of using a flash diffuser to stop the flash flooding the picture.
Also using An open aperture for short DOF, to make the food stand out.

I do have a tripod and will be using it, along with shutter release cable.
 

Mikebellows

Active Member
At the moment, I don't know what he lighting is going to be like - So I was thinking to be best prepared with a flash diffuser.
But yes, I take the point of using natural light where possible.

Thanks.
 

Jammyb

Well-known Member
When I've photographed food I've cooked I'm always against the clock because I'm hungry and I want to eat it before it goes cold. But for this it's less important, so you can take your time. You can obviously practise at home with a salad or a sandwich on a plate. You can stick a couple of desk lamps on either side out of shot.

Remeber light gets harsher/harder with more shadows the further away it is, closer=softer.

Once you get a good setup though you should be able to swap plates and do the shots quite quickly.

White balance will be important so shoot raw or make sure you've got a good WB set.
 

Jammyb

Well-known Member
I find the opposite to be true with food. I'm using a larger sensor camera and wider aperture lenses, but find myself wanting to stop down for more depth of field as while it's not macro photography you're focussing very close.

It's not like portraits where you get the eyes in focus and sod everything else. steak and chips or a bowl of soup doesn't have any eyes if you're doing it right (rib eye has one eye...).
 

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